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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every time i do a water change, my angel fish stay at the top of the water for a few hours. They act like they need more oxygen. When I add new water, does it have less oxygen? The tetras and guppies don't act that way. Only the angel fish.

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Do you dechlorinate the water beforehand or do you add a dechlorinator as water is being replaced?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No but our water doesn't have chlorine. I check it every few weeks. I think it's cause we live in the county and the water is different here.... but I've only used strips to test it. I wonder if it's a small amount that's not showing on the strips.

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Water that's newly added is often low on oxygen, since it's been sitting in pipes and water tanks and such for awhile. Most likely that's the issue and your smaller fish are okay because they don't need as much oxygen. I'd suggest adding an airstone of some sort, possibly just after water changes.
Also, angelfish top-hug with their entire forehead pressed to the water's surface sometimes if they're feeling nervous, or if they're just trying to relax somewhere safe. They're pretending to be leaves when they do that. If yours aren't breathing particularly fast, they might just be a bit frightened by all the disturbance.
 

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I fill my large tanks with a hose, putting my thumb over the hole in the pipe to spray the water in a fan so it can pic up oxygen and gas off chlorine etc.
When I use a bucke, I use the hand shower thingy in the bath to spray the water at the bucket from as high as possible while still catching most of the water, like rain.
 

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Water that's newly added is often low on oxygen, since it's been sitting in pipes and water tanks and such for awhile. Most likely that's the issue and your smaller fish are okay because they don't need as much oxygen. I'd suggest adding an airstone of some sort, possibly just after water changes.
Also, angelfish top-hug with their entire forehead pressed to the water's surface sometimes if they're feeling nervous, or if they're just trying to relax somewhere safe. They're pretending to be leaves when they do that. If yours aren't breathing particularly fast, they might just be a bit frightened by all the disturbance.
Leaves... so neat
Animal instincts amaze me sometimea.

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I fill my large tanks with a hose, putting my thumb over the hole in the pipe to spray the water in a fan so it can pic up oxygen and gas off chlorine etc.
When I use a bucke, I use the hand shower thingy in the bath to spray the water at the bucket from as high as possible while still catching most of the water, like rain.
Thank you. That's a good idea. And now that you bring it to my attention, I always used a garden hose on mist until I moved the tank.

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Maybe they're thinking the surface agitation = feeding? You would probably dissolve more oxygen into the tank during a water change.

EDIT: Nevermind seems the question has already been answered hahaha.


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If the tap water has a much different temperature, fill the tank in increments.
 

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I don't believe this is low oxygen. Your only changing a part of the water the rest would have oxygen. I think it could be that they think food is coming. Where are they when you feed them.
 

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Feeding was my answer as well, if they aren't exhibiting signs of low oxygen. Mine come to the surface to feed, so if come close to the tank to do anything, they are all at the surface, with mouths open!!

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My juvenile angles are real sensitive to water changes as well. They swim to the bottom corner and get tangled in my crypts... Then I usually have to leave the lights off untill they come out of hiding or they stress out
 

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Hmmmmm. My water comes from a small community well and it's only been chlorinated for the last 15 years. So if it's not chlorinated, are you trying to get to a reasonably close match of temperature?

My pinky's become a darn good pseudo-thermometer over the years and I can get to within 1 or 2 degrees of 82 when I pre-mix my change water with dechlor. If you're adding water that's on the cool side, it may be the temp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The temperature is the same. That's why I started used the sink. The water hose water was too cold. I've also tried adding a gallon every 10 minutes cause I wondered about the sudden change. The only thing I can think of is maybe the softness of the water.
The water from our tap is very soft and it takes it a little while to harden in the tank. I don't know if they would act that way over hardness.
Everything I've searched says low oxygen but with only a small water change and live plants, I don't think that's it.
Plus if they think it's feeding time, they wouldn't stay there long. But they sit there for a few hours. When they picture was tank, I did probably a 15% water change.... I do my water changes around a week or 2 apart. Usually when the water has evaporated past the black rim, I get a 5 gallon bucket, and poor the water into it. It's a 55 gallon tank. So 5 gallons plus what ever evaporated.

I add the water back by filling up a water bucket for plants. I started doing that so it was a slow flow and wouldn't knock stuff over or uproot plants.



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Throw a clean tyvek cloth over the water and pour your new water through that. It won't even disturb your sand.
Its a trick I learned with my nano tank.
 

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It wouldn't take that long for the water to oxygenate, that's too long for them to be waiting for food, and a minor shift in water hardness wouldn't do that. I still think they're just a bit on edge and are trying to not be too visible. Try draping a towel mostly over the tank after the next water change and see if the cover relaxes them enough to keep them from trying to not be there.
 
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