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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not quite sure. It's hard to tell with my Betta. I do have a list of the way I'm taking care of him though:

• He's in a 5 gallon tank with a cave to hide, and plants to rest

• His water is conditioned and cycled

• 10% water changes every week

• I feed him Omega One Betta Buffet Pellets, as well as Bloodworms; 2 Bloodworms every
week, 2 Pellets every day

• I test his water frequently (When he's acting strange and every water change)

• His tank lights are on during the day, and off during the night


I still wonder if I can do better from this, or if I'm currently taking care of him correctly.
 

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Sounds about right for a betta. If you want to get fancy shmancy you can get some long rooted floating plants and some blackwater extract, maybe some live foods but there's definitely no need for it. Oh- I didn't see you mention a heater, but betta like their water on the warmer side (above 72°) so a heater is a good investment. A small filter may help keep the water stable (if you don't already have one). Betta are great fish in that they are definitely low maintenance fish. It sounds like you're doing everything right, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds about right for a betta. If you want to get fancy shmancy you can get some long rooted floating plants and some blackwater extract, maybe some live foods but there's definitely no need for it. Oh- I didn't see you mention a heater, but betta like their water on the warmer side (above 72°) so a heater is a good investment. A small filter may help keep the water stable (if you don't already have one). Betta are great fish in that they are definitely low maintenance fish. It sounds like you're doing everything right, though.
I never got a heater, BUT, his tank is very close to my homes heater, so his tank warms up pretty well. Usually around 74 degrees. His tank has a filter as well.
 

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10% is too small of a water change IMO. 10% was the standard decades ago. Now we do bigger water changes. There is something called a TDS pen that measures how dirty your water is. You can get one for under $40. I bought one three months ago and found out that I had really dirty water. Now my water is 40% cleaner which is good for the fish and the plants. A TDS pen will also make it safe for you to do a bigger 50% water change. First you test the water in your tank and then you compare that with the replacement water and if they match it's safe to do a big 50% water change. Then you can really clean up the gravel with a syphon vacum which will make your water cleaner. You will see the difference by measuring the TDS. Preheat your replacement water to match the temperature of the tank. Don't clean your filter too much. Keep that dirty so it will work to clean your water. Doing all this will make a huge improvement in the quality of care you give your Betta.

EDIT: P.S. Don't forget to dechlorinate. You MUST dechlorinate when you do a big water change.
 

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Though I don't disagree with most of @Savetheplants said I must say 10% a week on a tank with only 1 betta that only gets 2 pellets/ day and 2 bloodworms/ week is really, IMO, perfectly fine. I 100% agree on the dechlorination and keeping the temperature stable, but in all honesty I've NEVER used a TDS pen on my betta tanks and have been super successful at keeping/ breeding betta. That being said- if you have well water or your water source is really hard a TDS pen may be a little more important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Though I don't disagree with most of @Savetheplants said I must say 10% a week on a tank with only 1 betta that only gets 2 pellets/ day and 2 bloodworms/ week is really, IMO, perfectly fine. I 100% agree on the dechlorination and keeping the temperature stable, but in all honesty I've NEVER used a TDS pen on my betta tanks and have been super successful at keeping/ breeding betta. That being said- if you have well water or your water source is really hard a TDS pen may be a little more important.
Yes. His water is dechlorinated with a water conditioner. Once again, his tank is near my homes heater, so his tank gets warm. I also heard TDS pens could be harmful to fish.
 

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When I have used TDS pens it's been in the containers containing waste water and new water and not in my tank itself. That would be my suggestion if you do go the pen route. I think many betta keepers will fully admit to not using TDS pens in their maintenance routine. They are great for honing in on hardness issues and are definitely very helpful (bordering a necessity) with shrimp and other delicate inverts, though.
 

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I don't really like my TDS pen because it tells me how dirty my water is. It's also fussy requiring calibration. My water is still dirty at 340 ppm. I'm annoyed at all the work I will have to do removing cherished old crumbling driftwood that used to be inhabited by my Zebra Loach. I can see the driftwood particles coming out in the syphon. The TDS pen confirms the problem.

I recommend the TDS pen because I am suggesting big water changes and I don't know the water source. I didn't want to kill someone's Betta by suggesting big water changes which could cause osmotic shock to the fish. It is only out of an abundance of caution that I advise checking the TDS changing the water. But it's also good to know how clean your tank is.

Twenty-five years ago one of my Bettas died and when I took down the tank the substrate was just horrible. It smelled bad. Back then I was doing 10% to 15% water changes thanks to Dr Axlerod and his book. They believed in the benefits of retaining old water in the 50's. It is because I feel guilty about losing that Betta that I suggest doing bigger water changes thoroughly cleaning the substrate where you can. I have a guilty conscience.
 

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I don't really like my TDS pen because it tells me how dirty my water is. It's also fussy requiring calibration. My water is still dirty at 340 ppm. I'm annoyed at all the work I will have to do removing cherished old crumbling driftwood that used to be inhabited by my Zebra Loach. I can see the driftwood particles coming out in the syphon. The TDS pen confirms the problem.

I recommend the TDS pen because I am suggesting big water changes and I don't know the water source. I didn't want to kill someone's Betta by suggesting big water changes which could cause osmotic shock to the fish. It is only out if an abundance of caution that I advise checking the TDS changing the water. But it's also good to know how clean your tank is.

Twenty-five years ago one of my Bettas died and when I took down the tank the substrate was just horrible. It smelled bad. Back then I was doing 10% to 15% water changes thanks to Dr Axlerod and his book. They believed in the benefits of retaining old water in the 50's. It is because I feel guilty about losing that Betta that I suggest doing bigger water changes thoroughly cleaning the substrate where you can. I have a guilty conscience.
I completely get it. So sorry for your loss.
 
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