The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I have not been having too much success with any plants that are growing towards the back of my tank. I have a 20G tank with one 20" Finnex Planted + 24/7. I have Monte carlo and staurogyne repens that have been growing fine. These two plants are located at teh front/mid sections of the tank. My back plants Rotala SP Green, Rotala Rotundifolia, Pogostemon erectus, bacopa and penthorum are all not growing great, with the Rotala SP Green showing signs of a potential deficiency? The Rotala SP Green used to grow very well, but has been struggling lately with small leaves, and browning/ holes on some of the leaves. I have attached a picture of the issue:

IMG_20170922_1650261.jpg

My water parameters are listed below, this was the parameters right before a water change. I have since reduced the dosage of macro due to the high nitrates/ phosphates.

TDS: 280
Phosphate: 10
GH: 5
KH: 4
PH: 6.4
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 40/80

I run pressurised co2, which is green by the time the light turns on. The light is on for 6 hours at max setting. I have also moved the light towards the back of the tank more so to try and help with light penetration. I am unsure what path to take to grow my background plants better, especially the Rotala SP Green. I can add more pictures if needed. Any help would be appreciated, thanks
 

·
Registered
No tank right now :( :( :(
Joined
·
3,329 Posts
don't let it get that thick on the bottom

nlewis is right in that you should hack them down and replant. I would recommend not planting them so close to begin with and having them grow out to be bushy. maybe one plant every few inches. if you plant really thick at the start some plants will 'lose' and start to really struggle while others take over and look nice. maintain these things proactively and totally remove any plants that are getting beaten out and struggling. the ones that take over and really start to take off will form your entire bush and look nice.

this is my experience with stems like rotala at least. when it gets really thick the bottoms look like crap and eventually it gets so out of control you need to replant. requires constant maintenance to keep things in shape (part of the reason I ditched stem plants).

basically IMO it is pretty unreasonable to expect 100% of the plants in a dense bush like that to look great. if this is your ultimate goal I wish you the best of luck lol

also this is why in most scapes background plants like stems are placed in a way so that only the upper parts are visible ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Yep, hack them down and replant the tops.
I have been doing this once they eventually grow healthy tops, which is usually the ones close to the surface. Would I need a stronger light to allow them to grow more dense/ taller? My Pogostemon erectus struggles to grow even though it is not being overshadowed also, I’m not too sure if this is due to lower light reaching the plants at the back of the tank or what.

don't let it get that thick on the bottom

nlewis is right in that you should hack them down and replant. I would recommend not planting them so close to begin with and having them grow out to be bushy. maybe one plant every few inches. if you plant really thick at the start some plants will 'lose' and start to really struggle while others take over and look nice. maintain these things proactively and totally remove any plants that are getting beaten out and struggling. the ones that take over and really start to take off will form your entire bush and look nice.

this is my experience with stems like rotala at least. when it gets really thick the bottoms look like crap and eventually it gets so out of control you need to replant. requires constant maintenance to keep things in shape (part of the reason I ditched stem plants).

basically IMO it is pretty unreasonable to expect 100% of the plants in a dense bush like that to look great. if this is your ultimate goal I wish you the best of luck lol

also this is why in most scapes background plants like stems are placed in a way so that only the upper parts are visible ;)
Will definatly be doing that more often thanks both for the advice there! I think next WC I will remove all the small/ dying stems and start a fresh with the healthy tops, this way they can get more light and can be spread out more like you suggested. I used to have a fairly dense bush it just seemed to die off, i maybe let it grow too high and it started struggling, something I need to maintain better :) I is definatly my goal to have a fairly dense background plants to fill the back portion of the tank, but I guess i need to be reasonable and expect crappy leaves lower down the stem, i will just have to be creative in hiding them like most do ;)
 

·
A.K.A. Fish Room Bum
Joined
·
715 Posts
It also looks like you planted the s.repens and Monte Carlo first?

This is so ironic as the struggle is usually the reverse. Rotalia and stem plants take off and prevent the light from getting to the lower lying carpet plants. If your Monte Carlo is growing well like this and you trim back the plants (not to repeat things), but you should give yourself a pat on the back. So many people struggle with Monte Carlo. At the end of the day, I agree with what someone else also said about ditching stem plants. They are nice but you really have to keep up with your tank if you want to have both stem and carpet plant in a small tank (this is where experience pays off) or... you have to pay attention and keep this tank well groomed and space the plants apart so that the light can get in! Looks like your light and ferts are working well otherwise.

Which substrate are you using and do you have fish in this tank?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It also looks like you planted the s.repens and Monte Carlo first?

This is so ironic as the struggle is usually the reverse. Rotalia and stem plants take off and prevent the light from getting to the lower lying carpet plants. If your Monte Carlo is growing well like this and you trim back the plants (not to repeat things),but you should give yourself a pat on the back. So many people struggle with Monte Carlo. At the end of the day, I agree with what someone else also said about ditching stem plants. They are nice but you really have to keep up with your tank if you want to have both stem and carpet plant in a small tank (this is where experience pays off) or... you have to pay attention and keep this tank well groomed and space the plants apart so that the light can get in! Looks like your light and frets are working well otherwise.

Which substrate are you using and do you have fish in this tank?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The Monte Carlo, Repens and the Rotala SP Green were planted first.

Thanks for that, I’m all for criticism, I am here to learn :) I have attached a picture of the most recent FTS I have. This was when I had a bad GHA outbreak, it is nearly all gone now thankfully. I was struggling with the Monte carlo at the start, it kept melting and my Rummynose tetras used to nibble it (Which now thinking about it was potentially due to the leaves dying?) But I brought some more pots and gave it another try, and thankfully it started growing in after the initial melt!



FTS_1.jpg

I will for sure keep trimming the rotala often! In the picture I attached that was before I had trimmed it. I am all for keeping up with the tank to get a nice look in the end, the thing that is weird is how the Rotala used to grow like a weed now it struggles as mentioned in a post above. Maybe that is due to my bad trimming or lack of.

The substrate I am using is ADA Amazonia Power. Yup have a mix of Rummynose, tetras, Otos and two Amano shrimp.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top