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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having some serious debates with my husband over this, so I thought I'd just ask here and see if anyone has first-hand experience with creating glass or acrylic dividers in glass tanks. I have a big 40-gallon LONG tank I'd like to section off a bit with a 6" glass or plexiglass wall for some hatchling turtles someone brought to me (Yes, I realize as they grow they will need a bigger tank; I am a foster for rescued reptiles from time-to-time). I want to build a "land" feature (basically a haul-out) for them on one end. So my question is this -- the tank width is 16" and I want to make the wall about 6" high; can I just use a pure silicone and can I silicone little braces into the corners on each side to stabilize it? I know that ZooMed makes a tank similar to this, but I really would prefer they have the length of this tank so they have more swimming area.

Thanks!
Jennie
 

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Yes, silicone glass braces in the corners, and set the plexi on the braces . The silicone should hold well enough to the plexi for this purpose . Another option I have done is used pvc pipe to create a floating platform, topped with plastic egg crate or other suitable material. Short ramp descends into the water . Since it floats and has an air space under the platform, less risk of someone getting stuck . You can secure the float to one end to allow for a heat lamp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the heads-up on the adhesive! I would just drop a Rubbermaid shoebox or something in there, but these guys are really curious and would probably get stuck if there was ANY crevice at all. The box would probably work really well for the juvies, though!

pure silicon does not stick well to acrylic.
I have never used it supposedly this stuff does a better job on acrylic
https://jet.com/product/detail/aa2a...d=403-907727&gclid=CMra_-eimcsCFQIKaQodqpICHA

What if you made an entire box out of acrylic and then placed it on one end of the tank and filled it with sand?
 

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You can do what your suggesting, but it's a lot more trouble than it's worth, and will tend to make a mess of things. Also, you need to work on a clean, dry tank to get any adhesive to stick.

Your best option here is to go out and get a small tank with all the equipment, and put your hatchling turtles in there. It's best for the turtles too.
 

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People silicone glass partitions to make sumps all the time. You need to find some glass that is good and thick though. You would mark the outside of the tank for position then mask the partition and tank to make cleaner lines. Clean the areas where silicone needs to stick with rubbing alcohol, put down a thick line of silicone on the line, put the partition in and run your gloved finger on each side of the joint to push silicone into the joint, pull the masking tape off as soon as you are satisfied with your joints. If you cut the glass yourself it is easy to rub the extremely sharp edges with a sandpaper block to dull them. I doubt you would need to use additional braces as one side would have water and the other sand so pressure would be quite even. GE silicone I for doors and windows is the one, not the one for kitchens and baths and allow a week for curing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's not a question of having the equipment -- I have filters, "docks", etc... I wanted to create a "land" area for these guys so that they could have some plants and moist soil to muck around in. I've found they do much better in this sort of habitat when they've been taken from the wild (they were seized from someone that was trying to illegally import reptiles). Anyway, I have a great protected outdoor setup that allows them to do this, but it's still too cold here in Denver right now to put hatchlings outdoors.

You can do what your suggesting, but it's a lot more trouble than it's worth, and will tend to make a mess of things. Also, you need to work on a clean, dry tank to get any adhesive to stick.

Your best option here is to go out and get a small tank with all the equipment, and put your hatchling turtles in there. It's best for the turtles too.
Bump: Here's an odd question -- have you ever created a floating "island" of soil or moss for your guys to haul out onto? I've seen some pretty cool and elaborate PVC floating docks, but not one with plants. Thanks for the advice on creating the divider. I will be able to transition them outdoors fairly soon, but want them to be comfortable while they're inside. :) What kind of turtles do you keep? My "personal" turtles are a trio of boxies (two western and one eastern -- don't tell her that, though!) and then a Malaysian Box Turtle and a Red-cheek Scorpion mud. ALWAYS seem to have RES fostering here. :p

Yes, silicone glass braces in the corners, and set the plexi on the braces . The silicone should hold well enough to the plexi for this purpose . Another option I have done is used pvc pipe to create a floating platform, topped with plastic egg crate or other suitable material. Short ramp descends into the water . Since it floats and has an air space under the platform, less risk of someone getting stuck . You can secure the float to one end to allow for a heat lamp.
Bump: Thank you for the advice!!! This was exactly what I was looking for! There is a glass shop fairly close to here that should be able to get me whatever I'm looking for. I think 1/4" tempered would be adequate, don't you?

People silicone glass partitions to make sumps all the time. You need to find some glass that is good and thick though. You would mark the outside of the tank for position then mask the partition and tank to make cleaner lines. Clean the areas where silicone needs to stick with rubbing alcohol, put down a thick line of silicone on the line, put the partition in and run your gloved finger on each side of the joint to push silicone into the joint, pull the masking tape off as soon as you are satisfied with your joints. If you cut the glass yourself it is easy to rub the extremely sharp edges with a sandpaper block to dull them. I doubt you would need to use additional braces as one side would have water and the other sand so pressure would be quite even. GE silicone I for doors and windows is the one, not the one for kitchens and baths and allow a week for curing.
 
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