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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'ello all! I wanted to grow some sort of lily outside in a container today, but all the traditional pond lilies that would fit in a reasonably sized pot (no wider than 2 feet in diameter) are very expensive. Thus, I am leaning towards trying to keep some sort of aquarium lily outside...

So, here's my questions:
1 - What is the minimum and maximum temperature tolerance of some common aquarium lilies? I won't be able to bury the pot, sadly :( Will not be trying fish in it this year (will need to test the temperature variations the pot undergoes first)
2 - Would putting the pot on the eastern side of the house (with morning sun and afternoon shade) work?
3 - Would any of the common aquarium lilies flower readily outdoors?

Your quick replies are much appreciated!
 

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In general, most aquarium plants sort of have a lower limit of the upper 60sF. If you have some extras, put out one as soon as the weather moderates and see how it does.
The larger the container the more stable the temperature.
While I would not put it against a south facing wall in the heat of summer, it might need more warmth than the east side of the house. It is worth a try, though.
Once the temperature moderates, add Endlers or Swordtails. They will handle a lot cooler water than many tropical fish, but you will have to monitor it as it warms up. (perhaps the east side of the house is better for this reason!)
 

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Children Boogie
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The lilies you get at the garden center are perennials. They die off in the winter but will come back in the spring as long as the tuber is alive. I forget the species name (N. American species).
Some of the lilies for the aquarium are tropical so will probably die off in the winter.
 

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I know Banana plants are native to the South East states, and do better if they have a winter period. The lily leafs and flowers are small, and a single plant can put up quite a few of them. Another option would be to do a floating plant, like Water Hyacinth or Red Root Floaters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was planning to overwinter any lilies inside...even if buried, the pot would simply not be deep enough to risk overwintering. Speaking of which...how well would any of these lilies do under potentially 16 inches of water?

(Side note...no water hyacinths for that reason - they're a pain to overwinter)
 

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Children Boogie
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I leave my lilies outside in the pond overwinter and they are fine in the spring. I'm not sure if that's what you're suppose to do but it works.

You might not want a glass aquarium with water in it overwinter though, if you're doing that. The ice will expand and crack the glass. You'd have to drain the aquarium anyway.
 

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I was planning to overwinter any lilies inside...even if buried, the pot would simply not be deep enough to risk overwintering. Speaking of which...how well would any of these lilies do under potentially 16 inches of water?

(Side note...no water hyacinths for that reason - they're a pain to overwinter)
I am considering doing Banana plants and Red Root Floaters in a pot outside this spring/summer. :icon_ques Are you just going to leave the water still, or do something for movement/filtration? One of my biggest concerns about doing this is that I'm going to create a mosquito nursery.
 
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