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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If anyone is able to add to the this list, please do. Don't feel obliged to follow my format, but please provide a link to a picture of the plant in question to avoid confusion with geographically based names.

I feed my shrimp spinach and turnip greens fairly regularly, as well as leaves from maple and oak trees from time to time, but recently I decided to see whether they liked common weeds and other plants that grow in my yard. The reason was both one of convenience and nutrition. It's very easy to pick some oxalis on my way into the house from my car and the nutritional content of these various plants may be able to more effectively feed shrimp than exclusively feeding spinach or turnip greens. I stuck to plants that I knew were edible for humans and were fairly widespread geographically.

Note: I do not treat my lawn in any way, and haven't for years. If you're using herbicides and insecticides and decide to feed the treated plants to your shrimp, it's on your head.

Method:
All plants were picked, rinsed, and promptly parboiled in the microwave for 1 minute. The parboiled leaves were then frozen into ice cubes for storage until testing. The leaves were offered to a small tank (3 gallons) of cherry shrimp after not feeding them for 1 day. The shrimp's immediate reaction was noted and the condition of the leaves after 12 hours and 24 hours was recorded. Leaves were removed after 24 hours. No attempt was made to standardize portion size.

Only a single test was done for each leaf type. It is entirely possible that repeated testing would reveal different results. If you try these foods and find that your shrimp react differently, please post your results on this thread. Additionally, some of the plants took much longer to be consumed than others simply because of the quantity available.

Results:
Apple leaves:
These were very well received. Juvenile shrimp were interested immediately, the leaf was partially consumed within a day. **A caution: Fruit trees are often treated for insects. If you do not know for certain that the tree has not been treated this season, do not use the leaves.**
Immediate: Juveniles before it hit the bottom 12h: Several shrimp 24h: Much interest, leaf partially consumed. 2 days: Gone

Clover - White: Surprisingly little interest.
Immediate: Investigated but ignored 12h: Untouched 24h: Untouched

Dandelion - Young: Dandelion leaves less than 2" in length were chosen. These were very well received by the shrimp and were completely eaten within an hour. Their response to young dandelion leaves was on par to their response to spinach or turnip greens.
Immediate: High interest 12h: Completely consumed 24h: -

Dandelion - Old: Sections of dandelion leaves with length greater than 5" were chosen. Little interest.
Immediate: High initial interest 12h: Almost untouched 24h: Almost untouched

Grape: Smaller leaves were chosen, less than 4" across. These were very well received and were eaten much more like a tree leaf than a spinach leaf. Aside from young dandelion leaves, these were by far the most popular of the plants I tried.
Immediate: High interest 12h: Numerous shrimp eating 24h: Almost consumed, many shrimp still eating (I let them finish it, as it seemed mean to take away the leaf while they were enjoying it so much.)

Oxalis: Also known as wood sorrel. These were eaten, but there was not the initial rush to devour them that was seen with dandelions and grapes. A small quantity was used, so it is hard to compare the response to something like a grape leaf.
Immediate: Little interest 12h: Almost consumed 24h: Consumed

Broadleaf Plantain - Young and Old: Two separate tests were done with broadleaf plantains (which are not closely related to the tropical bananas of the same name.) Both were underwhelming.
Immediate: Swarmed by juvenile shrimp 12h: Almost untouched 24h: Almost untouched

Raspberry leaves: Ignored initially, devoured later. I left this in the tank for a few days and it wound up being thoroughly enjoyed. The shrimp treated it much more like a tree leaf than a spinach leaf.
Immediate: Some interest 12h: Untouched 24h: Untouched 4 days: Gone

Rose leaves:
Rose leaves are fairly thick, so I expected them to be treated as a tree leaf. There was a surprising amount of interest in the leaf as soon as it was in the water, however, and the shrimp were still nibbling at it 24 hours later. Four days out, it was consumed completely. **A caution: Roses are some of the most heavily treated plants people keep in their gardens. If you are uncertain about whether a rose bush has been treated, do not use the leaves.**
Immediate: Moderate interest 12h: Appearance unchanged, shrimp still interested 24h: Some holes, shrimp still interested 4 days: Gone

Rose Petal: Very difficult to sink, devoured once it hit bottom. My shrimp rarely swim up to floating food, so there was no surprise when this didn't attract a lot of interest while bumping around at the top of the tank. Gone in a couple of hours once it hit bottom. Times are from when it finally sank. Next spring I hope to test apple, pear, and multiflora rose petals, all closely related plants. **A caution: Roses are some of the most heavily treated plants people keep in their gardens. If you are uncertain about whether a rose bush has been treated, do not use the petals. I personally would avoid any and all commercially purchased flower petals as well.**
Immediate: Frenzy 12h: Gone 24h: Still Gone :)

Wild Strawberry: Very surprising, but these were completely ignored.
Immediate: No interest 12h: Untouched 24h: Untouched

Analysis: By far the best received plants from my backyard were grape leaves, rose petals, and young dandelion leaves. Oxalis leaves were also consumed completely. The introduction of these leaves, especially grape leaves, which can easily be dried and stored through the winter, should provide some additional variety to my shrimp's diet.

Plants I would like to try but was unable to find in my yard:
Chickweed
Lamb's Quarters (I'd probably eat this one myself rather than giving it to the shrimp...)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Young dandelions are pretty tasty. Actually, aside from clover and strawberry leaves, these are all plants that I frequently pick to eat myself. The lamb's quarters are incredibly good for a weed (and they're usually the first plants that come up in a garden, though not usually on purpose,) and I know a lot of people like chickweed as well, but that isn't a crazy grower here like it is a little farther south.
 

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We juice dandelions with other veggies in our jucier. I also feed B.A.R.F (Bones and Raw Food) to my dogs. It a great "Old World" tonic. That's actually how the dandelion got here from Europe.
 

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Young dandelions are pretty tasty. Actually, aside from clover and strawberry leaves, these are all plants that I frequently pick to eat myself. The lamb's quarters are incredibly good for a weed (and they're usually the first plants that come up in a garden, though not usually on purpose,) and I know a lot of people like chickweed as well, but that isn't a crazy grower here like it is a little farther south.
+1 Wild violets are another good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Several additions for anyone who is interested. Tested raspberry leaves, apple leaves, rose leaves, and rose petals. With all of these plants I would recommend extra caution, as they are frequently treated for pests with long lasting, seasonal insecticides. I have no evidence that these would hurt shrimp, but it seems a likely outcome, at least for some insecticides.
 

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I remember growing up and eating dinner at my grandma's house. She always had dandelion salads. As long as its young fresh leaves its good. But I was was thinking I have a cherry, plumb, and black berrys I just might give a try. I guess tomorrow I will have to get some and give it a try.
 

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Oh wow thanks for documenting this! I need to try these on my shrimp next spring when they start to regrow again. Until then it's organic leafy greens from whole foods.
 

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Dandelion leaves are fairly nutritious... basically on par with other "greens," such as turnip greens, kale and collards. After the Civil War, during Reconstruction, much of the South's population were destitute and ill-fed. These readily available greens like dandelion and "poke salad" (which are toxic if not prepared correctly), became a routine staple in the diets of poorer Southerners, both black and white. All that's needed is a little bit of salt pork to season the greens during cooking.

Many Southerners, from 1865 to today, consider "beans and greens" to be a good meal, if both are seasoned with pork and served with cornbread. I am in this category, myself... History lesson is over. Go back to watching your shrimp.
 
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