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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am taking the big test in about nine days and I am just trying to stay calm and remain on my A-Game. I have gotten 5 preptests completed with scores being 156, 156, 152, 156, and 156. Seems that's where I'll likely be. Really hoping to boost that score another couple point in the coming week.

If anyone is taking it (or has taken it) let's discuss some studying tips and last minute advice.
 

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All I know is MCAT stuff haha! Good luck though
Thanks, thinking about jumping to the forum at top-law-schools becuase there seems to be some good info there. Really though, one can't expect help from a random forum post that shouldn't have otherwise been acquired through rigorous studies. Still fun to try though :/
 

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Not really on point -- somewhat putting the cart before the horse -- but I offer the following comments:

1. Make sure you conduct a meaningful review of the job placement statistics for graduates of the law school(s) you are interested in applying to before you apply. If you're going to commit a substantial amount of time and financial resources towards attending law school, you should attempt to understand what type of return can be reasonably expected from a historical perspective.

2. It doesn't hurt to keep in mind what Mark Twain once said about statistics.

3. Read up on the documents that have been submitted as part of several pending lawsuits filed by graduates against New York Law School and Thomas M. Cooley Law School. I would not be surprised if the problem ("less-than-honest or meaningful" disclosure of graduate job placement metrics) is more systemic across law schools rather than isolated incidents, especially in recent years given the very poor economy.

I'm not sure what law schools you are considering, whether you want to practice a specific type of law (IP, tax, family, litigation, etc.), or if you are looking to relocate to a specific part of the country upon graduating from law school. That being said,

4. If you think you have a good idea of where you want to end up after you graduate, consider law schools with a strong alumni network in that area.

5. Look into the requirements/eligibility criteria for taking a given jurisdiction's bar exam. In the past, some jurisdictions have offered a discount for applicants signing up to take the bar exam prior to graduation. At one time, graduates of an ABA-accredited law school in Wisconsin did not have to take the state's bar exam. Finally, there are certain locations where it makes sense to have an attorney's license in multiple jurisdictions. For instance, if you plan to practice in the Washington, DC area, you might want to be licensed in MD, VA, and DC (possibly PA & DE also).

Here's an example for illustrative purposes only, although it is no longer applicable because of changes to bar exam formats:

Years ago if you were taking the Pennsylvania bar exam and scored a 135 on the multistate portion, you automatically passed (without the essay portion even being reviewed). The 135 multistate score on PA's bar exam also qualified you for admission to the DC Bar (133 on the multistate portion was an automatic passing score on DC's bar exam) WITHOUT taking that jurisdication's bar exam (PA & DC had reciprocity for admissions purposes). Thus, you probably wouldn't take the DC bar. Instead, by taking PA's bar exam and getting the appropriate multistate score you would kill 2 birds with one stone, so to speak. The bar admission eligibility/requirements have changed over the years, so be sure to check what the current requirements are. But if you research them in advance, there might still be opportunities to strategically take certain bar exams while skipping others.

6. Many law schools allow you to take MBA courses (without being a JD/MBA student) taught at the B-school to satisfy elective credit requirements needed for graduation. The issue is whether or not you have to be admitted to both the law school and the B-school in order to take an MBA course or 2. Many lawyers are alarmingly weak at understanding how businesses operates, so it might not be a bad idea to look at an elective or 2 outside of the law school if that is an option.

7. Look closely at the law school's clinical and trial advocacy progams and how many students are able to participate: # of slots open per course, how often the course is offered per academic year, and what are the prerequisites. For example, if criminal clinic has 12 slots and is only offered 1x per year to 3Ls, your odds of getting into that course aren't very good, especially if you attend a large law school.

8. Make sure the law school is ABA-accredited. Some jurisdictions require an applicant for the bar exam to have graduated from an ABA-accredited law school.

Good luck.
 

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Make sure to sleep the night before and eat breakfast!

All I'm good for is SAT and Undergrad admissions. I know very little about grad school since I don't plan on going.

I probably should learn a thing or two about the MCAT and LSAT though.

-Andrew
 

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I'm a bit on the other side of this. I take the neurology board exams today. Been cramming random factoids all week. I'm in the process of setting up a new tank and that will be my reward for getting through.
Good luck on the first.
 

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I'm a bit on the other side of this. I take the neurology board exams today. Been cramming random factoids all week. I'm in the process of setting up a new tank and that will be my reward for getting through.
Good luck on the first.
Let me get out my MCAT flash cards and I'll quiz you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the input, especially dwc13. Yea a lot of that stuff has to do with the future but all worthwhile knowledge none the less. Haha, I can assure you I am going to an accredited law school. I took a more recent LSAT today, being administered in Sept. of 2007. All my previous tests were from around 2000. I have just gotten the newest release of ten actual tests that include those from 2007-2010. I know that tests evolve over time, but not too much. Anyway, took this test today and scored a 164! That is breaking into the 90th percentile range and exactly what I am looking for. I don't know if it was a fluke or if these more recent tests work differently for me. I'll be taking a couple more from this book and see how they go. Man......I just really want that score on my test on the 1st.
 

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First, do not go to law school. Second, because I know you will not listen to me, you need to be acing the logic games section (in the time allowed). Third, you need to be taking practice exams every day at this point (all six sections).

Reality check: if you can't get out of the 150's, then you shouldn't waste your money on law school. You won't get into a top-tier school with less, and even their graduates are struggling to find work. You must know that this is the worst market for law school graduates in history. Let that sink in. If you don't know that, then you failed miserably to research this career path. That doesn't bode well for your future law school performance because lawyers must be excellent researchers. I can point you to several recent articles about law school overproduction, the number of legal jobs by state, the current trend in outsourcing attorneys to India, the versatile J.D. myth, et al. Just pm me.

Please don't take this personally. It's far better to have your feelings hurt now instead of when you get your 1L grades or when your student loans come due.
 

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@Mcqueenesq: A similar speech was given to me by a neurosurgeon when I was in medical school. He said. Get out now, it's not too late to go into business. He was not happy with his carrier. I'm happy I went on with school. I love what I do. That I think is the key. If you love what you do you will be fulfilled. If law is a love go for it, if it is for any other reason (to please others, to prove a point, to make money...), then think about another direction before your trapped into a carrier you are not happy in.

Cheers
 

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I agree. If you love your work, it is fulfilling. And practicing law is definitely rewarding. It's getting the opportunity to work that's the issue here. Unlike medical school, there is no guaranteed job awaiting law school graduates. Many states are currently producing three or more graduates for every new attorney position. Even if Higher Thinking's motivation for going to law school is purely the love of the law, which doesn't make a lot of sense because he or she hasn't learned the law yet, it will be extremely difficult to find a job practicing law. If law school weren't so expensive, then I'd say go for it. But the debt is real, and Higher Learning will be lucky to escape with less than a six-figure bill. I know my comment seemed harsh, but I gave Higher Learning the warning that my friends and I wish we had received.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/40863598

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/27/the-lawyer-surplus-state-by-state/

http://lawschooltuitionbubble.wordpress.com/original-research-updated/law-graduate-overproduction/

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704396504576204692878631986.html

http://www.slate.com/id/2288751/

http://www.abajournal.com/news/arti...ents_about_absolutely_incorrect_use_of_rankin
 

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Well, as for taking the test on October 1... I haven't done the LSAT, but I did pass all four sections of the CPA exam on my first try. The key for me was to completely "decompress" for the day before the exam. I didn't touch my study guides, didn't look at flash cards, and I spent the day doing what I wanted to do and didn't give one thought to exam prep. There's nothing more harmful than having an anxiety breakdown the day before the exam, and second guessing whether you're prepared or not. So, my advice is to remember to take some time in these remaining days before your exam to clear your head and enjoy yourself.
 
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