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I am looking at buying a manufactured home. I have a 75 gallon.

My brother lived in a manufactured home with a 75 gallon in it for 3-4 years. When he moved the house had huge cracks running up and down the sides, and the floor sloped in where the tank had been.

Do you think that could have been a poorly built place or is it really important to reinforce the area that the tank will be sitting in?
 

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I set up a 125g for my grandparents in their manufactured home, it's been there for about 8 years and has not bent anything. You just need to place the tank in an area that is supported, to find out which beams are running where, you should crawl into the crawlspace, or look at the blueprints, the city will have a copy accessible in the archives.
 

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Fyi

I don't live in a manufactured home but I do have a crawl space under where my tank sits. The tank shakes a bit when I walk across the floor in front of the tank. But other then that I have seen no floor sag or anything like that and it is sitting long ways running parallel withe the floor supports. I don't think you'll have issues
 

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^ That unnerves me a lot man.

I've seen firsthand what happens when the floor underneath a large tank shakes too much and decides to give way.

I wouldn't keep anything larger than a 100g on a surface that is unstable. Actually, I wouldn't keep anything on an unstable surface.

If it's on a low stand, than maybe, but if it's higher than 3 feet off the ground, and the ground moves when you walk by it, count me out. I'd rather put my tank on the ground.
 

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My house is very nice and all, but when you get right down to it - it's a mobile home. Mine has long metal frame rails (4 - double wide) with triangular braces every so many feet that reach towards the outer wall. I have my 36 gallon on that outer wall, so far so good - not shakey or anything, it doesn't move at all if you walk in the room or even right infront of the tank.
 

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This is a question which is asked quite often. Often there is no need to worry but there are things to consider. Part of the question is where the tank is placed and where the floor is supported underneath. Sometimes it takes a look underneath to know for sure. I drew up this sketch for info.

There are better and less desirable. Red does not mean it won't work. It just needs some support from underneath to be sure it won't sag. Trailers have a set of big iron beams which support the full weight of the trailer as it is pulled down the road. If the tank sets directly on those beams, consider it solid! The farther away, maybe less solid?
 

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jbrady33 and PlantedRich gave excellent info - I have my tanks set up according to the floor stud and steel beam location, and I ordered two steel triangular trusses (like jbrady33 mentions) to go under my biggest tank for piece of mind, even though my mobile home supply/repair company said I didn't need it. I have a 1988 Norris single wide home, and in it are; two 10g QT tanks, two 29g tanks together on a vertical iron stand, one 40B, two 55s, and one 125g tank. They've been up for years, with the exception of the 125 which has been up less than a year. Never had a single problem...just use your steel beams and floor studs as support wisely.
 

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If you have a trailer tongue still on the trailer the beams will be directly behind where the tongue connects. The floor joists (beams) will then be laid across the steel support. The joists will likely be spaced every 16-24 inches from front to back of the trailer.
In my drawing the red is less good than the orange be cause it rests on only one joist where the orange uses multiple joists. If there is not foundation or support post, both of these are using the strength of the floor joists only and I would want more. Often something as simple as driving a 4X4 under the floor joists at this point will do. Set the 4X4 on something steady like concrete or a block. Depends on the soil type.
 
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