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Hello everyone!

My angelfish just laid a bunch of eggs in my community freshwater aquarium. My angelfish have become very aggressive to my other fish.... I would really like for the eggs to hatch. So, what should I do?!?

~Thanks
 

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Firstly, do you know for sure that you had a male & a female involved in the spawning ?
There may not have been a male around to fertilize the laid eggs, so they may not hatch.
A couple of days will tell the tale - if the eggs are/remain white, it's a sign they are not fertilized - they should be an amber color if they are.
If you do actually have a hatching, not much you can do about it in a community tank - the parents will defend the eggs & fry (if there are any) very aggressively, but that may not help out much in the long run.
But if the spawning was successful to start with, then you will have learned something, & if you want them to do it again, you'd want to segregate the pair in their own breeding tank, so that when they spawn again - and they will, you'll have a good chance of successfully raising some young angels.
Hope that helps.
 

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What to do now is most likely going to be more prep for next time if you don't have a way to move either the other fish or at least wall them off from the eggs. You've got a little time but not much before the eggs hatch if they are fertile. But then don't be totally disappointed if they are a pair and don't quite get it right the first time. Practice helps! One or the other may eat the first group but then with practice they get the idea that they are not food.
But what you can do is some study on what to do the next time it comes round. and it will for sure if there is a pair and you keep them fed and in good condition. Feeding baby egg-layers can be a learning experience at first so read up a bit?
 

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If you can remove whatever the eggs are attached to, hatching fertile angelfish eggs yourself is very easy.

1. Go to the supermarket, buy a 1 gallon glass jar of pickles. Do whatever you like with the pickles (i hate pickles lol) and toss the lid. Wash the jar over and over and over until the pickle smell is gone, and be sure it was rinsed well.

2. Fill the jar with aged water the same temp as the aquarium. Don't use tank water, because it's full of organisms from substrate, plants, fish and your arms. Find a way to keep the temperature stable. I use undertank heating pads designed for hermit crab enclosures, and a piece of eggcrate on top of the pad. Set your jar on the eggcrate. You'll need to do what keeps the water between 74 and 78 in your location. Some folks actually put the hatching jar inside the main aquarium with the top sticking above the water. If you have room to do this, you can use red bricks to get the jar high enough.

3. Remove whatever the eggs are attached to and place it in the jar. Be quick, but careful. Put 5 or 6 drops of meth. blue in the water, and position an airstone so that a gentle current flows across the front of the eggs. If you can't source meth. blue, add 1/4 tsp. Hydrogen peroxide every 12 hours. This helps cut down on fungus, as does the next step.

4. Eggs that are white and stay white need removed or they will fungus and the fungus will spread to the good eggs. Use an eyedropper and suck them off of whatever they are attached to.

5. in two days or so, you'll start to see wiggly white strings come out of the eggs. These are the fry. Keep sucking off dead eggs at this point. At this point, change 50% of the water every day and replace with the same water you used in the beginning. When all the wigglers have dropped to the bottom, remove whatever the eggs were attached to.

6. Keep changing 50% of the water every day, and keep the temp stable. When the fry are free swimming, feed appropriate sized food (vinegar worms, golden pearls, fresh hatched brine shrimp, etc. ) When they stop looking like tiny guppies and start to look like angelfish, they are ready to move to bigger, more appropriate quarters.

I've been breeding Angels on and off for about 30 years, and this is how I do it. There are plenty of other ways that probably work just as well.
 

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For 1st round I would just watch and see what happens my angels span about every 12 days
 
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