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According to what I know from experience, this plant is quite surprisingly beginner-friendly for the new eriocaulon hobbyist. Still requiring needs like: high light, co2, and fertilizers, however ;) It is definitely not as picky as the other harder to grow eriocaulons. They would do well in a pH of 7.2 or lower. gH and kH must be low as well. Make sure iron is available, trace, and NPK. Mine split into two parts now :) They have thicker leaves, not very needle-like. They are new, and aren't that cheap D:
 

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You can get a lot of info if you google it. I understand it is indigenous to the Northeast coast of the US and Canada. It is a somewhat rare plant and was listed at one website as status G3 -- global concern for extinction. I don't believe it was listed as endangered, but it was listed as G3- global concern for extinction. Although another website said that a survey done in the US in the late 90's identified about a third of native plants in the US as potentially at risk for extinction! kinda scary!

They are an easy to grow eriocaulon. I have been growing it in a fairly rich substrate, CO2 and high light. Multiple plants will grow from one plant and I have been splitting them about 1x per month. I'm not sure how low the KH has to be, but I have been growing them in Seattle water which is about KH 2 out the tap and I have been growing one at about KH 4, under moderate/low light, with minimal CO2, no water column fertilization -- air bubble bubbling constantly -- not that I would advise growing them this way, but the plant does seem to still be growing and multiplying even under these conditions. When flowering stalks appear, I usually twist them off.

If you are interested in growing it and have patience, I know of a place you can probably get them cheaply, but you have to wait a bit..
 

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The original collection for the hobby (by me and two friends) was from a slightly brackish tidal marsh, so that should tell you that it's pretty adaptable. In central Virginia, they grow in fully fresh tidal rivers by the thousands, though oddly enough, those don't seem to do quite as well as the brackish plants. As has been mentioned, they do far better with a lot of light, but can survive with less. I didn't know I still had any, but found a bunch that had been totally shaded over. Of course, they don't look particularly good when grown that way.
 
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