The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Often we hear of folks carry on about Redwood forest logging.
What they often show are some owl or furry critter, perhaps salmon or bear, all critters worthy of protection.

What else is being lost by not protecting it?
Having done some restoration of streams, caves and ponds, I know that these pristine systems take many centuries to ever recover and many never do fully, not like this. We need a natural pristine standard to reference a restoration against or an impacted site, there are fewer and fewer such places that human kind has not greatly altered.

Support protection of the very scenes and places that you love and emulate within your tank.

I am particularly fond of this picture:


I love the rich growth of Horsetail ferns and liverworts:


Of course there has to be a 60 ft water fall fed by fog condensation of the old growth redwood leaves.



Note this interesting plant and the liverwort ground cover:


The amount of light at the bottom of a an old Growth redwood forest is really low, it's dark during the middle of the day.

Near the crest of the ridges on the southern side, we have Dudlya in bloom:



Regards,
Tom Barr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Thanks for sharing. We don't get to see that sort of thing here in central illinois.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
wow, thanks!
Then go to Big Basin redwood state park, about 1 hour south of you :hihi:
It's about a 4 hour hike.

The other job I had was killing Purple loosestrife on the Eel River(shovels only and kayaks), going through the avenue of the Gaints in Humbolt state Redwood Park.

In a tropical rainforest, where vegetation is so thick as to be impenetrable, it seems like the ultimate in dense forest conditions. Surprisingly, however, the greatest accumulation of biomass (living and dead organic material) ever recorded on earth is in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, where an acre of stem mass (redwood tree trunks) alone has been estimated at 1,541 tons. When branch, leaf and root mass are added, the estimate increases to 1,800 tons per acre – seven times the density of biomass in an acre of tropical rainforest.

Like the Amazon rainforests, much, if not most of life in an ancient coniferous forest remains unknown to humans. Many kinds of insects, birds, and small mammals spend their entire lives high above the ground in the forest canopy where people spend little or no time.

I'm a plant person however and love to explore creeks, lakes and seagrass but can appreciate the other critters as well.

Marin County has a lot of Redwoods very close by, Muir woods is visited by millions every year and Redwood creek there is a nice walk that's not 4 hours of hiking and is about 30-45 min from SF.

Here's a couple and pic of the Yuba river.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Hello Tom, thank you for the inspiration.
Do you have any other photo galleries with more photos/scenery like these?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
another thought

I love the pictures.

I had forgotten how beautiful spots like this could be. I have seen creeks in Big Sur and Stanislaus national forest like this.There is nothing like being at the bottom of a canyon or standing on a ridge overlooking the ocean to make you apperciate an old growth forest.

I have also spent my time grubbing out Gorse bushes in Australia and replanting native species, so I have a great apprecation :angryfire for invasive non-native plant species.

Thanks for the pictures
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,329 Posts
I love that last blue green water picture. Makes me want to melt in my chair......then get in the car to go and see some water!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hello Tom, thank you for the inspiration.
Do you have any other photo galleries with more photos/scenery like these?
Yes, various places I travel each weekend etc.
Coastal rocks, tide pools etc, tanks obviously etc.
Aquatic plant regions, waterfalls, mountains etc

This one is sweet in the Sierra:


This one is near Fairfax in Marin, a nice little lily pond:


"Gorse" is one of the worst dang weeds, nothing can get through that stuff,the worst field of cactus or Devils club cannot compare. They are trying hard to get rid of it on San Mateo mt there in SF. I see it up the coast in Sonoma, Mendocino etc.

Ick.

Point Reyes has some awesome scenery right now:

Loads of wildflowers.


I took the SFBAAPS group out there for a field trip and then up a nice moss filled series of water falls last year.


Bad year for Vernal pools this is at Jepson prairie:


Waves and the coast:


Marine plants:


Sequoia that was burnt, then later petrified:



Waterfall in Sierra foothills near Auburn:


That little lily pond in Marin again:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Feather falls is nothing short of a 10 on the water fall list.



Yet the sublime beauty of a small stream still has a nice feel:



Tidepools and seagrass at Ft Bragg area:





and the carnivorus pitcher plant, Darlingtonia near Dead Falls lake growing in peat next to a lake where we camped.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Feather falls is about 640ft, it's near Oroville, about 1.5 hours north of Sacramento. It's a 7-9 mile hike and it's mostly hill, but the view is quite nice.
There is a nice stream you hike along about 1/2 way or so, old Indian grinding stone sites etc.

In central CA, you have a 2-3 hour drive time to many spectacular features.
Towering peaks, sublime streams and forest, stark rocky desert and a large variety of aquatic habitats.

Very few places in the world have such a wide variety.
Fairly falls is a rather unlikely spot, an old military base land grant, hard to find and long boring hike in.



Abbott's lagoon in Pt Reyes is a great spot, very peculiar.
Dairy farm adds ferts to the lagoon's Freshwater side that supports rich plant growth, yet sand dunes are present, no trees, wide open spaces and lots of wildflowers. The pennywort get huge here, 10cm across, earning the name "Dollarwort". Crassula aquatic and Fontinalis are also present at various times of the years on the western shore.



Here's some scenes from Salmon creek falls Trail near Sacramento where I Mt bike every so often:

Callitricthes and Crow's foot grow here seasonally, these are from last year when we had more water, they are still there now, but harder to find.
Mather Field's vernal pools has Callitriches in the stream sinks around the pools BTW and also off Green Valley road.



Folsom lake along Salmon creek Falls Trail, lupines in spring.



Me at the SeaHag in a state park near Eureka.


This is the same Callitriches in Yosemite National park on the Hetch Hetchy side:


And next to that is a neat Red aquatic moss:





Turns green in the tank:(

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Deadfall lakes is near Weed CA.

This is sago pondweed in a more or less natural lake system and it's not weedy here:







8000ft and we have aquatic plants, deserts, we have aquatic plants, cool coastal rainforest, we have aquatic plants, Marine tide pools, we have aquatic plants, central valley, we have aquatic plants.

Pretty much everywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,880 Posts
Sweeet pics man.
That's a sweet looking moss too! did you have it IDed?
The beauty of nature can't be matched by man.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Tom, thank you for reminding me that I sit in front of the computer too much and don't get outdoors enough... :0(

You mentioned vernal pools... do you have photos of them when they are not dried up?
My Dad had a property he had a hard time selling, because it was tested and they found that is was a potential vernal pool/ CTS natural habitat. This was in Dixon. I think it is very common in that area...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,609 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes, South of Dixon is the Jepson reserve.

He might be able to work a deal with the state or an environmental group and donate the land, put his name and mug on the site.

The state may give him a credit and the pay him a decent amount for it.
Why add yet another house there when you can preserve it?
You can still make some $$, no need to be greedy.

Germany's environmental industry is far more advanced than ours due to good support and leadership.

The USA?
We(those in power) use the excuse that we cannot do any such regulations etc because China is not or other countries are not.

Since when does the USA take environmental leadership lessons from China or other countries?

Jeese!

That's not leadership and that is bad for the future.
It's bad economically also.
Such places like these should be preserved and better managed.
The economic resources are valuable, if we destroy them for a short term gain, then we lose money.

This is where Restoration Ecology is coming into it's own domain as a business model.

It's socio economic.

Ecosystem services are 33 Trillion $$$ for the USA's economy.
The global GNP is about 18 trillion$

There are many "perverse subsidies"
Timber gets 250-350 million$ a year/40 billion world wide
Grazing: 150-200million
Mining, 2-6 billion a year
Farm subsidies: 29 Billion $ a year
Nuke power/fossil fuels: 100billion a year

None of these industries could make it on their own in a true "free market".

If you add this back into our GNP, we are slightly slowing our growth vs a genuine progress indicator.

You pay for health cost for folks that are sick due to opoor air quality like big Tobacco and smokers health care issues, same thing.

We pay a lot of tax payer $ to big oil, agribusiness to keep them afloat.

Then they whine and cry they are not able to make profits when we place3 environmental restrictions on them, well, we are already payong, but they do not want you see that part.
This is not some non scientific BS here, see Meyes et al

We should move towards full cost pricing for destroying and removing our economic resources. Laws are ignored for political support/$. Some are thwarted.

See Zentner et al, 2003, Steffan Dewenter et al, 2007.

you really see how much the market and economic forces are really getting away with freebies at the tax payer's expense and hiding the real cost.

They could not be in business without the tax payers flipping the bill for these industries.

So when someone says they cannot afford to preserve and do environmental protection, they are lying in the USA.

We are already paying far for the War in Iraq than the amount of $ that might have been spent on the Kyoto protocol(300 Bilion was the cost for that).

Whether or not you agree with that is another issue, but it makes the point that these issues are cost related and we are not seeing the real cost nor the real story behind the benefits of environmental restoration and protection.

We can still manage these systems, some will be protected and some will be used wisely for other services, but right now a lot of the tax payer money is not going to help us, it's going to help those with the power and money, to get more $ and keep that pork coming in.

It's not a political party issue, they all do it and we all pay for it.:angryfire

I'm after the big fish and out to stop this and save and restore what we have and nothing is going to stop me.

My love for the sublime redwood stream is far greater.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top