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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This afternoon when I was at AirGas swapping my CO2 tank, I showed the guy there the dual stage regulator I'm planning on using. After inspecting the unit, he told me it is used for O2 and if I put CO2 through it, the diaphragm will be destroyed and do some "REAL" damage. Will this actually happen? As far as I remembered, you cannot use a CO2 regulator for O2 but the other way around is fine, am I right?

Here is what I got. It's a Vector GPT270D. The label says CO2. Anybody using this model?

Need your help on this one. Thank you!

Regulator:


Connector: I have a CGA320 ready to replace this.


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The Airgas guy saw a potential customer. People use regulators made for other gases all the time, and I have yet to hear of one failing because the diaphragm can't live with CO2. Now, get moisture in the regulator and you might run into a problem.
 

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Agreed. He wants your money or he doesn't know what he's talking about. A few people here might tell you to avoid regulators that have been used for certain corrosive gases as well. They generally just heard something somebody heard from somebody else and are passing it along as fact.

Any regulator, regardless of previous life, is fine for our purposes.
 

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Agreed. He wants your money or he doesn't know what he's talking about. A few people here might tell you to avoid regulators that have been used for certain corrosive gases as well. They generally just heard something somebody heard from somebody else and are passing it along as fact.

Any regulator, regardless of previous life, is fine for our purposes.
i agree with most of your points except for the corosive gas statement. wouldent corosive gas slowly eat away at the internals?
 

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I have used an oxygen regulator for a very long time. The only issue is the nipple, and you've got the replacement. Either the airgas guy is a moron or he was trying to make 400 bucks on you. Or both.

The regulator is clearly marked that it is for use with co2, the only difference from it and the "co2" version is the cga stem and nut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for the response. Looks like the research I did wasn't for nothing. :icon_mrgr


The next question: The CGA320 connector I got is a cheap looking aluminum one without the nylon washer. Where can I find a washer like that? If I want to get a decent CGA320 connector, where shall I look?

Thank you!
 

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The CGA320 connector shouldn't be made of aluminum. It has to be made of a metal strong enough to withstand a high torque when you attach it to the CO2 bottle. Those are designed to seal with a flat gasket, which needs to be compressed by torquing it onto the gas bottle. Aluminum might work, but the high torque could damage it, causing it to crack and separate from the bottle, releasing a blast of CO2 snow.
 

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i agree with most of your points except for the corosive gas statement. wouldent corosive gas slowly eat away at the internals?
If the reg is made for a corrosive gas, why would the corrosive gas eat away at it. Most of those are made of stainless steel to prevent this from happening. If anything that makes the reg more durable. The only thing I would recommend is to run some co2 through said regulator to get rid of any corrosive gas that is left in there before connecting anything on the end of it.
 

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Can't believe the guy told you it couldn't be used with co2, when there was a sticker on there that said "CARBON DIOXIDE" what a jerk. Some people do anything for a sale, even make you doubt your literacy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The CGA320 connector shouldn't be made of aluminum. It has to be made of a metal strong enough to withstand a high torque when you attach it to the CO2 bottle. Those are designed to seal with a flat gasket, which needs to be compressed by torquing it onto the gas bottle. Aluminum might work, but the high torque could damage it, causing it to crack and separate from the bottle, releasing a blast of CO2 snow.
Thanks a lot Mr Hoppy:cool:

I'll shop for a brass or chrome one.
 

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If the reg is made for a corrosive gas, why would the corrosive gas eat away at it. Most of those are made of stainless steel to prevent this from happening. If anything that makes the reg more durable. The only thing I would recommend is to run some co2 through said regulator to get rid of any corrosive gas that is left in there before connecting anything on the end of it.
i didnt relize the internals were SS. What is the diaphram made from? SS as well?
 

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Yes, if a regulator is made for corrosive gases, it is probably made entirely of stainless steel. However, most of the better quality brass regulators do have stainless diaphragms, especially the "high purity" models.
 

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Airgas guy got me scared...Regulator Question

First off the CGA connection designation for C02 is 320 the CGA designation for oxygen is 540. If the regulator was purchased for oxygen service you should never just change the CGA connection to a differnent gas connection, you are circumventing the safety feature of the regulator. Thats why it's not a one size fits all. If you don't believe me Google it. People have died because they changed a CGA connection on a regulator and placed it on the wrong gas. The only reason the nipple is replacible is because they break or get stripped because they are made our of brass or coated brass they are not alluminum. Not to mention that the calibration for a regulator for oxygen service on a high pressure cylinder at 2400 psi is different than that of a C02 cylinder at 350psi the gauges on the regulator are different and you will over draw the cylinder. Buy the correct regulator for the gas cylinder you are using. The Airgas guy wasn't interested in your cash he could possibly be saving your life.
 
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