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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is kind of a long post, so bear with me. Hopefully someone who has succesfully bred Amano Shrimp can help me out.

I recently moved my 4 Amano Shrimp (2 male, 2 female) from my previously planted 55G into a smaller 2.5G tank. I moved them in tonight and after an hour or two, I went to take some pics and noticed what I thought were small bubbles, but upon closer inspection were actually Amano Shrimp babies, darting around and moving towards the light. At first, I wasn't going to do anything about it, but decided I might give a shot at trying to raise them. So I siphoned a lot of them out into two separate tanks/containers.

I read through this page for some info but would appreciate any extra tips/advice. I'm not sure how I should go about the salinity issue. I had some aquarium salt so I added some in without measuring. The first container, I think I added too much salt because after a few minutes, they were all dead at the bottom. In the second tank, they seem to be doing well for now. What instrument would you guys recommend so that I can accurately measure the salinity?

As for food, I took an algae wafer and scraped it with a knife, producing a fine dust - is this small enough and an okay food source for them?

I think that's all the questions for now, thanks for reading and for any insight.
 

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IMHO, it's not worth the trouble to raise them...but if you insist, you can use either a hydrometer ($8-$12 at your LFS) for a reading of the salinity of your water. For a more accurate reading, you can get a refractometer (~$35-$40).

What kind of salt are you adding? Just regular table salt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
IMHO, it's not worth the trouble to raise them...
Whether it's worth the trouble or not, I'm up for a little challenge :)

you can use either a hydrometer ($8-$12 at your LFS) for a reading of the salinity of your water. For a more accurate reading, you can get a refractometer (~$35-$40).
Thanks for the info on measuring salinity - I'll check my LFS tomorrow.

What kind of salt are you adding? Just regular table salt?
I'm using aquarium salt which I had previously bought a while ago. Thanks again for the reply.
 

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believe it or not, but last Friday i noticed that female Amano s. has dropped her eggs. I didn't saw little shrimps. I though that they were all dead.
So , today i noticed little shrimps about 9 or 10. I think that they will survive.
I didn't put any salt or something like that in my nano shrimp aquarium. I guess that Nature made it all :D.
 

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workshopper, there is no way baby amano shrimps will live in fresh water,

its like raising land hermit crab babies, the adults are land, but the babies would have to be in salt water and needs circulation of air\\
with out it they would all die,

you probably had some snowball shrimps or something
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you using the freshwater aquarium salt (the doc wellfish kind) or marine salt? I would think you would need to use marine salt.
Ah, I didn't know there was a difference. I assume it's freshwater aquarium salt (when I used to have an Arowana and it was sick, I use to up the temp. and drop some in). It did raise the salinity though according to the hydrometer I purchased. Unfortunately, I couldn't get them to survive past day 1. I'll have to try again next time since I always see the female shrimps carrying eggs.
 

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I had baby amanos in my freshwater planted tank with NO salt for weeks! (then my tank broke and I had to replace it so they all got left behind (not a bad break- but needed to be replaced before it REALLY broke)
 

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It's not as hard as everyone makes it out to be. Read this thread for some really great info on it. http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/s...breeding.html?highlight=amano+shrimp+breeding

The second article he mentions that talks about using phytoplankton to make green water in the salt water rearing tank is the way to go. I've done this myself once and I was able to raise 8 zoes to full adulthood. I think I could have gotten a lot more if I attempted it again.
 
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