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I'm confused as to its freshwater application at all unless we were talking about a fish-only tank.

Good question.

In my situation, I have a fish tank with plants as opposed to a "planted tank". My goal is to decrease nitrates so I can add more nano fish. Right now this tank approaches 20ppm nitrates by the end of the week, just before the WC. I fertilize with 2HR aquarist ZERO every other day. ZERO has no nitrates or phosphates.

So I would agree that the use of this type of system is limited or unnecessary in a fresh water planted tank (a tank that may have a few fish, but is primarily set up as a heavily planted aquarium requiring nitrate supplimentation).
 

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Sulphur media reactors aren't the hokey Novak cat litter and plenum setup with massive baskets. They're sealed chambers and water enters them slowly so oxygen can be removed. (I've run them on some of my reefs in the past.)
I was doing some testing yesterday so I tested the effluent of my sulfur denitrator -- 0 ppm, while the system water tests at its usual 2.5 ppm. This is a standard reef tank, no algae scrubbers or anything else pulling out NO3.

What is the tested removal rate per pass through these plenum-style setups? Plenum denitrification in aquariums was discovered by SW keepers in the early 1990's (by an aquarist, Sam Gamble, working at Pennecamp Park in FL -- here's the only online mention of this I can find anymore), and it didn't work very well then, which is why keepers moved on to useful methodologies. Without testing input and output though the filter, there's reason to doubt there is anything gong on at all, at least anything more than happens with the usual tiny bit of denitrification that could take place down in a gravel bed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
I was doing some testing yesterday so I tested the effluent of my sulfur denitrator -- 0 ppm, while the system water tests at its usual 2.5 ppm. This is a standard reef tank, no algae scrubbers or anything else pulling out NO3.

What is the tested removal rate per pass through these plenum-style setups? Plenum denitrification in aquariums was discovered by SW keepers in the early 1990's (by an aquarist, Sam Gamble, working at Pennecamp Park in FL -- here's the only online mention of this I can find anymore), and it didn't work very well then, which is why keepers moved on to useful methodologies. Without testing input and output though the filter, there's reason to doubt there is anything gong on at all, at least anything more than happens with the usual tiny bit of denitrification that could take place down in a gravel bed.
The New Wave: Aquarium Husbandry-A More Natural Approach is the result of an ongoing collaboration between the two authors. For more than 6 years, Gamble and Goemans have researched and experimented with the plenum method of filtration. "Our goal has mainly been to explain its (plenum) benefits and compare it to other methods because we see the plenum method as an enhanced extension of Mother Nature" (p. 257).

The two guys wasted their 6years +, or did we missed their finner points?
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
That's dismissive. I posted my data here to defend my point, others could easily do the same.
Apologies if it is dismissive.
I must have missed connecting your data on the sulphur denitrator to the plenum.
Sulphur denitrator works when it is done correctly.
 

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Sulphur denitrator works when it is done correctly.
Correct. Plenums, not really. Unless someone takes a water sample from their effluent and it tests measurably lower than the inflow water, and these tests can be replicated not only on this system but others similarly set up.

We must have missed their "enhanced extension of mother nature"
Again, correct -- because it turns out to be a more or less unworkable methodology. The theory was there, a couple early experiences suggested it might be applicable to hobby closed systems, didn't turn out that way, gave it up. But that's been repeated numerous times in this thread. The horse is dead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 · (Edited)
Correct. Plenums, not really. Unless someone takes a water sample from their effluent and it tests measurably lower than the inflow water, and these tests can be replicated not only on this system but others similarly set up.


Again, correct -- because it turns out to be a more or less unworkable methodology. The theory was there, a couple early experiences suggested it might be applicable to hobby closed systems, didn't turn out that way, gave it up. But that's been repeated numerous times in this thread. The horse is dead.
Ok thanks for your views.

***edit addition, Sulphur denitrator as some found out did not work for them. Most likely it was not done correctly. [my assumption]
Plenum theory remains a theory [?] because it is more or less unworkable methodology.
So the horse is dead. Anything else died? [just wondering out aloud, no offence]
 
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