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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Maybe I'm just impatient.. but im definitly a newb.

I planted my tank just over a month ago and Im learning as I go. I have alternanthera-reineckii pink and all the leaves died. I did some research and I learned that as long as there was new growth, then I needed to cut the dead leaves off. Which I did. I am curious what is the proper way to care for this beauty. Right now it is sad as it just a long stem and a few leaves at the top. Am I suppost to cut the stem as well? Some reading says that I can as long as it has 4 or 5 leaves on it. The articles went on to confuse me so I am looking for some clarification. What can I do to maximize the beauty and the growth out of this plant? Out of all my plants, I was most excited about this one.
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Water Plant Leaf Window Organism
 

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16g rimless cherry shrimp, 20g cube dwarf cichlid, 40g breeder nano community.
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I would cut the stem and replant the top. Add a root tab next to it as well. AR is a tough plant for me to grow, but I've managed to get two stems of the mini to take off finally. That tank has high light and CO2. I'll add a photo later when I get home if you'd like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would cut the stem and replant the top. Add a root tab next to it as well. AR is a tough plant for me to grow, but I've managed to get two stems of the mini to take off finally. That tank has high light and CO2. I'll add a photo later when I get home if you'd like.
Thank you. Given what I read, I should cut the top off and keep 3 or 4 nodes on there. Replant that. Do you think I should expect new growth on the bottom part of the stem that I cut the top off of?

As @evil8 mentioned, replant the top. Looking at your stems, I'm still not sure your light is strong enough for some of those plants. If you can get the AR to grow well, then maybe it is.
I don't think it is either. I didn't do enough research when I bought them. I asked the vendor for reds and easy plants... So I got what I got I guess. Ive been trying to figure out my light. Keep in mind Im going off of no experience here. Its a nicrew light. 95 par at 12" of air. It seems to be very bright! perhaps its just not bright enough. Again, I have nothing to base this off of.
 

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I don't think it is either. I didn't do enough research when I bought them. I asked the vendor for reds and easy plants... So I got what I got I guess. Ive been trying to figure out my light. Keep in mind Im going off of no experience here. Its a nicrew light. 95 par at 12" of air. It seems to be very bright! perhaps its just not bright enough. Again, I have nothing to base this off of.
You said you got this setup from someone who was growing the same plants right? Even the AR? I'm just looking at your stems and they look very leggy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You said you got this setup from someone who was growing the same plants right? Even the AR? I'm just looking at your stems and they look very leggy.
Not the same plants.. Are you referring to the rotala on the right?
 

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Thank you. Given what I read, I should cut the top off and keep 3 or 4 nodes on there. Replant that. Do you think I should expect new growth on the bottom part of the stem that I cut the top off of?
I'd cut it just above the second to last bare node and plant it so the substrate covers that last bare node. Without leaves I doubt you will get any new growth on the bare stem. Maybe... but most likely it will just die and melt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'd cut it just above the second to last bare node and plant it so the substrate covers that last bare node. Without leaves I doubt you will get any new growth on the bare stem. Maybe... but most likely it will just die and melt.
I will try this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, Rotala rotundifolia.

This is my plant list, althought Ive lost a couple of them. I havent been able to confidently ID everything unfortuantly.
Narrow leaf java fern,
Ludwigia glandulosa x repens,
Grotiola v.,
Anubias coffeefolia,
Pogostemon helferi,
AR pink,
Crypt ponderifolia,
Lobelia cardinalis
, Myriophyllum roraima,
, Rotala blood red,
, Ludwigia arcuata
, , Ludwigia atlantis,
Red Melon Sword
, Subwassertang
, , Ludwigia Super Red Mini,
Bolbitis heudelotii
, Echinodorus Aflame
, , Anubia Nana Golden,
Ludwigia Ovalis Pink
 

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Even Rotala rotundifolia usually gets reddish tops if the light is good. I see mostly green on leggy stems. 95 PAR at 12" is probably around 40 at 18". You might want to consider not "chasing" red plants that need good light and go with plants that do well in less. That will makes things easier until the tank fills out. How did the Bolbitis heudelotii do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Even Rotala rotundifolia usually gets reddish tops if the light is good. I see mostly green on leggy stems. 95 PAR at 12" is probably around 40 at 18". You might want to consider not "chasing" red plants that need good light and go with plants that do well in less. That will makes things easier until the tank fills out. How did the Bolbitis heudelotii do?
I agree. Im going to be getting a better light. Ive come to the conclusion that it is necessary. For now, Im just trying to keep them alive. The Rotala is turning light purple at the top most leaves, and the new stems are red.

Assuming I am looking at the correct plant, the Bolbitis heudelotii wasnt doing well but I didnt really understand proper care. I trimmed off the dead leaves and the new growth is looking pretty good. Please let me know if I am not looking at the correct plant.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, that look like Bolbitis heudelotii in the center of the pic. You don't have it buried in the substrate right, it's attached to that rock?
That is correct. I had it buried for 1 day before somebody pointed it out to me. I was a little upset/fristrated when I bought my plants. The guy was recommended to me. He was very informative and sold me some plants. But nothing came labeled and I didnt have a clue. I spent a considerable amount of time taking photos, using google lens and trying to ID plants so I knew where and how to plant them. I got most of it pretty close LOL. But yes, it has been attached to the rock. I have another one in the back doing equally as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The Bolbitis is one of my favs. Once it settles in it can really take over. Here it is in one of my setups comparing growth after 6 months.

That looks amazing. Less is more! I didn't realize its potential. What is your setup in regards to equipment and ferts that allowed that type of growth?
 

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That looks amazing. Less is more! I didn't realize its potential. What is your setup in regards to equipment and ferts that allowed that type of growth?
Thanks, This tank has co2, good light and dosing the water column with EI level ferts. I tend to do the planting around lots of hardscape, so yes your right for me less is more, since I enjoy the hardscape. To do that maintenance becomes even more important since you don't have the plant mass to uptake decomposing organics so good water changes and removing debris and being careful with feeding, etc. Co2 helps increase photosynthesis to help with uptake.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks, This tank has co2, good light and dosing the water column with EI level ferts. I tend to do the planting around lots of hardscape, so yes your right for me less is more, since I enjoy the hardscape. To do that maintenance becomes even more important since you don't have the plant mass to uptake decomposing organics so good water changes and removing debris and being careful with feeding, etc. Co2 helps increase photosynthesis to help with uptake.

I inject CO2. Im about 30ppm. But that may be too much with my current light. I enjoy hardscape as well, however this tank is a HUGE learning curve for me. I used Seriyu stone because its what came with the setup that I bought used and I liked the way it looks. But I then found out they leach a lot of mineral and now I have hard water. When I do my 55, Im going to do things a bit different.
 

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I inject CO2. Im about 30ppm. But that may be too much with my current light. I enjoy hardscape as well, however this tank is a HUGE learning curve for me. I used Seriyu stone because its what came with the setup that I bought used and I liked the way it looks. But I then found out they leach a lot of mineral and now I have hard water. When I do my 55, Im going to do things a bit different.
30ppm is fine, as long as your dosing. This tank of mine is all Seiryu stone, but it's mostly ferns, anubias, buces and moses which all grew fine, so you might have to just use what works with that setup. Tank alwys gets 50% weekly water changes which also reduces the effect of Seiryu.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Im dosing, but trying to figure out how much to dose. from what I gather, that is based off the light that im using. There are plants that dont do well with hard water, correct? I figured my German blue rams would suffer but they seem to be doing ok actually.
 
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