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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I setup my 32 gallon a few weeks ago and I'm using EI dosing, pressurized CO2, aquasoil, and high light. I've added filter media from an established tank to speed up the cycling process. I'm doing a fishless cycle.

Ammonia has been decreasing and is at 0.25ppm, nitrites are 2-5ppm, and nitrates I think are around 20ppm (I always have a hard time reading nitrates on the API test kit).

Green algae has started to appear on my glass, sand, rocks, and CO2 diffuser. I have some brown algae as well. I turned the light down to 50% from 100%, and I noticed a difference in the plants within 24 hours so I turned the light back up to 80% and increased the CO2. The CO2 is at a rate that's too fast to count, but is not quite a continuous stream yet.

Does anyone have any ideas as to how I can reduce the algae in my tank? Am I doing something wrong or should I be expecting algae during a cycle?

Thanks for the help.
 

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Co2 ferts and lighting is not the only thing that is needed to be considered when looking at a algae free tank.

Since you plants are far from.established, high lighting is only hurting you. You also likely have poor plant mass which is another problem. All the good bacteria and micro organisms have yet to grow and establish themselves.

You providing a opportunity for algae, a simple celled organism to go and thrive without much competition from the plants.

It is to be expected that newer setups will go through a phase where they are trying to establish themselves.

Do yourself a favor and reduce the intensity of your lighting, ensure you have a photoperiod of around 7 hours. Fill the tank with tons of fast growing easy plants for now. Over time replace them with that you want once you have things under control.
 

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Algae control

Co2 ferts and lighting is not the only thing that is needed to be considered when looking at a algae free tank.

Since you plants are far from.established, high lighting is only hurting you. You also likely have poor plant mass which is another problem. All the good bacteria and micro organisms have yet to grow and establish themselves.

You providing a opportunity for algae, a simple celled organism to go and thrive without much competition from the plants.

It is to be expected that newer setups will go through a phase where they are trying to establish themselves.

Do yourself a favor and reduce the intensity of your lighting, ensure you have a photoperiod of around 7 hours. Fill the tank with tons of fast growing easy plants for now. Over time replace them with that you want once you have things under control.
I certainly agree a large biomass of plants is part of the answer. Your tank is still very young. Try reading about spot treatment of glutaraldehyde. I spot treat 25 mls daily to keep my algae in control in my 135-gallon planted tank. Remember, this is only a tool rather than the solution.

Over time, 90% of the algae will disappear. The challenge is how to manage the remaining 10%.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great, thanks guys!

I have a lot of plant mass, but I realized after your posts that very little of it is fast growing plant mass. Here's my plant list:

Dwarf Hairgrass
Micranthemum monte carlo
staurogyne repens
alternanthera reineckii mini
rotala macrandra (pretty sure that's the one)
prospernica palustris
one java fern
rotala bonsai
two anubias nana petite
two ludwigia repens stems from a previous tank

The only fast-growing plants on that list are really only the staurogyne repens and the ludwigia.

My photoperiod is either 8 or 8.5 hours. Should I cut that down or reduce the light? When I last reduced the light I noticed within a day that the red plants were starting to turn green, which is why I increased the light intensity up to 80% from 50%.
 
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