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Just curious if anyone uses aquasoil with hard water.

I understand why one would rodi water, just looking for feedback as currently an rodi system is not possible for me. I’ve always used inert substrates to midgate large ph/kh swings. I’ve had no issues growing plants with this method, just want to dip my toes into something high tech.

my tap (after gassed off)
Consistently has the following readings:
PH: 8.2pmm
GH: 300ppm
KH: 80ppm

granted, it’s not absurdly high, although I would suspect I’d have trouble with stability during water changes with something like Amazonia or Tropcia aqua soil. An RODI unit may be the way to go. If anyone has similar parameters and uses aquasoil with success, please feel free to share.
 

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I used to use tropica's aquarium soil with regular tap water. Pretty much stripped the water of any hardness. I only ever did very small water changes. And I've since changed out the aquasoil for inert substrate, since it was just causing me too much worry 😅
 

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Just curious if anyone uses aquasoil with hard water.

I understand why one would rodi water, just looking for feedback as currently an rodi system is not possible for me. I’ve always used inert substrates to midgate large ph/kh swings. I’ve had no issues growing plants with this method, just want to dip my toes into something high tech.

my tap (after gassed off)
Consistently has the following readings:
PH: 8.2pmm
GH: 300ppm
KH: 80ppm

granted, it’s not absurdly high, although I would suspect I’d have trouble with stability during water changes with something like Amazonia or Tropcia aqua soil. An RODI unit may be the way to go. If anyone has similar parameters and uses aquasoil with success, please feel free to share.
Here's my standard spiel: Use the search function. It's your friend. Do some reading. You'll be surprised to learn there are thousands of people who have done exactly what you want to do. For real - search. Check out some journals in the Tank Journals section. It's like letting someone else do the experiment so you don't have to.

With that out of the way... Active substrates like ADA Aqua Soil were developed because not everyone in the planted tank hobby has access to soft and acidic tap water. And those who do enjoy parameter stability with sensitive plants and critters. The problem you'll run into is eventually exhausting buffering capacity of the substrate much more quickly than you would using RO/DI water with no kH.

Using tap won't cause wild parameter swings. kH will be stripped from the water slowly, over the course of hours or a day. If your water changes aren't massive, it won't be a big deal. Also helpful if you don't keep super-sensitive critters.

But real talk? Sometimes easier is better. Because active substrates (I prefer ADA) aren't cheap, I like to get as much bang for my buck as possible. So I use RO/DI water remineralized with my own dry salts to each tank's specifications. Way easier. No headaches. I know exactly what's going into my tanks, don't have to stress about tap contaminates or even slight parameter shifts.

Decent RO/DI systems (5 or 6 stages) are available in the US for $100 or so - even cheaper in some parts of Asia. Most hobbyists find it's worthwhile to save up if necessary. Opens up a whole new world of tank possibilities. And they're useful for non-tank stuff, too.
 

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Here's my standard spiel: Use the search function. It's your friend. Do some reading. You'll be surprised to learn there are thousands of people who have done exactly what you want to do. For real - search. Check out some journals in the Tank Journals section. It's like letting someone else do the experiment so you don't have to.

With that out of the way... Active substrates like ADA Aqua Soil were developed because not everyone in the planted tank hobby has access to soft and acidic tap water. And those who do enjoy parameter stability with sensitive plants and critters. The problem you'll run into is eventually exhausting buffering capacity of the substrate much more quickly than you would using RO/DI water with no kH.

Using tap won't cause wild parameter swings. kH will be stripped from the water slowly, over the course of hours or a day. If your water changes aren't massive, it won't be a big deal. Also helpful if you don't keep super-sensitive critters.

But real talk? Sometimes easier is better. Because active substrates (I prefer ADA) aren't cheap, I like to get as much bang for my buck as possible. So I use RO/DI water remineralized with my own dry salts to each tank's specifications. Way easier. No headaches. I know exactly what's going into my tanks, don't have to stress about tap contaminates or even slight parameter shifts.

Decent RO/DI systems (5 or 6 stages) are available in the US for $100 or so - even cheaper in some parts of Asia. Most hobbyists find it's worthwhile to save up if necessary. Opens up a whole new world of tank possibilities. And they're useful for non-tank stuff, too.
What he said.....⬆⬆⬆⬆⬆⬆⬆:D
 

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Here's my standard spiel: Use the search function. It's your friend. Do some reading. You'll be surprised to learn there are thousands of people who have done exactly what you want to do. For real - search. Check out some journals in the Tank Journals section. It's like letting someone else do the experiment so you don't have to.

With that out of the way... Active substrates like ADA Aqua Soil were developed because not everyone in the planted tank hobby has access to soft and acidic tap water. And those who do enjoy parameter stability with sensitive plants and critters. The problem you'll run into is eventually exhausting buffering capacity of the substrate much more quickly than you would using RO/DI water with no kH.

Using tap won't cause wild parameter swings. kH will be stripped from the water slowly, over the course of hours or a day. If your water changes aren't massive, it won't be a big deal. Also helpful if you don't keep super-sensitive critters.

But real talk? Sometimes easier is better. Because active substrates (I prefer ADA) aren't cheap, I like to get as much bang for my buck as possible. So I use RO/DI water remineralized with my own dry salts to each tank's specifications. Way easier. No headaches. I know exactly what's going into my tanks, don't have to stress about tap contaminates or even slight parameter shifts.

Decent RO/DI systems (5 or 6 stages) are available in the US for $100 or so - even cheaper in some parts of Asia. Most hobbyists find it's worthwhile to save up if necessary. Opens up a whole new world of tank possibilities. And they're useful for non-tank stuff, too.
100% agree with you, though as I just setup my RO/DI setup, there is overhead regarding how large your tank is and how much water you need to change each time. Making 50 gallons of RODI takes a good amount of time, and if you pre-make it, you need to have a container and space for that container.

And then the additional effort to set it up somewhere that doesnt totally aggravate you and gets water all over the place, etc.
 

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100% agree with you, though as I just setup my RO/DI setup, there is overhead regarding how large your tank is and how much water you need to change each time. Making 50 gallons of RODI takes a good amount of time, and if you pre-make it, you need to have a container and space for that container.

And then the additional effort to set it up somewhere that doesnt totally aggravate you and gets water all over the place, etc.
Can't tell how many times I flooded the kitchen with ro/ waste water. Made a auto shut off in a trash can in my garage finally and can't believe I waited so long to do this.
 

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100% agree with you, though as I just setup my RO/DI setup, there is overhead regarding how large your tank is and how much water you need to change each time. Making 50 gallons of RODI takes a good amount of time, and if you pre-make it, you need to have a container and space for that container.

And then the additional effort to set it up somewhere that doesnt totally aggravate you and gets water all over the place, etc.
Pbbbt. I've gotten water all over the place even without RO/DI systems! But good point.

I just keep my water stored in Brute trash cans under a shelf in my fish room. Before I had a fish room, I kept them out in the open. Covered with a tablecloth and disguised as a table. Also had a bucket that lived in my bathroom linen closet.

When I say I had things out in the open? I mean I lived in a literal tiny house of a condo. Way under 400sq ft. So if I can do it, nearly anybody can do it.

As for my RO/DI filters? I stash them either under the bathroom sink or kitchen sink. Keep them in a position that allows them to be slid out when needed. Just pull the tubes out and stick them on the faucet. Tape the waste water down on the sink or on a container if I'm saving it. Feeds into my gray water system in my fish room. But the others I've always just manually saved the waste or allowed it to go down the drain.

If you have an efficient system, it won't take too long to make water. I make 40-50 gallons at a time and just store it til I need it. Personal preference is to be present as the water's being filtered so I can monitor the system and immediately deal with any leaks. Doing other stuff while I wait, of course, with a timer set on my watch/phone to remind me to look up.

There are fancier ways to do things - like auto shut-off valves, space-efficient storage containers, tapped pipes, auto mixers. But I find part of the fun for me is actually making everything myself. Fortunately for people who don't like the physical aspect of it, the fancy stuff is cheap compared to the filter. Valves are cheap, the fanciest of 50gal containers is cheap.

Oh - forgot to add something important. When it comes to mixing water, I keep a cheap pump suction cupped to the bottom of whatever container I'm using. Usually has a hose barb attached with a length of tubing I can hold at whatever tank I'm filling. Makes the water mixing process fast and refilling tanks easy.
 
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