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just go for rhinox series
 

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yup. would work great.
no no no no no!!!! don't do it! you can inject to much air (co2 technically) into the canister and overheat the impellar. too much gas will build up and your filter will be like a pressure cooker! BOOM! it's a BAD idea IMO! i really wish people would stop informing newbs to do this! :mad: :icon_wink
 

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no no no no no!!!! don't do it! you can inject to much air (co2 technically) into the canister and overheat the impellar. too much gas will build up and your filter will be like a pressure cooker! BOOM! it's a BAD idea IMO! i really wish people would stop informing newbs to do this! :mad: :icon_wink
You're just kidding right?

Reasons for not injecting into intake are noise and possibly accelerated wear of internal rubber parts.

My Hagen laddder was very good at getting the co2 dissolved with my DIY setup, but I prefer the glass diffusor I have now because the ladder was an eyesore in the tank. Have you tried a limewood diffusor?
 

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You're just kidding right?

Reasons for not injecting into intake are noise and possibly accelerated wear of internal rubber parts.

My Hagen laddder was very good at getting the co2 dissolved with my DIY setup, but I prefer the glass diffusor I have now because the ladder was an eyesore in the tank. Have you tried a limewood diffusor?
Do you have experience using a limewood or glass diffusor with DIY CO2. I've heard they may not have enough pressure and the bottle could blow?

And I've heard of others having success.
 

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I have a Rhinox 2000 with a 2L hooked up. It is barely enough pressure to push bubbles through and I even added double the yeast, soaked the thing in bleach for a while. The smaller one might work but I don't know.
 

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You're just kidding right?

Reasons for not injecting into intake are noise and possibly accelerated wear of internal rubber parts.
no, i'm not kidding. read up on it. too much air can get in the impellar housing and cause the impellar to "run dry" so to speak which results in the melting of the head of the canister. i know it's not going to explode. i was using that as emphasis. but as far as the impellar goes, i know it's true. i've seen it.
 

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Do you have experience using a limewood or glass diffusor with DIY CO2.



Yes I have used both.

Although I have used the glass diffusors with success, some people reported problems with DIY setups. I found that forcing air and water through the diffusor before using it made it easier to use, but I am not sure if doing this resulted in an increase in bubble size.

Limewood diffusors should pose absolutely no problem, as you can easily blow through the limewood. There should be little to no backpressure resulting from limewood use. Unfortunately, maintaining the fine mist of bubbles required more maintenance than with the glass diffusor. I think a lot of that could be because I was not using a bubble counter to prevent the yeast sludge buildup.

I've heard they may not have enough pressure and the bottle could blow?
This statement contradicts itself. If a diy cannot build up enough pressure, how could it blow up? :icon_smil

Anyway, I find it hard to believe that the amount of pressure required to blow a bottle up would fail to force air through a diffusor disk unless; 1) the diffusor was defective 2) the bottle being used was not designed to hold internal pressure

Also, what type of tubing is being used? Is the working pressure of the tubing higher than the bottle being used?
 

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I guess if you pump too much air into it it will mess it up. But.. yeah. 1-2 bbs I doubt will have this effect. I've seen no complications running this on any filters I've done this with. nor heard of any untill now. It wouldnt of course explode it would simply burn the motor and once the hosing reached a full point bubbles would just come out of the intake.
 

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Yes I have used both.


Limewood diffusors should pose absolutely no problem, as you can easily blow through the limewood. There should be little to no backpressure resulting from limewood use. Unfortunately, maintaining the fine mist of bubbles required more maintenance than with the glass diffusor. I think a lot of that could be because I was not using a bubble counter to prevent the yeast sludge buildup.
I didn't know that bubble counters prevent the slime buildup. How does that work?


This statement contradicts itself. If a diy cannot build up enough pressure, how could it blow up? :icon_smil

Anyway, I find it hard to believe that the amount of pressure required to blow a bottle up would fail to force air through a diffusor disk unless; 1) the diffusor was defective 2) the bottle being used was not designed to hold internal pressure

Also, what type of tubing is being used? Is the working pressure of the tubing higher than the bottle being used?
It's doesn't contradict itself as you even explain in your 2 scenarios. I imagine that is what happens when people speak of this problem. Although I don't think the diffusor would have to be defective, it would just have to offer more resistance than the bottle. I forget the link, but in one of the more popular DIY CO2 guides the author explains a way to make a release valve to prevent this problem, but it's a bit tricky to get the pressure right on the valve.

Which tubing would be appropriate?

Thanks for the input, it sounds like limewood will be a good option if I can solve the slime problem.
 

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It's doesn't contradict itself as you even explain in your 2 scenarios. I imagine that is what happens when people speak of this problem. Although I don't think the diffusor would have to be defective, it would just have to offer more resistance than the bottle. I forget the link, but in one of the more popular DIY CO2 guides the author explains a way to make a release valve to prevent this problem, but it's a bit tricky to get the pressure right on the valve.

Which tubing would be appropriate?

Thanks for the input, it sounds like limewood will be a good option if I can solve the slime problem.
The statement made was, "I've heard they may not have enough pressure and the bottle could blow?"

This does contradict itself, because blowing up implies an excess of pressure even though the first part states "they may not have enough pressure". The scenarios for failure that I suggested would only be possible if there was sufficient pressure generated.

Also, to re-state, I think that in order for the diffusor to offer more resistance than the bottle, causing bottle failure, 1) the diffusor is defective, or 2) bad bottle used

A correctly functioning diffusor would not offer more resistance than a good bottle. As indicated here, the burst pressure of a PET soda bottle is >100psi. I wouldn't imagine that a diffusor would be designed to work only after overcoming 100psi internal pressure (barring a deep water application), but I could be wrong.

I was wondering about the tubing because it would seem that if everything else were in order, the tubing would be the weakest link and the escape route for the positive pressure inside the bottle (unless it was some kind of high pressure line or was held onto the barbed fitting by a hose clamp). I don't know if that's flawed or not, or if surface area has anything to do with it. Like I said, it was just something I was wondering about.

Aaaaaanyway, (sorry for the OT rant) I have read that putting a bubble counter inline will trap most of the gunk from the yeast mixture and reduce the snot which forms on the diffusor. Haven't tried it myself because I went pressurized before I could fab one up, but it makes sense to me.

Here's a link to the limewood diffusors. I was able to find these in the reef section of my local PetCo for about $4. Good luck!
 

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The statement made was, "I've heard they may not have enough pressure and the bottle could blow?"

This does contradict itself, because blowing up implies an excess of pressure even though the first part states "they may not have enough pressure". The scenarios for failure that I suggested would only be possible if there was sufficient pressure generated.
Right, not enough pressure to operate the diffusor, but enough to blow the bottle. I'm not saying it's likely or common, just trying to get info since I've heard of others ending up with yeast all over there house.

Thanks for the links and the info.
 
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