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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got 2 cups of Hemianthus callitrichiodes (the cups are made by UNS, but I bought them from Bruce). They have no roots at all....some little teeny spikes of root in certain places, but 90% of the plant has no visible root. Here’s what I have done:

I drained the tank, placed them on the substrate, and then placed a piece of insert mesh over them, weighed down using the lead weights received with my other plants. I’m hoping roots would grow into my ADA Tropica substrate and then I can remove the mesh. The mesh definitely blocks some light, but I have moved my light closer to the tank. I also dose CO2 at just above 1bps. The tank is 60P (17gal), and it’s only a week old. pH runs around 6.0-6.8, GH and KH 1-2 degrees, total ammonia roughly 1-2ppm, and I’ve just started to see a touch of nitrites, and 5ppm nitrates this A.M. (which surprises me...but that’s another story).

I’m just looking for advice from others who grow HC. Does this weird, made-up method have any prayer of working? Or should I scrap it, throw out the HC, and buy it from a different source as a potted plant? As an aside, so far I’m not a fan of tissue culture plants...the potted or lead bunch plants look much better.

Thanks, everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah ok. So, some of the chunks are very tiny (maybe 5mm diameter), but others are very wide where I didn’t break apart the clumps. Should I drain the tank, break up the large clumps, and just push each tiny plant of a few stems in the substrate? I have seen something like that in pictures. I thought they were burying roots though. So how much of the plant needs to be above substrate to keep it from dying? (Maybe that’s a dumb question...or maybe I’m asking it in a dumb way...I just don’t want to end up with a carpet of decaying organic matter just below my substrate hahaha. So I want to do it right.)
 

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I've always just pushed them down into the substrate with twizzers and then pulled up a bit that usually lets the grains of substrate fall into where your planting and it holds them better. I would break them up into tiny groups. I've even planted a stem at a time. It's usually easier to plant that way and it will spread better as more light gets to each stem. As long as the leaves are above substrate you should be fine.
 
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