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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I've got a Dutch scape where I inject co2 to about 30ppm. I have another aquarium with no co2. When I transfer the olive nerites to the Dutch scape, after a day or two, they retreat into their shells. Some have even died eventually.

Originally I thought it was the high levels of nitrate in the scape. With it being more established now and the new filter for better circulation, the nitrate stays very low. The snails however still show that same tendency to retreat into the shells.

If I move them back to the non co2 scape, they eventually recover.

Does anyone else sew this behavior in their snails?

I should mention that my tetras, Amanos, and ramshorn snails all seem okay in the scape. It's just an issue with the nerites.
 

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I have never witnessed that with nerites specifically related to co2, only stress or starvation.

However, every single time I've tried fancy snails in my co2 injected tank, they die prematurely because their shells don't fare too well. I've been thinking about trying it once more now that I'm using a reactor instead of atomizer to see if shells slowly dissolving is because of contact with pure co2 bubbles/mist or if it's simply because of higher levels of co2 in the water.

I know it's not my water as the nerites in non-co2 setups do just fine, shell wise.
 

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It's indirectly tied to the co2 injection. The co2 forms carbonic acid in the water, that's why the ph lowers as you increase the co2 concentration in the water. The lower ph definitely will erode and eventually kill snails. When I started injecting co2 heavily I saw first hand the shells eroding and my population dwindled and disappeared. I only recently set up another Cherry Shrimp and Ramshorn tank and started breeding some snails so I have snails again, but based on my previous experience I don't think I'm going to add them to the main planted tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have never witnessed that with nerites specifically related to co2, only stress or starvation.

However, every single time I've tried fancy snails in my co2 injected tank, they die prematurely because their shells don't fare too well. I've been thinking about trying it once more now that I'm using a reactor instead of atomizer to see if shells slowly dissolving is because of contact with pure co2 bubbles/mist or if it's simply because of higher levels of co2 in the water.

I know it's not my water as the nerites in non-co2 setups do just fine, shell wise.
It's indirectly tied to the co2 injection. The co2 forms carbonic acid in the water, that's why the ph lowers as you increase the co2 concentration in the water. The lower ph definitely will erode and eventually kill snails. When I started injecting co2 heavily I saw first hand the shells eroding and my population dwindled and disappeared. I only recently set up another Cherry Shrimp and Ramshorn tank and started breeding some snails so I have snails again, but based on my previous experience I don't think I'm going to add them to the main planted tank.
So in these cases, it's tied to the shell health, but woukd you expect to see a decline in health within 48 hours as I see in my scape with co2?
 

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Hi guys,

I've got a Dutch scape where I inject co2 to about 30ppm. I have another aquarium with no co2. When I transfer the olive nerites to the Dutch scape, after a day or two, they retreat into their shells. Some have even died eventually.

Originally I thought it was the high levels of nitrate in the scape. With it being more established now and the new filter for better circulation, the nitrate stays very low. The snails however still show that same tendency to retreat into the shells.

If I move them back to the non co2 scape, they eventually recover.

Does anyone else sew this behavior in their snails?

I should mention that my tetras, Amanos, and ramshorn snails all seem okay in the scape. It's just an issue with the nerites.
I've used a lot of Olives over the years and usually if water parameters get bad they leave the water...
Never seen that w/ CO2 though BUT I don't inject t your levels.



The shell erosion as mentioned above seems relatively common though I believe even w/ CO2 if your Kh is higher that can combat that a bit..
I add limestone chips in the hope that it combats the acidity effects a bit..they do increase my Kh a bit which at times was almost nill.

That said most don't live more than about 1-1 1/2 years..
Freshwater really isn't their home.


Funny little guys can't really right themselves easily either..
Apparently they can sort of go dormant for awhile though I've never seen that.
Had a big apple snail do that 3 times except never woke up the 3rd time.. :(



My tanks have been fairly acidic.. matter of fact few were rarely over 7 at rest ..


Guy on evil bay sells them from New Orleans really cheap so I'd just buy a batch every now and then.

fossilneoceratodus
SADLY seems "off line" atm.


Good thing for you is at least they didn't die..


Sorry I know... not much help.


The attractive shell of marble-sized olive nerite is often colonized by tiny barnacles, adding to its interesting appearance. They are as resilient to environmental conditions as they are to habitat changes, doing well at temperatures ranging from the upper 40’s to the upper 90’s (F) and in waters of 6.3-8.4 in pH.

Most list the lower limit in the low 6's but not sure how many are repeating the same info..
 

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Two nerites in my tank with pressurised co2 diffusion. One of them stays at the water line once the pH starts dropping and comes down only after co2 is shutoff and aeration starts. The other one does not bother at all.


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