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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody SCUBA? I have the oppertunity to buy some good used equipment and take some lessons (in the future...) but am not exactly sure what to expect with this whole SCUBA diving thing. I have been reading up on SCUBA diving on various websites and watched a couple of basic equipment and concept videos on Youtube, but beyond that I know nothing.

My urge to SCUBA started when I talked to the manager of a rather large salt and freshwater public aquarium in Milawukee WI. I asked him for advice concerning maybe in the future working/interning at such a facility, and he said that getting SCUBA certified would be a big plus. Along with that I love being under water, am a decent swimmer and currently am very interested in limnology/marine biology/biology in general.

The main thing that could be a problem would be the overall cost... I am a poor 14 YO after all. :thumbsdow Anyway, any thoughts from any divers out there? Is it that fun and worth it? And any idea what I should be expecting to pay for equipment and lessons?
 

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It's not cheap, but worth it if you are into these things. Losing gravity is a fabulous thing.

Living close to dive-able location helps of course. And having someone - spouse/friends/club/group - to go with helps too.

I paid $300 quite a few years ago at a college for a two week course that included 3 or so actual dives, a sitting in a swimming pool with the equipment, and a number of theoretical classes. I don't have my own equipment, nor anyone to go with, so I just go every 2 or 3 years to not forget everything. Equipment rental for a day, incl two bottles, adds about $80 around here.

My dream is one day to go diving at a tropical beach/reef, without having to wear a thick wetsuit to prevent immediate death by freezing.
 

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In the 70's when I learned to Dive One needed to be 18 YO. I don't know if they have changed that. I haven't been able to dive for years. I'm certified under PADI & NAUI. But, I would encourage you to seek out every opportunity and take every opportunity that comes by. Make the sacrifices ... you will not regret it later in life.
 

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If it's something you're interested in, I'd definitely go for the classes and cert. I got mine when I was 13 (you have to renew for an adult cert. later) but it's an amazing experience.

At least imo though, hold off on buying any equip. It's difficult/expensive to maintain properly, and not too terrible to rent when you want to go diviing. Plus- if you have to travel any distance to your dive site, all that stuff is a pita to travel with :)

Just my .02
 

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Oh yeah just rent your equipment use the money to fund your lessons and the like.

I ended up diving all over the world courtesy US Navy.
 

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i got my license at 15 and it was one of the greatest choices i ever made :D my cert was 400$ but totally worth it. i live near the st lawrence river (biggest concentration of freshwater wrecks in the world :D) so going out is a snap, but you'll see cool stuff pretty much anywhere you go and it's just a ton of fun to be underwater.

i rented gear for the first little while (pretty cheap) before buying my own stuff used (got everything used and paid about 350$ + new tank for 200$ that came with a bunch of free fills). dive shops have super deals on cheap used stuff (booties, gloves, hood and weight belt for 30$?!). you can get perfectly good gear for cheap if you shop around. you don't need a 400$ BC or a computer (i'm old school :p) to go out and dive. i'm still using a mask and snorkel i bought for 20$ at walmart a few years ago and it works perfectly. it's also incredibly easy to maintain the gear... all you really need is a vip/hydro on the tank every year or so... nothing else requires any maintenance.

here's a little vid i just put up of a wreck:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXSjOjnX2dY
 

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My lessions were about 400$ at Adriatic sea since Croatia has got big part of it. In first lession i was scared [censored][censored][censored][censored]less but soon thing settle. You dont have to buy equipment, for the start you can rent it when going on dives. When you will have more experience (and money) you can buy gear. Dont buy nothing now, you dont know what is good/bad
 

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I was a SCUBA instruction in a previous career, and I can tell you this:

SCUBA is one of those (these?) hobbies where you are constantly thinking about new gear, reading magazines with the newest stuff, and always seeing something newer and better than what you have. So many SCUBA divers spend huge amounts of money on gear, and so many of those same divers hardly use their gear at all.

And, it takes a while to really understand how much diving you'll be doing, what kind of gear you'll need, etc.

Add that to the fact that renting SCUBA gear is generally considered safe and inexpensive, and there is little justification for buying your own gear unless you are fairly sure about what kind of gear you need AND you are certain that you'll be doing a lot of diving.

Most open water courses include gear rental. So, I would strongly recommend against investing in a hobby that you don't even know you'll enjoy, when there is rental gear so widely available.
 

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I was a SCUBA instruction in a previous career, and I can tell you this:

SCUBA is one of those (these?) hobbies where you are constantly thinking about new gear, reading magazines with the newest stuff, and always seeing something newer and better than what you have. So many SCUBA divers spend huge amounts of money on gear, and so many of those same divers hardly use their gear at all.

And, it takes a while to really understand how much diving you'll be doing, what kind of gear you'll need, etc.

Add that to the fact that renting SCUBA gear is generally considered safe and inexpensive, and there is little justification for buying your own gear unless you are fairly sure about what kind of gear you need AND you are certain that you'll be doing a lot of diving.

Most open water courses include gear rental. So, I would strongly recommend against investing in a hobby that you don't even know you'll enjoy, when there is rental gear so widely available.
Couldn't have said it better.

I dove around the world and all That was mine was my fins and snorkle gear. I rented the rest and when I did I ended up rent the latest and greatest thing out at the time. I think with my gear I owned I spent $75.00 (US) and used it up around the world. This was in the late '70's.

Best wishes,
Wes
 

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all you really need is a vip/hydro on the tank every year or so... nothing else requires any maintenance.
Regulator warranties often require annual/semiannual maintenance be performed by a qualified tech.

I was a SCUBA instruction in a previous career, and I can tell you this:

SCUBA is one of those (these?) hobbies where you are constantly thinking about new gear, reading magazines with the newest stuff, and always seeing something newer and better than what you have. So many SCUBA divers spend huge amounts of money on gear, and so many of those same divers hardly use their gear at all.

And, it takes a while to really understand how much diving you'll be doing, what kind of gear you'll need, etc.

Add that to the fact that renting SCUBA gear is generally considered safe and inexpensive, and there is little justification for buying your own gear unless you are fairly sure about what kind of gear you need AND you are certain that you'll be doing a lot of diving.

Most open water courses include gear rental. So, I would strongly recommend against investing in a hobby that you don't even know you'll enjoy, when there is rental gear so widely available.
+1 except for the instructor bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
WOW! Thank you guys so much for all the help! Like suggested, I passed up purchasing any equipment.

I think I am going to try and take lessons in the near future. I've been researching and it there are some classes that cost about $350'ish in my area. Maybe next year? That should give me some plenty of time to save up and research.

There is a local dive shop near my house that I am also going to go to. Just to ask some questions and look around at stuff. I believe they are the certified group that teaches the lessons as well.

Again, thank you all for the advice!
 

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Mask, fins, & snorkel are where the shops try to regain the profit lost in cut-rate classes, so be wary. As long as your mask fits, you don't need anything fancy and old school fins are actually more maneuverable than the latest marketing gimmicks. Put the savings toward a good quality reg and keep it maintained.
 

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Even the masks fit people pretty well. At the beginning of each class we'd spend 20 minutes letting everyone try out different masks, hoping to find one for each student that would get some suction going when they pushed it up to their face. We pretty much always got everyone fit, with very rare exceptions.

SCUBA is like many other hobbies - the gearhead part of the hobby is mostly fashion. A simple setup is fine. The only new thing that people buy these days is a dive computer, which is actually a great thing that has become popular and is usually a good idea. Even those, however, only need to have basic functionality without the bells and whistles.
 

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just do it! I bought nothing but the snorkle/goggles/fins and only dive annually so rent equipment and I love it. I fly down south and do the reefs off of Florida and it's just amazing. it is not cheap but does not need to be a sinkhole either, depending where you take it. My experience has been nothing but fantastic and I can't wait til the next trip. For me weightlessness and that junk doesn't matter - it's swimming with sea life in their natural environment.
 

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I wouldn't 'meh' your reg maintenance. All of those seals ate rubber or silicone and they dry out, get old, etc.

I've seen regulators fail more than once. It's really one of the only parts that needs to be looked after at all.

from Tapatalk
 

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i only do about 10 dives a summer and the rest of the time the regs sit in the basement. i do look them over in the spring and recently had the diaphragm changed on one, but besides that, i've never had a problem or done much of anything to them.

frankly, i'd rather just do it myself than have some dimwit at the shop open it up and mess around with it, that's when the problems start.

i have a reserve and a buddy. i'm not concerned.
 

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If you invest in lessons, make a promise to yourself to dive regularly, to keep up on your skills! It can be an expensive hobby if you live far away from areas that you can dive.

I was certified in 1994, dived in 2000 and most recently this summer. It was almost like starting over each time; re-learning buoyancy and what not.

Don't be like me!
 
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