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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I attached some of my java ferns and annubias to some pieces of drift wood (didn't soak them first). I was wondering what type of metal is safe to put in aquariums so that I can either put a screw in each piece or I was thinking maybe fishing weights. Any input?? Thanks

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Titanium or platinum are the only truly inert metals, though I have heard stainless steel works. Just keep in mind water is the universal solvent, and stainless means it will stain less, not that it is magically corrosion proof. any solution involving plastic will be better, but again it depends on the type of plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. This will only be temporary, I just want to weigh them down long enough to become water logged.

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galvanised hmmm zinc who knows what else, bad idea
There is practically no leaching of zinc from the galvinization process. Even if left in the tank for years the zinc wouldn't accumulate to anything near detrimental... then if your doing water changes there's even less to worry about.

I've never experienced a problem with it, though I've just started keep plants. At any rate I can safely say from experience that fish aren't sensitive to it (at least the species I've kept.)
 

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Free zinc ions are definitely toxic, as is Zinc Oxide, one of the stages of galvinization. The finished product is zinc carbonate.

I have enough experience to safely say it will not negatively affect your fish if you do a monthly 10% water change. I'm also confident that it will not harm your fish with fewer water changes.

They're shouldn't be any other metals mixed in because the zinc carbonate finish is what you're actually after... it's what makes the bolts and nails look dull grey. Other metals would generate a different compound and negate the purpose of galvinization.

No worries either way... there are other methods to accomplish the same goal. :)
 

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hmmmmm sound like you know more then me
do you have any idea what the effect of carbonic acid is on zinc carbonate
lime calcium , phosphates nitrates etc
what is the purity of this zinc carbonate compound when applied steel
 

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hmmmmm sound like you know more then me
do you have any idea what the effect of carbonic acid is on zinc carbonate
lime calcium , phosphates nitrates etc
what is the purity of this zinc carbonate compound when applied steel
As far as I know it is pure molten zinc with some lead mixed in to promote the fluidity in coating. I'm not sure of the exact % but in my experience it seems no different than the lead weights used to keep plants down.

this lead, since its mixed with the zinc leaches very little.

I'm not sure about carbonic acid, to be honest. Lime Calcium would generally have no effect in aquarium use and I wouldn't expect any difference with phosphates, nitrates, etc. Galvanization is meant to me highly non-corrosive so in terms of general aquarium use I wouldn't expect any problems.
 

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well to keep this going hahaha , carbonic acid is a major ingredient in planted tanks
lead that doesn't sound good ether
certain shrimp and mosses are highly sensitive to heavy medals
lead weights for plants are almost pure lead. not generally ruled safe
 

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Well, keeping in mind that galvanization's purpose is to prevent corrosion in a great many situations. With this is mind if the lead leeches that means the galvanization is pointless.
But still I can understand being weary if your dealing with shrimp and moss.

Carbonic acid is common enough that I highly doubt it will affect it. I mean we're just talking about CO2, yes I know it's technically H2CO3 but once infused into the water it's just regular old CO2. And while I don't have any practical experience I would be amazingly surprised if the CO2 levels used in plant growth broke down the zinc.
 

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chrome.. same principal as stainless steel. stainless means it has 4 % or more of magnesium bonded to the surface which is corrosion resistant. the higher the level the more "stainless it is" this is how we get different grades of stainless steel.

chrome IS HIGHLY corrosion resistant. i doubt however you want to load up ur fish tank with chrome as its ery expensive
 

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chrome.. same principal as stainless steel. stainless means it has 4 % or more of magnesium bonded to the surface which is corrosion resistant. the higher the level the more "stainless it is" this is how we get different grades of stainless steel.

chrome IS HIGHLY corrosion resistant. i doubt however you want to load up ur fish tank with chrome as its ery expensive
Not getting this one? Other than complete error or lack of knowledge. I've made my living welding, nothing is bonded to the surface of the metal. Chrome and nickle content throughout the material is how stainless is graded. I'll post it again, anything 316L will be here long after you're gone.

Chroming used to be a high dollar, durable finish. When it was a copper, nickle, then chrome used in the process you had something. Now it's 3-5yrs max life. Chrome is a barrier finish that only lasts as long as the finish is not breached. Once breached the base metal (aluminum, carbon steel etc.) oxidizes, rusts or corrodes (pick your term).

Not really understanding the debate on the topic that's developed here as this is not that complicated. Use grade #316 stainless and forget about ever second guessing the choice.
 
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