The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently me and my wife were looking to rent out an apartment. One particular location that were leaning towards is a single story, so no worries really about what size tank I could have there crashing through the floor. Places are available here and there though.

Most apartment complexes as I've noticed obviously are a multiple level kinda deal. Well, there's probably a limit on the size of tank I could bring there or setup. Currently I have a 55 setup which I know I probably wouldn't be able to setup.

Anybody have any ideas of what tank size is generally acceptable in apartments like this? I'm considering going down to a 30 long or 40 tall but I'm still not so sure that would be allowed either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
I think it's a good idea to ask the company you're renting from. The potential downside is that they're uneducated and will severely limit your tank size. The upside is you don't set up a tank that you have to take down later when rhey find out.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
depends on the apartment really... my complex (i live on the 3rd and top floor) has a no pet policy for apartments without carpets, which mine is. But they don't mind that I have a 25g tall setup in the corner and a 5g and a 3g on my desk. Depending on where you're looking you might be better off not asking and just doing it, at least within resason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
depends on the apartment really... my complex (i live on the 3rd and top floor) has a no pet policy for apartments without carpets, which mine is. But they don't mind that I have a 25g tall setup in the corner and a 5g and a 3g on my desk. Depending on where you're looking you might be better off not asking and just doing it, at least within resason
It should be in the lease agreement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,012 Posts
Get renters insurance and make sure it specifies aquariums, if it leaks and causes damage that can get really bad.
Worst case scenario includes saturated floor and wall leading to mold. Mold eradication is very expensive.
I have a 65 gallon tank in my ground floor apartment. I was required to get renter's insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,428 Posts
As an owner of rentals, I can assure you the most reasonable way to go is to ask. As far as weight, there is normally no problem but ask about the rest of the question. Read any agreement that you are handed in advance of signing, even on a month to month basis. If you feel rushed, do not sign it!!!
There are as many different thoughts on pets, aquariums, waterbeds and such as there are owners so the only way to find out is by asking. An honest question up front will show a willingness to follow the rules and can go a long way on being approved if you are in a tight rental market. Trying to mislead or deceive the owner/ managers is not a good way to start things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Stay ahead of the questions if you plan on renting an apartment and setting up a tank.. or 4 like I did;) thing is.. picture a 55 gallon tank on the 3rd floor of an apt building, cracks and leaks out 30 gallons of nutrient rich nasty poo water into the building. It can and most likely will cause some issues that you're not wanting to pay for.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, I spoke to the customer service at the apartment complex we are looking at. Anything over a 10 gallon tank requires renters insurance which is absolutely ridiculous. Looks like I will have to get it because I will not go anything under a 30-40 gallon tank. Too small for my liking.

Is renters insurance costly? I don't feel like having to pay an extra 100 dollars a month just so I can run my fish tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
Renters insurance is usually pretty cheap. YMMV but I got a deal and actually saved money getting renter's insurance from the same company as my car insurance.
+1

That's what I did and it only raised my car insurance by about 20 bucks, but lowered it by 11 bucks overall by bundling different types of insurance.

Renters insurance is good thing to have regardless of pets. Last year someone mistook the gas pedal for the brake pedal and literally was 6" from parking in my living room.

Also, 10 gallons is A LOT of water to just be dumped all over your floor, especially if you live above other tenets, let alone 40 gallons. I say just get your insurance and go tank crazy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
752 Posts
Renter's insurance is a lot more than what your fish tank may do to the apartment if it breaks. Renter's insurance will also cover all your personal belongings that may get damaged or destroyed, also covers you against theft or accidental damage. I have it, have had it for over 10 years, and will continue to have it as long as I rent.

That being said I would look at a 50 or a 65. You get the 36" width you are looking for, but an extra 6" depth which I feel is better for aquascaping. With a 50 or 65 you will also be staying a lot closer to that height of the 40 tall than the 40 Breeder would be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
As stated, I wouldn't try to deceive the complex or landlord in any way shape or form. If you're concerned, ask. Simple as that.

I lugged my 72 gallon bowfront and 55g all over the place to three or four complexes in Ohio and never asked because I was never concerned. I had renter's insurance and anything 75g or less I just don't think is a concern unless in a old building w/construction concerns or not kept on a load bearing wall (the lease also didn't mention anything). The landlords always ended up (and will ALWAYS end up at some point) in my apartment and they never had an issue with it either.

Over that size, I would bring it up as it would be a concern to me then--especially not on the first floor.

I'm in an old house right now, and I've actually went under the house to check the floor joist and everything was in great shape, I'm actually thinking of reinforcing the floor anyways although the 90g is doing fine. Nothing worse than having to worry... at least get the insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
I agree with getting renter's insurance. I have it, and it's currently ~$30 per month here in Los Angeles. You'll want it anyway for more than just potential water damage -- fire, break in, troop of insane clowns. My apartment is ground floor, but sits over an underground garage. I have a 20-long right now, which of course isn't a problem, but I'm also going to add sometime soon a 40-breeder. At about 450 lbs, including stand, it shouldn't be a worry. One thing you'll want to consider is the direction of the floor beams: if you can put the aquarium across several, rather than along just one, you'll distribute the load and run less risk.

Edit: Here's a good list of various aquarium sizes and their empty and full approximate weights.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top