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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new here but have been lurking off and on. I am trying to get a planted tank going and have had a number of false starts. My tank is a mature one that has had plastic plants and I wanted to start using live plants.

First of all, the tank:



It is a 12 gal. with 1 sumo loach, 4 gertrudae rainbowfish, 1 brilliant rasbora, 1 white cloud, 1 male guppy, and 1 male betta. I also have 5 nerite snails and 3 assassin snails. The rasbora, wht cloud, and guppy are old fish left over from different schools I have had in the past.

Now my problem: I have had great luck with my anubias nana to the point where I have divided it into 2. I basically have killed everything else although a wenditii crypt seems to have sent out roots or something because I have little ones sprouting all over the tank. Any suggestions for taller plants that are hard to kill? I have tried some of the sags and vals with no luck. I have also tried stuff like anarchis and egeria.

The feathery stuff is some guppy grass I just threw in for the fun of it.
 

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Crypts melt with parameter changes, like moving into a new tank.
They will fill this whole tank given time sending little plants all over.
Thanks for joining and posting your tank :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In order to give you ideas of plants we first need to know what lighting you are using. I'm assuming you are going low tech no CO2 and Ferts; adding excel???
I am using the lighting that came with the aquarium (Marineland Eclipse). The replacement bulb info says that it is 13w 5,500K.

You are correct ... I want to go low tech. No CO2 but I am willing to consider some kind of general purpose readily available fertilizer.
 

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Aquarium kits notoriously come with lights not adequate to grow alot of plants. That's one reason why you haven't had success with anything except for low light plants.

There are various types of anubias you can get, Java moss, java fern, most crypts should do ok with standard aquarium lighting.

If you want to keep things basically as they are in terms of your setup you'll have to stick with low light plants.

If you wish to grow a bigger variety of plants you'll need to consider a bit of a light upgrade and if you want to get really crazy lights, fertilizers and/or CO2.

But low light tanks can be really nice so I'd say stick with what you got going on and work with plants that are more likely to survive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Aquarium kits notoriously come with lights not adequate to grow alot of plants. That's one reason why you haven't had success with anything except for low light plants.

There are various types of anubias you can get, Java moss, java fern, most crypts should do ok with standard aquarium lighting.

If you want to keep things basically as they are in terms of your setup you'll have to stick with low light plants.

If you wish to grow a bigger variety of plants you'll need to consider a bit of a light upgrade and if you want to get really crazy lights, fertilizers and/or CO2.

But low light tanks can be really nice so I'd say stick with what you got going on and work with plants that are more likely to survive.
Thanks. That's my plan. I don't have the time or $ to get too fancy so I will stick to plants that will work with my setup instead of changing the setup to work with the plants. I'll leave that for a later time when I am more confident.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
one cheap thing you can do to improve the look of your tank would be to add a black background, unless of course you want it viewable from both sides.

I'm not sure about a much bigger piece of driftwood, but a taller one might be night
I intentionally put it on the counter between the kitchen and dining room so I could see it from both sides. Occasionally I have thought about a background. Are there any advantages besides looks?
 

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Fish get freaked out if they don't have a place to hide, a dark background can help with that.

A big branch of wood that reaches to the top can be planted with moss and Anubias with the crypt forming a groundcover below. Lots of places for the fish to hide if they need to, your betta would love peeking through the leaves. That would be nice for a tank you want to view from all sides.

Start out with a bottle of the usual plant food that has potassium and micro nutrients. That may be all you need if algae hasn't attacked yet and your anubias is doing okay. If algae arrives then you may want to invest in Seachem's Excel for a carbon source that helps the plants and isn't good for algae.
 

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I intentionally put it on the counter between the kitchen and dining room so I could see it from both sides. Occasionally I have thought about a background. Are there any advantages besides looks?
not really other than fish comfort like kathy said, looks which can help the fish and plants stand out and hide equipment and cords behind the tank
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I ordered these plants:

Anubias Lancelata
Crytocoryne Balansae
Anubias Nana Mini
Windelov Fern
African Water Fern
Dwarf Lily

What do you think for low light/low tech?

Also, I like the idea of a bigger piece of driftwood but my LFS and big box stores only carry the fake stuff or driftwood attached to slate. I like the Mopani wood like I currently have, even though it needs to be soaked for quite a while.
 
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