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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. So I am still new to planting aquatic plants. I have just started with 4 plants. I'm not sure if they are doing good or bad. It's been about a week since I planted these guys and does the tank with Flourish and use tabs for the plants. I'm still waiting for the PH to get close to my other tank so I can move my fish to this tank, so no fish in there at moment. So here is a picture of my 4 plants and the tank itself.

I'm looking for any advice on the plants and/or if they look like they are doing good or bad.

P.S. The pots are for aesthetic looks and to move the plants later if need be.

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The 4th photo is an Anubias variety and it does not need to be planted in the substrate. So you'll want to remove it and attach it to hardscape with some cotton thread or a bit of superglue gel. That aside, your plants look healthy.

What do you mean about waiting on your pH? Has your tank been cycled with an ammonia source? Generally, you dose about 3-4ppm ammonia and keep the tank at that concentration throughout the "cycling" process. Nitrite eventually shows up and then Nitrate. Once your tank can process 3-4ppm ammonia in less than a day and there's no detectible Nitrite remaining, your tank is cycled and ready to support critter life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The 4th photo is an Anubias variety and it does not need to be planted in the substrate. So you'll want to remove it and attach it to hardscape with some cotton thread or a bit of superglue gel. That aside, your plants look healthy.

What do you mean about waiting on your pH? Has your tank been cycled with an ammonia source? Generally, you dose about 3-4ppm ammonia and keep the tank at that concentration throughout the "cycling" process. Nitrite eventually shows up and then Nitrate. Once your tank can process 3-4ppm ammonia in less than a day and there's no detectible Nitrite remaining, your tank is cycled and ready to support critter life.
I read and was told to wait till the ph matches from both tanks as to not shock the fish. The PH is a bit higher in the planted tank so I'm waiting on it to drop.
 

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I read and was told to wait till the ph matches from both tanks as to not shock the fish. The PH is a bit higher in the planted tank so I'm waiting on it to drop.
Is the tank 'cycled', though? If not, you'd need to go through that process before it can support life. If your tank is cycled and hardness is the same in both tanks, it's probably not a big deal at all. But if parameters are different in each tank but still acceptable/kinda close, you could just drip acclimate.

That said - pH isn't that big of a deal. it's kH and gH - hardness - that is most important. How far off is the pH? What are the other water parameters? Ammonia? Nitrite? Nitrate? kH? gH?

That looks like a 55gal - is it? What kind and how many fish will you be moving over?

About fertilizer - how much are you dosing and how frequently? You can probably get away with just using root tabs. And the Anubias definitely needs to be unplanted.
 

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Your sword may either a) get mad and bust through the pot or b) have it's roots strangled by the pot- I'd suggest a little bit bigger of one of you want to use this method and makes sure to root tab it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is the tank 'cycled', though? If not, you'd need to go through that process before it can support life. If your tank is cycled and hardness is the same in both tanks, it's probably not a big deal at all. But if parameters are different in each tank but still acceptable/kinda close, you could just drip acclimate.

That said - pH isn't that big of a deal. it's kH and gH - hardness - that is most important. How far off is the pH? What are the other water parameters? Ammonia? Nitrite? Nitrate? kH? gH?

That looks like a 55gal - is it? What kind and how many fish will you be moving over?

About fertilizer - how much are you dosing and how frequently? You can probably get away with just using root tabs. And the Anubias definitely needs to be unplanted.
Fish Tank 36gal
PH: 7.2
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 20

Plant Tank 55gal
PH: 7.4
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0.50
Nitrate: 5.0

I'm using a capful of flourish a week (followed directions) and root tabs in the pots.

Moving around 13 fish.
Rainbow Shark
2 Adult Mollies and 3 Fry (these are currently in a smaller tank)
3 Platies
4 Danios
 

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The good news about getting a larger pot for the Sword and removing the Anubias from its pot (it will look really cool placed somewhere in or around the tree stump): you'll free up two pots for more plants! :cool:

Some easy and attractive plants you may want to consider: Cryptocoryne (various types) and Bacopa monnieri, a really simple stem plant that will flower. There are honestly tons of plants you can choose, of course.

Those parameters are beginning to look good. Are you dosing an ammonia source in the 55 to allow bacteria to feed and grow? There's gotta be at least some ammonia source for nitrite to be present.

With a pH so close, I think your hardness/kH & gH are pretty much the same in each tank. So once the 55 is fully cycled, you can move your fish over as long as it can process about 3ppm of ammonia in a day. If it can't process that much ammonia, your fish may die because there will be an ammonia spike, nitrites will be present again and the water will be toxic. If you need tips for cycling, let us know or search "fishless cycle" here on the forum. It's an easy process and it looks like you're almost through it as it is.

Why I keep mentioning hardness: With the same/almost the same water hardness in each tank, osmotic pressure will be the same. When osmotic pressure from one tank to the next is wildly off, that's what sometimes causes shock. Doesn't look like you have anything to worry about there at all. Hardness (kH/carbonate hardness) is also what helps determine your pH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fish Tank 36gal
PH: 7.2
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 20

Plant Tank 55gal
PH: 7.4
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0.50
Nitrate: 5.0

I'm using a capful of flourish a week (followed directions) and root tabs in the pots.

Moving around 13 fish.
Rainbow Shark
2 Adult Mollies and 3 Fry (these are currently in a smaller tank)
3 Platies
4 Danios
The good news about getting a larger pot for the Sword and removing the Anubias from its pot (it will look really cool placed somewhere in or around the tree stump): you'll free up two pots for more plants! :cool:

Some easy and attractive plants you may want to consider: Cryptocoryne (various types) and Bacopa monnieri, a really simple stem plant that will flower. There are honestly tons of plants you can choose, of course.

Those parameters are beginning to look good. Are you dosing an ammonia source in the 55 to allow bacteria to feed and grow? There's gotta be at least some ammonia source for nitrite to be present.

With a pH so close, I think your hardness/kH & gH are pretty much the same in each tank. So once the 55 is fully cycled, you can move your fish over as long as it can process about 3ppm of ammonia in a day. If it can't process that much ammonia, your fish may die because there will be an ammonia spike, nitrites will be present again and the water will be toxic. If you need tips for cycling, let us know or search "fishless cycle" here on the forum. It's an easy process and it looks like you're almost through it as it is.

Why I keep mentioning hardness: With the same/almost the same water hardness in each tank, osmotic pressure will be the same. When osmotic pressure from one tank to the next is wildly off, that's what sometimes causes shock. Doesn't look like you have anything to worry about there at all. Hardness (kH/carbonate hardness) is also what helps determine your pH.
I was actually thinking about gluing the Anubias to the tree trunk next to it and then gluing some moss to those stones to grow on. I will definitely be adding more plants to the pots.

I've been putting dropping pellets in. I also have a sponge in my other filter in the fish tank so that I can add it to the new filter to help with bacteria. I had also dosed the tank with one of those quick start things to help it along too, but that was at start up. I plan on bringing the fish tank filter and adding it to this tank when I bring fish over to help as well to make sure they will be good.

Those plants sound good to me. Any other plants you think would look good in the tank you can definitely let me know. I might add some shrimp and maybe two mystery snails, but not sure yet.
 

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I was actually thinking about gluing the Anubias to the tree trunk next to it and then gluing some moss to those stones to grow on. I will definitely be adding more plants to the pots.

I've been putting dropping pellets in. I also have a sponge in my other filter in the fish tank so that I can add it to the new filter to help with bacteria. I had also dosed the tank with one of those quick start things to help it along too, but that was at start up. I plan on bringing the fish tank filter and adding it to this tank when I bring fish over to help as well to make sure they will be good.

Those plants sound good to me. Any other plants you think would look good in the tank you can definitely let me know. I might add some shrimp and maybe two mystery snails, but not sure yet.
That's good to hear about feeding the tank and having existing filter media. Once your Nitrite is at zero, you'll be good to go.

With the Anubias, you may be able to get away without gluing it. Since that stump has a bunch of openings, you may be able to put it in a position where the epiphytic roots and rhizome just hold it in place.

Lagenandra meeboldii is another one that would look great in a pot. They're similar to crypts but have really cool leaves. Easy to care for, as well.

Jungle Val is also something you may want to consider, though it will likely be tough to keep in a small pot.

I recommend scrolling through a bunch of journals in the Tank Journals section to see what kind of plants you think are cool. You'll be able to easily tell if they're low-tech/easy care plants based on the journals they're in. It's one of my favorite things to do on the forum.
 

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A simple plant that is low maint but readily grows in low tech environment is pogostemon stellatus octopus. Unlike a lot of stem plants it rarely gets unrooted or suffer from stem rot over time. Nor does it drop lower leaves. You can make it pretty bushy by trimming it now and then and if you let it grow above the water line it will produce a nice flower. I would strongly recommend this plant over jungle val. I have various types of jungle val in several tanks but it has its own issues i will not go into here.
 
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