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Aquarium-related health issues

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I'm planning a talk on for the local fish club on aquarium-related health issues. Wanted to see if anyone had some suggestions for me.

So far I'm looking at organizing it in this way:

1) physical (electrocution, drowning, cuts/puncture wounds)

2) chemical (contact reactions, allergic reactions, poisoning)

3) biological (water-borne infections, zoonoses)

for the 2nd category, there's the bloodworm allergies, reported duckweed allergies (gotta look this up myself), allergic reactions to crypts and anubias sap.

for the 3rd category, I was going to break it down to reported infections (salmonella, Aeromonas/Pseudomonas, Mycobacteria marinum (fish TB), Vibrio, Erysipelothrix insidiosa, Cercarial dermatitis) And potential infections (Giardia, Schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, Leptospirosis, Campylobacter infections, Entamoebal infections, Cryptospiridium, Typhoid, Microsporidia, Cholera, Shigella)

any suggestions/additions welcome....
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Water on the floor after bagging fish or servicing a tank can be dangerous.....falls/slipping

Medications such as formaldehyde can affect people with breathing problems....

Dodgy ladders can collapse causing bad injuries...

Cyanobacteria can cause many health related problems if exposed to it for longish periods.....

Alot of catfish have spines that may be poisonous or can get stuck in your skin and cause nasty painful infections.....I had this once when handling a Aust. native the Salmon catfish....a pectoral spine went into my finger and caused a bad infection that took about 2-3 months to heal....yuck
 

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i have an allergy to blood worms. touching it is no problem, the only thing is the powder from the freeze-dried stuff. it makes my nose runny and my eyes red, itchy, and runny (basically feels like i walked through a botanical garden). i never had a problem with frozen, or hikari bloodworms (they are smaller and harder, so they dont powder as much).

typhoid? cholera?
come on, its a tank, not a toilet. besides now people use python for water changes and dont have to suck one end of the tube (though even then you dont have to suck all the way til it hits your tounge, just past the highest point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
typhoid? cholera?
come on, its a tank, not a toilet. besides now people use python for water changes and dont have to suck one end of the tube (though even then you dont have to suck all the way til it hits your tounge, just past the highest point.
You'd be surprised how many people still use the suck method. My audience will have a significant number of people who still do that. There is still chance of infection if organism-containing water goes into the mouth - people who 'gargle' or drink water in showers during foreign travel still get dysentery/water-borne infections.

Those are under 'potential infections' for a reason - there is no documented cases of those that I came across linked to aquariums - yet. But aquarium water is basically untreated water. Imported fish are from holding tanks/facilities with local water which potentially has these in the water. With all the imported fish from Asia or from the wild, the risk is definitely still there.

The point of the talk is 'prevention', with alot of cool pics of bacteria/sores/infections to make my points :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Water on the floor after bagging fish or servicing a tank can be dangerous.....falls/slipping

Medications such as formaldehyde can affect people with breathing problems....

Dodgy ladders can collapse causing bad injuries...

Cyanobacteria can cause many health related problems if exposed to it for longish periods.....

Alot of catfish have spines that may be poisonous or can get stuck in your skin and cause nasty painful infections.....I had this once when handling a Aust. native the Salmon catfish....a pectoral spine went into my finger and caused a bad infection that took about 2-3 months to heal....yuck

Thanks for the info - I forgot about falls from wet surfaces. Another - particularly planted aquarium related - medication issue is with people with known allergies to antibiotics. The "Marycin" capsules or powders we add to treat BGA can aersolize and potentially be very dangerous if someone has a significant allergy to erythromycin.

Do you remember what organism caused your infection? Did they do wound cultures?
 

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How about strains from moving large tanks. Or bruises from tring to reach to the back of a tanks and your arms are to short. (I get in my 75 gallon up to my arm pits and still can't reach it and it sometimes well hurt for days.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How about strains from moving large tanks. Or bruises from tring to reach to the back of a tanks and your arms are to short. (I get in my 75 gallon up to my arm pits and still can't reach it and it sometimes well hurt for days.)
lol, those will be good to mention in the first category.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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you mentioned the compylobacteria and salmonella.

things like that keep me worried enough to wash my hands very good after having them around the tank, particularly well before i eat anything.

another that i wonder about are intestinal parasites, tapeworms and things. i am curious whether these are transferrable from the tank to the human. i was sitting in a hotel room in aruba while watching the discovery channel talk on intestinal worms and how easy it is for them to potentially end up in your body.. and you wouldnt even know it for a while. (makes you think about all the stuff you have been eating.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
you mentioned the compylobacteria and salmonella.

things like that keep me worried enough to wash my hands very good after having them around the tank, particularly well before i eat anything.

another that i wonder about are intestinal parasites, tapeworms and things. i am curious whether these are transferrable from the tank to the human. i was sitting in a hotel room in aruba while watching the discovery channel talk on intestinal worms and how easy it is for them to potentially end up in your body.. and you wouldnt even know it for a while. (makes you think about all the stuff you have been eating.)
the tapeworms are considered potential water-borne zoonoses. If you recall the Salmonella and hepapatitis outbreaks recently, runoff water from cattle areas to fields containing produce was the cause. The same could potentially happen with ponds/water used for fish husbandry as well.


lol, malnutrition I can see, but I doubt someone will get dehydrated looking at a bunch of money-pit aquariums ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
There isn't any documented tapeworm infections from the aquarium hobby...yet ;)
 

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Do you remember what organism caused your infection? Did they do wound cultures?
No, I don't actually know which organism caused the infection....when I told the doctor what happened he wasn't really concerned, he did say that if it turned into a really bad abcess or something nastier than what I had he said he would do a culture, funny thing is now if I accidently get spiked it dosen't turn nasty like the first time I got spiked, heh may be I have become immune to what caused my infection:)
 
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