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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has this happened to anyone else? I have noticed what I thought was pretty active molting going on, but I just caught one of my Amano shrimp killing and devouring a Neo. I cannot find anything online saying that this is a thing. They are listed as two very compatible species. It is not like they aren't getting enough food. There is quite a bit of algae in the tank, I give them BacterAE every other day, and Shrimp Baby every other day. They also get Hikari pellets practically every day. If anything I feel like I have been spoiling them.

Is this just due to the major size difference, or is there a way to prevent this from happening?

Water Plant Organism Botany Terrestrial plant
 

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Amanos eating your other shrimp isn't a food issue in my experience. It unfortunately happens. Not regularly, though. Usually only occurs with smaller shrimp immediately after a molt or when they're injured. Is it possible the shrimp was dead before the Amano got it? That's what I'd put my money on.

I give them BacterAE every other day, and Shrimp Baby every other day. They also get Hikari pellets practically every day.
I'd encourage you not to use BacterAE. Search the forum for details. The TL;DR: is that it is problematic for many new shrimp keepers and is wholly unnecessary. It's essentially the same kind of probiotic powder you'd give canines or felines.

Feeding anything on a daily basis is way too much. Feed your shrimp tank only what they can finish within an hour or so and remove any leftovers. Do that every 2-3 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is it possible the shrimp was dead before the Amano got it?
Surprisingly it was not dead or even injured. It was one of the bigger Neos in the tank, and the Amano in question is the largest shrimp in the tank. I just happened to be walking up to the tank and caught the whole scene. The Amano was perched up on a leaf and it either got caught in (or purposely used?) the outtake current to jet down and snatch the Neo off the sand from above and carry it off to the underside of another leaf. Where it proceeded to rip the Neo's head off to get at the meaty bits. It was gruesome and oddly predatory. My concern though is if this was just happenstance and I was there to witness this rare occurrence. Or if it happens more often than I realize. Unfortunately, I am not sure that I would really notice one or two Neos going missing. But I do have my first two berried females right now, and I am worried that this aggressive Amano might just snack up all of the babies.

I'd encourage you not to use BacterAE. Search the forum for details.
My original searching around on these forums actually led me to the product in the first place. I saw quite a bit of information about overusing it. So I use 1/6 of the recommended. Are you saying that even lower amounts can lead to issues? Can you link me to more information on the subject?

Feeding anything on a daily basis is way too much.
Between the Amanos the Neos and the snails the hikari usually dissapears in less than 15-20 minutes. I have never seen a rise in amonia. Are there additional reasons not to feed them protiens every day? Is it also bad to suppliment with a third of the recommended ShrimpBaby every other day? Keeping in mind that the tank is only a 30c.
 

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Surprisingly it was not dead or even injured.
Shrimp can easily be injured - or exposed immediately after a molt - without it being noticeable to us.

But I do have my first two berried females right now, and I am worried that this aggressive Amano might just snack up all of the babies.
They generally don't do that. But it's a good idea to make sure have plenty of moss and hiding spots for tiny shrimp.

Can you link me to more information on the subject?
Sorry, you'll need to search those things out. Don't have anything handy. But there are several discussions here and elsewhere that discuss problems associated with it. Edit: Once I'm back at my Mac, I'll look through the old threads. But in the interim, try to use the search function.

Are there additional reasons not to feed them protiens every day?
Yes. One of which involves growing too quickly to keep up with shell development, leading to problems molting.

But feeding anything daily is unnecessary in your shrimp tank. I guarantee it. Less is more.

Is it also bad to suppliment with a third of the recommended ShrimpBaby every other day?
Yes. You should never be feeding a baby-specific food unless you know you absolutely need it. And then, only what could fit on the tip of a toothpick for a roughly 20-gallon tank. Otherwise, it's just ends up as detritus. Ammonia being present isn't the only concern about overfeeding but it is one potential issue. If your tank is more than a couple months old, it's got more than enough food for shrimplets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Soooo... Now two of my very huge pregnant Amanos ganged up on one of my otocinclus over a piece of zucchini. Injured the oto, and after it started to limp around later in the day they tried to eat it. I moved them temporarily to my nursery tank, but that seems crazy!

Also. Should I just try to save the larvae when they hatch now? Or is that whole process way too complicated?
 

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I have done some searching around on the net and it seems like there are mixed opinions on Amano as far as how safe they are with dwarf shrimp. Some people say no problem others claim they will hunt shrimplets or even adults depending on the individual and how often you feed them. I am in need of some amanos to help me with hair algae but I am undecided since I don't want to risk my shrimp.

Interestingly enough someone locally breeds amano and sells them to my LFS. They have a bunch of really small ones that they sell for 8 bucks a pop. I always like to buy captive bred when I can.
 

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I have done some searching around on the net and it seems like there are mixed opinions on Amano as far as how safe they are with dwarf shrimp. Some people say no problem others claim they will hunt shrimplets or even adults depending on the individual and how often you feed them. I am in need of some amanos to help me with hair algae but I am undecided since I don't want to risk my shrimp.
People aren't so much making claims or sharing opinion as they're sharing their experience. In many cases on this forum and others, sharing evidence of it occurring. As with any critter, experiences will vary by individual - both individual hobbyist and individual specimen. Depends upon diet, tank size, scape, all of the usuals.

Plenty of us have kept Amanos with other shrimp for multiple decades. Sometimes it happens, usually it doesn't. But in a healthy tank? Losing a random fish fry or shrimplet won't make a dent in any population. I haven't experienced an issue (that I know about) in several years. Last one was a massive Amano that caught a newly-released Endler bebe. Prior to that, I saw an Amano chow down on a juvenile Caridina immediately after molting.

Currently have about 110-120 Amanos spread throughout my tanks and rarely have issues. I've seen a small school of Otos mow down a batch of shrimplets (yep) more frequently than I've had issues with Amanos, if that tells you anything.

But about the hair algae issue... don't plan on resolving your problem with Amano or other shrimp. They may consume it or they may not. And even if they do, it may not make much of an impact. I'd say most of the time they aren't going to make a noticeable difference if you have an otherwise well-established tank. It's better to focus on the root cause of the algae. Way easier and almost always cheaper. Then consider some Amanos if you have a large enough tank. They're fun to watch and way more active than most other shrimp in the hobby.

Wouldn't put my money on the Amanos your LFS sells as being locally bred, however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have done some searching around on the net and it seems like there are mixed opinions on Amano as far as how safe they are with dwarf shrimp. Some people say no problem others claim they will hunt shrimplets or even adults depending on the individual and how often you feed them. I am in need of some amanos to help me with hair algae but I am undecided since I don't want to risk my shrimp.

Interestingly enough someone locally breeds amano and sells them to my LFS. They have a bunch of really small ones that they sell for 8 bucks a pop. I always like to buy captive bred when I can.

I can only speak to my limited experience, but 5 of the 7 Amanos that I have are perfectly cordial with my dwarf shrimp. Even the baby shrimplets. The other two are pregnant females. My LFS doesn't know if they were captive or imported, but they were quite small when I got them. Purely anecdotal but it stands to reason that a momma bear shrimp would be a bit more aggressive about getting her protein.

You won't be able to save the larvae in regular freshwater tank conditions. It's quite the process.
I read up on it a little bit. I moved the two mothers into a seperate tank and ordered some instant ocean sea salt. From what I have gathered once the mothers release the larvae I have 24-48 hours to get them out of the freshwater and into a saltwater nano tank with no filter. Supposedly they are very attracted to light, so you can round them up with a flashlight and a syringe. I dont have a whole lot of confidence in actually suceeding, but figured I might as well give it a shot since I had to seperate the aggressive mothers anyways.

Currently have about 110-120 Amanos spread throughout my tanks and rarely have issues. I've seen a small school of Otos mow down a batch of shrimplets (yep) more frequently than I've had issues with Amanos, if that tells you anything.
I have been losing a few neo shrimplets. I was blaming the pregnant amanos, but perhaps it was the Otos?
 

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Purely anecdotal but it stands to reason that a momma bear shrimp would be a bit more aggressive about getting her protein.
Shrimp don't get impregnated, they merely carry eggs outside of their body. We tend to refer to them as being 'berried' in the hobby - because all the eggs look like berries. So there's no major dietary change for them other than being less active when they're carrying eggs.

I have been losing a few neo shrimplets. I was blaming the pregnant amanos, but perhaps it was the Otos?
Likely neither. Shrimplet survival requires a healthy, not overfed, well-established tank with great, consistent water quality. If you're losing young shrimp, I'd focus on the tank itself. Though, it's obviously possible other critters like Amanos are to blame.

I dont have a whole lot of confidence in actually suceeding, but figured I might as well give it a shot since I had to seperate the aggressive mothers anyways.
Raising Amano Shrimp from larval stage is a bit more convoluted than just buying some salt and using lighting to orient them, unfortunately. I use the term convoluted instead of complicated here because the entire process is enough to cause your eyes to roll back in your head. There's a long-running thread here in the Shrimp section you should check out that focuses on breeding when you have some free time. It's definitely possible to rear the young but requires quite a bit of effort.

I've only raised one batch with about 10-15% survival and it took a ton of effort. I think it helps that I'm used to raising Halocaridina rubra and some marine shrimp but it was still something I'm not sure I want to do again. At least not until I have tons of free time to focus on it. There has got to be an easier method that we just haven't yet figured out as hobbyists and I think threads like the one I mentioned above are helping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So there's no major dietary change for them other than being less active when they're carrying eggs.
That is interesting. Not too sure why mine became more active once they became berried. Not sure if it makes a difference, but they were also the largest 2 individuals in the tank.

If you're losing young shrimp, I'd focus on the tank itself.
The tank seems pretty healthy, aside from some cladophora that refuses to get out of my java moss. I have been trying to tweak and dial in my N:p:K ratio to control it, but no luck yet. The remaining 20-30 shrimplets appear colorful and seem to be getting bigger pretty quickly. But I have nothing with which to compare their growth rates.

There's a long-running thread here in the Shrimp section you should check out that focuses on breeding when you have some free time. It's definitely possible to rear the young but requires quite a bit of effort.
Thank you. I briefly skimmed that a few weeks ago when I first saw them berried. I originally was not going to even try to raise them. But since I had to remove them from the tank anyways, I figured I would give it a shot. I will give it a more in depth read.

I've only raised one batch with about 10-15% survival and it took a ton of effort.
I am open to this being a complete failure, but I'd be pretty excited to even see a 1-5% success. I have two free nano tanks that have nothing but cycled rocks and random plant cuttings in them. So converting one for saltwater phytoplankton seems like it could be fun.
 
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