The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is this BBA?

Tank: 72 Gallon Bowfront
Lighting: Beamswork ELF 1200
Photoperiod: 10-11 hours
Ferts: Seachem Flourish and Trace, Osmocote Plus and Iron root tabs
Flow by way of Eheim 2026, Penguin 350 and a sponge filter with air pump.
Water Parameters:
PH: 7.8
GH: 4-5
KH: 4-5
Ammonia/Nitrates: 0
Nitrate: 40

I'm still dialing the tank in. It's been up and running since Late December. I have mostly low light plants, with a few medium light plants mixed in. I managed to get rid of most of the red cyanobacteria by raising my light and cutting the photoperiod back an hour.

The tank is heavily stocked. I feed once a day, enough that my Corys get plump bellies by the time the food is gone. I have 6 Amano shrimp, 6 Otos and 5 Ghost shrimp, all of which stay fat and happy from all the algae growth. I also managed to get two different kinds of pest snails in my tank, MTS and Pond Snails.

While I would rather not see a bunch of hair algae on my plants, I'm really not the kind of hobbyists that dreads algae growth. I wouldn't mind limiting it a bit however.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
It is not BBA, but it looks like fuzz algae or the beginning of hair algae. I suggest that you lower the pH in your tank and you should be ok.

As to your snails, I would keep the MTS but get rid of the pond snails, they can do damage to your plants if they get too hungry.

good luck with your tank!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is not BBA, but it looks like fuzz algae or the beginning of hair algae. I suggest that you lower the pH in your tank and you should be ok.

As to your snails, I would keep the MTS but get rid of the pond snails, they can do damage to your plants if they get too hungry.

good luck with your tank!
Thank you for the reply. I really hope it isn't BBA.

As far as PH, I do changes from the tap. If I can find my old 5 gallon jugs I may use them for water changes. I could buy RO water from the store. I have 4 at 5 gallons per. That would help lower the ph some. Would I need to add an Equalibrium type conditioner to the RO water or would the tap water do the job?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
@SNAXX,

Diluting your tap water with RO water is always a good idea even though it will not have much impact on the pH value. However, it will change the KH and GH. I have come to realize that specially the GH is important for algae growth. ( A high GH value indicates that you have higher amounts of calcium and/or magnesium ions in your tank. This is typically provided by tap water. ) For example, my tap water here has a GH of 6 and a pH of 8.2, and a TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) of 280 ppm. Theses are not the best water conditions for tropical fish (except my cichlids).

If you want the best conditions for a planted you need to keep the GH low and the pH between 6.0 to 6.8, preferred is 6.5. This is usually accomplished by adding CO2 which will automatically lower your pH to ~6.5, since dissolved CO2 is a weak acid and it is needed by all photosynthesizing plants.

For a low-tech tank you have a variety of alternatives. You don't really need to buy any Equilibrium-type water conditioners (rich in phosphate) to control pH and promote plant grow. Excel (glutaraldehde) is really good to promote plant grow, but less of a pH buffer.
If I need to lower the pH in any of my tanks, I typically use a 2% acetic acid (vinegar) solution that I prepare from kitchen stock. (Don't worry, plants can use vinegar).

So, I suggest that you bring the pH down to 6 - 6.5, and lower the GH to ~3 (or lower) . Your algae problems should resolve then.

Good luck.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top