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Red cherry shrimp aren't picky at all about the conditions you keep them in, so what you are probably looking for is more along the lines of a tank to grow java ferns. Except that java ferns are basically the same situation, so you've picked two of the least demanding species you might want to keep together. In short, you need a tank, some hardscape (driftwood/rocks as you please for aesthetic purposes). Add the substrate of your choice, add water, put the ferns in (most people attach the rhizomes to something with black thread, don't bury them or they die) and supply low light. If you use a fair number of ferns or filter media from another tank, you can add the shrimp immediately.

Don't overfeed the shrimp, they don't eat much at all.

ETA: This message was kind of abrupt, but there's really not much to keeping these species.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well, I already have the Java fern actually.

how many shrimps could I put in a 10g? What other plants do RCS enjoy? Though I must admit I am quite new to this and am trying to build my tank somewhat around the Java fern I have growing on my Mopani Driftwood. is there something else I could plant in the substrate that will spread all over, and grow under LED lights?

How about changing my tank from a planted fish, to a planted RCS tank. how do I go about that? do I need to completely start over? I undersand that dark subtrate is better for RCS.

one more question... do I need to downgrade my filter, in terms of how powerful? Because I have a 35g filter and im concerned that that might be a bit strong for them
 

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I have a aquaclear 70, rated for upto 70gal on a 7gal tank, and a aquaclear 20 rated for upto 20gal on a 2.5gal, Rena XP1 rated for like 50gal or something on a 20gal long, so over filtration is fine and better. I rather have 10x the amount than 1/10th the amount.

Basic LED lighting isn't the best for growing much unless you get into really hi end LED's. If you want to go planted, you can pickup a couple of desk-clip on clips, a couple of sprial compact fluorescent bulbs and be able to grow some decent plants. All shrimp love mosses, and they are easy to grow.

Substrate, some prefer something good for plants to grow but if you're going to stick to mosses, you can get them to grow on rocks, driftwood, etc. Color is a personal choice.

What kind of fish do you have in there now. Most peaceful fish can get along fine with shrimp, although they may eat the little baby shrimp. They won't get all of them though, and some with survive and continue breeding. RCS can breed quickly once established, so if you don't want a tank full of shrimp, having a few babies eaten by fish will keep them in check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have White Cloud Mountain minnows in there now. I was just considering starting over with a shrimp only tank.

Would they be fine with a tank full of just Java fern and several moss balls?
 

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You can easily keep 100 adult red cherry shrimp happy in a 10g tank, assuming good filtration and tank maintenance. That would leave room for the approximately 10 billion juveniles that would also be in residence. Depending on your patience level and the amount you want to spend, you could easily do this by buying 10 or so fire reds from the Swap and Shop here and giving them 8 months or so. The neocaridina multiply incredibly fast. People often keep far more shrimp than this in their tanks, but if you figure roughly 10 dwarf shrimp to a gallon, your probably in the right ballpark.

Red cherries like to have things like hiding places and dense foliage to crawl through, things like grasses or mosses. They're really very forgiving of conditions though, you could keep them in a bare bottom tank and they'd still grow and multiply. As far as what kind of other plants you could use for ground cover, there are a number of options that would depend on what you're after and the type of lighting you have. What sort of LED lighting is it? If it's low light, a lot of people use marsilea, for more light you can get things like dwarf hairgrass to grow, and if it's high light there are really a ton of plants that will act as a carpet, including some beautiful but fussy species.

As far as switching from fish to shrimp, the only thing you would need to do is remove the fish and add a prefilter/prescreen to your filter to protect the shrimplets. If you're using a hang on back filter you might be able to fit it with the prefilter for the Fluval Edge (about $3 from PetSmart.) You also might be able to turn down your heater, as most of the shrimp like it a bit cooler than tropical fish, mid-70's are perfectly fine.

What kind of filter is it? Is there a crazy strong current in the tank? There is almost always an area where the shrimp can hide out and be happy unless your tank is a whirling vortex of doom. If it is really a very strong current in the tank you might see more activity in the shrimp if you downsize, but I'd be surprised if it was a problem. The only filters I can find by google that are sized for a 35g tank look like they'd be perfectly fine to me.

Most shrimp show more color against a dark background than a light background, but as long as your substrate isn't just crazy bright white you should be fine, and with things like driftwood and a reasonable amount of plants in the tank, it's really not an issue even if the substrate is very light.

Aside from the prefilter (my apologies for forgetting it) and the tendency of people new to shrimp to overfeed them, there really isn't much to worry about with RCS. If you wanted to keep a pickier species then you'd have more water condition and temperature issues to worry about.
 

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If you're using a 10g half moon tank with stock LEDs as I suspect, you have enough light to grow myriophyllum mattogrossense. The RCS really pop when cleaning those, especially against a black background.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You can easily keep 100 adult red cherry shrimp happy in a 10g tank, assuming good filtration and tank maintenance. That would leave room for the approximately 10 billion juveniles that would also be in residence. Depending on your patience level and the amount you want to spend, you could easily do this by buying 10 or so fire reds from the Swap and Shop here and giving them 8 months or so. The neocaridina multiply incredibly fast. People often keep far more shrimp than this in their tanks, but if you figure roughly 10 dwarf shrimp to a gallon, your probably in the right ballpark.

Red cherries like to have things like hiding places and dense foliage to crawl through, things like grasses or mosses. They're really very forgiving of conditions though, you could keep them in a bare bottom tank and they'd still grow and multiply. As far as what kind of other plants you could use for ground cover, there are a number of options that would depend on what you're after and the type of lighting you have. What sort of LED lighting is it? If it's low light, a lot of people use marsilea, for more light you can get things like dwarf hairgrass to grow, and if it's high light there are really a ton of plants that will act as a carpet, including some beautiful but fussy species.

As far as switching from fish to shrimp, the only thing you would need to do is remove the fish and add a prefilter/prescreen to your filter to protect the shrimplets. If you're using a hang on back filter you might be able to fit it with the prefilter for the Fluval Edge (about $3 from PetSmart.) You also might be able to turn down your heater, as most of the shrimp like it a bit cooler than tropical fish, mid-70's are perfectly fine.

What kind of filter is it? Is there a crazy strong current in the tank? There is almost always an area where the shrimp can hide out and be happy unless your tank is a whirling vortex of doom. If it is really a very strong current in the tank you might see more activity in the shrimp if you downsize, but I'd be surprised if it was a problem. The only filters I can find by google that are sized for a 35g tank look like they'd be perfectly fine to me.

Most shrimp show more color against a dark background than a light background, but as long as your substrate isn't just crazy bright white you should be fine, and with things like driftwood and a reasonable amount of plants in the tank, it's really not an issue even if the substrate is very light.

Aside from the prefilter (my apologies for forgetting it) and the tendency of people new to shrimp to overfeed them, there really isn't much to worry about with RCS. If you wanted to keep a pickier species then you'd have more water condition and temperature issues to worry about.
I'm using a Cascade 150 Power Filter. I don't think there's a lot of current, but it's certainly powerful. And I don't use a heater.

Another issue that worries me is that I have an Assassin Snail... I've heard those have been known from time to time to take down small dwarf shrimp/rcs. :( And no, i'm not using the half moon 10g. just a regular aqueon 10g, with the Marineland standard 20x10 led/blue light hood.
 

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That filter should be perfectly fine. The listed flow rates are for the filters with no media. With media you might be getting something closer to 100gph, and with a prefilter it will drop a bit more, especially as the prefilter gets gunked up a bit.

Assassin snails aren't really a problem for shrimp. They might kill and eat injured or sick animals (a good thing) or maybe, once in a great while, manage to take a small shrimp, but lots of people keep them together with no problems at all.

Unless I'm mistaken, that's pretty low light. It's apparently been enough to grow java ferns for you though, so have at it. :)
 

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Swap and Shop here on this site. I'd be shocked if you couldn't find more at very reasonable prices. Post a Want to Buy thread if there aren't any for sale.
 

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yeeahh.. i had a really bad experience with Java moss. and I heard it gets quite dirty
The things that make it dirty is the stuff the shrimp love to pick through. lol. I seem mine all the time on my driftwood covered in moss picking out all kinds of fish food and micro-organisms that love to live in there.
 

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yeeahh.. i had a really bad experience with Java moss. and I heard it gets quite dirty
Just curious how did you have a bad expirence with java moss?
 

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Just curious how did you have a bad expirence with java moss?
Java moss attacked and murdered my family while we were staying at a cabin in the woods. It was the worst night of my life. I lost a hand and was hideously disfigured, and am haunted by the memory of the sound of its nonvascular growth to this day.
 
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