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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Had a couple quick questions to try and narrow down why I cant get my angels to breed...

I have 3 breeding pairs of angels in a 55g tank. I have never been a breeder for any fish before, but I was told to bring the water temp up to about 84 and and bring the PH down to around 6...I put a sponge over the filter intake, and currently have a powerhead running.

The fish are new to the tank if that plays any role in their inability to breed. They have been acclimated into a tank that was moved about a month ago, but I kept all the original substrate and 50% of the water from the etablished tank including rinsing the filter media in the tank water. And my water perameters are good.

Does having 3 breeding pairs in one tank pose an issue? Should I turn off the powerhead? Are angels like Discus and want super clean water by doing WC's every week?
 

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ehhh.. angel 1 mates with angels 2 and 3, but none of the above spawn with angel 4. i SEE eggs usually about once a month. plecos eat them...

i cant tell you how pairs will do spawning at the same time.. but with one active pair.. i lost 4 mature boesemani rainbows in 2 hours.

i dumped them into a fresh 72 from holding/living in their 29, and bam.. first spawn. i keep them at 78-81 degrees. i change 50% of the water every week and use a miracle gro knock off called grofine for nutes. the water is very hard otherwise.. you tappin in on the ogalalla(sp?) too?
 

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3 pairs in a 55... may result in 'clan wars'. The pairs will fight and fight and fight and fight and fight literally nonstop. Angels are extremely aggressive toward each other when breeding. You could probably quite easily get away with 2 pairs in that tank, though, since each pair will claim a side of the tank. That won't leave much room for other fish, so make sure those other fish are robust and can give as good as they get. Midsized cichlids like flag and redbreast acaras, firemouths, kribs, and African butterfly cichlids make great choices. Serpae and black skirt tetras, tiger barbs, and giant danios, due to their tough nature, usually work well in large groups (15ish). All three can be nippy, but they'll be hard-pressed to nip when they're at risk of being mauled by angry cichlid parents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm pretty sure I don't touch the Ogalalla aquifer... Only eastern Colorado breaches it and I live in the north Denver area. My tap is around 120ppm so I don't usually do anything to is as far as GH is concerned. This setup isn't planted either so I don't dose nutes or ferts to this setup. I'm currently in the process of a dsm carpet on another 55g that I suppose I could relocate one of the pairs to once it's up and running. I also currently have a school of about 10 zebra danios in that tank that just kinda do their own thing... No thoughts on the powerhead?
 

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Powerhead = dead fry:icon_roll if your concerned about that, unless covering the intake with foam somehow.

1 pair of Angels = plenty of fun when their by themselves breeding so why do you have three pairs?:confused1: Unless different colors. Separate to watch them breed easier. Fish that fight all the time are in distress and distressed fish don't do well in breeding or just plain healthiness all around. Get them apart and calm them down for best results. 55 gallon can be modified with egg-crate(covered with mesh) to keep them apart and allow water movement between areas(also add plants into areas to block "Line of Sight" for adults to not see each other so easily). Divide 3-ways equal sized area will work and put breeding surfaces in outside areas along outside edges of tank and middle section in very middle for best distance between pairs while they breed.

120ppm GH? = fine for fish that have not been bred in wild for 100's if not 1000's of generations. Should not be a problem as it is soft enough for the eggs/embryos to help reduce chances of fungus.

I used to breed them for years professionally and never put more than one pair into any aquarium for breeding! Period.:)

Good luck
Imi
 

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Had a couple quick questions to try and narrow down why I cant get my angels to breed...

I have 3 breeding pairs of angels in a 55g tank. I have never been a breeder for any fish before, but I was told to bring the water temp up to about 84 and and bring the PH down to around 6...I put a sponge over the filter intake, and currently have a powerhead running.

The fish are new to the tank if that plays any role in their inability to breed. They have been acclimated into a tank that was moved about a month ago, but I kept all the original substrate and 50% of the water from the etablished tank including rinsing the filter media in the tank water. And my water perameters are good.

Does having 3 breeding pairs in one tank pose an issue? Should I turn off the powerhead? Are angels like Discus and want super clean water by doing WC's every week?
I'll just throw out a few things that I can remember when I had a breeding pair quite a while ago. I bought a book called "Baby Discus" which had a lot of information that I could use for angels. Amazon has a number of books on "breeding angelfish" but it's hard to know whether they're good or not.

I think angels need a tank for each pair. You will see the angels pair off. Breed those to each other. Your ideas are good, btw.

Water flow should be very slow, especially around the breeding site - I would move the powerhead down from the site a little and point it away from the tank, or just take it out and leave the filter in. I used a piece of gray slate about 4" x 10" that is flat and not a lot of bumps, leaning almost vertically against the side of the tank. It was a good site. If you can't find a piece of roofing slate, you could probably use dark plastic.

You should really post ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and GH and KH while you're at it. I change my 10g 25% once a week.

Oh, the angels wouldn't breed in new surroundings - you'll have to wait some period of time, probably wouldn't be longer than 2 months.

After eggs are deposited, you can move the whole site to a tank of their own. get an eyedropper to take out eggs that have been infected with, I think, fungus - they are milky-colored.

Use a thinnish hose to do the fry's water changes, and put a filter sponge over the end you're using to drain.

Wait about four days after they're swimming before feeding. You can get egglayer fry food until they're big enough to eat baby brine shrimp.

You're going to have to do a lot of water changing for the fry. Test ammonia and nitrates. Nitrates should be lower than 30 ppm.

Ok, hope you have good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Very helpful... Thank you for your time and information =) I will be buying a 20g tank and putting a pair in that tank and separating the other two amongst the two 55g tanks. Then, all of the above and a little patience =)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well that didn't take long lol... Had I just been a little more patient =P Still got some good advice though and the opportunity to share. I saved these angels from a guy that had them in a cichlid tank and they were getting beat to hell, so I'm excited to see them breeding. She just laid eggs all over the stealth heater I have unplugged and I got pics of him fertilizing the eggs...

Quick question though... When the fry hatch, will the other two pairs be an issue? Because I am doing a DSM on my other 55g and don't currently have another tank to put them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Also I have one of those little clear plastic breeding boxes, should I just leave the eggs on the heater (which is unplugged btw) until they hatch and then put the fry in the box? And on a side note will my school of zebra danios be a threat to the eggs? Or are mom and dad gonna do a sufficient job of protecting them? They're a bit faster and more agile than the angels.

I work in a hospital and have a 60cc syringe I could safely suck the eggs into if I need to re locate them...
 

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I left fry with both parents. The female will take care of the eggs and fan them, and when they swim they swim around her in a cloud of fry.
 

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There's potential for the parents(one or both) to eat the eggs or fry too. So leaving them is sometimes chancy. Most parents will go for several broods eating them(if they are going to at all) then just learn not to.:wink:

Boils down to your interest in watching the whole affair from beginning to end or is it more important to keep the young. There's more fun in watching for me so I like to leave them with the parents, and once the fry get to a certain size there's really cool habits and behavior patterns from the whole group being together.

Extra tanks for all those 50-100 fry might get space consuming so you'll have to figure that into the equation as well. Either way Fry are just plain fun to watch.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well I woke up this morning and theres about 6 eggs left out of the hundred or more that were there, so that settles that =P
 

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Something I used to do was keep an little light over the nest say 10-15 watts on all night for the first several days to help the parents stay up all night which they did quite nicely.

Again seperation works for mostly keeping them alive but that takes other strategy's also.

Let me know if you want more info in that regard.

Sorry for your loss. Like Monty Python says Every Sperm is sacred...:icon_eek: and so are viable eggs.:redface:
 
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