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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So to my understanding the bulbs that come in the by default have a a wide spectrum of wavelength spikes that might not necessarily be best suited for a planted tank.

http://www.aquaticlife.com/sites/default/files/specsheets/420143.pdf

Although it was marketed as a great light for planted tanks, someone had pointed out that I could be getting a lot of wasted colour spikes with a 6000k and 650nm rosette bulb

Since I'm getting into co2 in the coming weeks, I want to make sure I'm getting the best possible lighting I can have to grow dwarf hairgrass and smaller mid ground plants.

Did some research (some of it way over my head) and I THINK what I read was, you can combine 2 different frequency bulbs to get the desired wavelength?

I could be wrong.

Either way, what do you guys recommend I do? Switch out one 6000 for a 6500? Get another aqualife fixture and link them?
 

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So to my understanding the bulbs that come in the by default have a a wide spectrum of wavelength spikes that might not necessarily be best suited for a planted tank.

http://www.aquaticlife.com/sites/default/files/specsheets/420143.pdf

Although it was marketed as a great light for planted tanks, someone had pointed out that I could be getting a lot of wasted colour spikes with a 6000k and 650nm rosette bulb

Since I'm getting into co2 in the coming weeks, I want to make sure I'm getting the best possible lighting I can have to grow dwarf hairgrass and smaller mid ground plants.

Did some research (some of it way over my head) and I THINK what I read was, you can combine 2 different frequency bulbs to get the desired wavelength?

I could be wrong.

Either way, what do you guys recommend I do? Switch out one 6000 for a 6500? Get another aqualife fixture and link them?
all fluorescent have "wasted" color spikes so to speak..

can (you) combine 2 different frequency bulbs to get the desired wavelength?
If I understand the question.. no..

I see nothing wrong w/ your lighting scheme.. You could go w/ a higher K in the one bulb 10000k vs 6500k but that will be more of a look decision..

I've only seen one Flourescent that had a "flat" spectrum but I do not remember the company (German I believe)

This MAY be it..



For comparison..

I don't know how these work in practice though.. (either one)

ALSO I'm not sure Agrosun (or an equiv. clone) comes in t5 .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I see nothing wrong w/ your lighting scheme.. You could go w/ a higher K in the one bulb 10000k vs 6500k but that will be more of a look decision..
Okay thank you for reading that long winded question.

The fixture has a 6000 and the pink bulb. So my plan was to get 2 6500 instead.

I'm switching from pea gravel this weekend and I want the dwarf hair grass to grow successfully, just want to make sure the light is what it needs to be at.

Thanks again
 

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Okay thank you for reading that long winded question.

The fixture has a 6000 and the pink bulb. So my plan was to get 2 6500 instead.

I'm switching from pea gravel this weekend and I want the dwarf hair grass to grow successfully, just want to make sure the light is what it needs to be at.

Thanks again
seems counterproductive .. unless you don't like the color..
AquaticLife T5 HO 650nm Roseate Fluorescent Lamps emit light that closely matches the chlorophyll absorption peak in the red spectrum. Also enhances the red and orange coloration in tropical aquarium fish for a vibrant aquarium display. Use with 6,000°K lamps for ideal illumination of freshwater planted aquariums.




I know that is a marketing blurb.. but I have a tendency to agree w/ it..
 

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seems counterproductive .. unless you don't like the color..
I would agree with jeffkrol on this one. A fixture with a 6000k and 650nm bulb is sufficient for growing plants. To your eyes it may seem darker because the 650nm bulb is putting out more red and blue with less yellow, when compared to the 6000k as shown above on the graphs. It's important to realize that a major factor in your ability to grow plants with this will be your tank size (particularly height) as well as the balance between light/ferts/CO2. At the end of the day you can switch out the bulbs to whatever is more visually appealing to you. Personally I find that just 6500k looks more blue than my liking and I wouldn't consider 10,000k because the color looks washed out to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys! It makes my life easier if I dont have to change anything. Im hopping this will be enough light for co2 when I get it next week.

Dont know if this pic helps


(Dont worry the pea gravel will be gone by Friday - getting eco complete tomorrow)

@MadRiverPat the aquarium is 29gal. 30" long, 18" tall 12" wide.

Some people tell me I have high light, I've put all my specs into a light calculator, which I believe I downloaded from this form and it tells me medium light.

Such a headache at this point!
 

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You know, there is a lot of speculation on light intensity because there are different quality reflectors and bulbs lose intensity over time and then there is the debate on light loss through glass tops and it goes on and on. You will be able to tell how much light you need based on how your plants react. I would say that CO2 will be important to establishing a good carpet. Never had any success carpeting DHG in my tanks but I haven't tried it with a pressurized system yet. I have the same fixture on my 40 breeder which is ~17" tall and consider my set up to be medium light. Some charts will say that I have high light but I don't run CO2 and haven't had a problem. Anyway, enough rambling, I'm excited to see how your tank progresses!
 
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