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Hi,
Sorry if this this subject has been discussed before, but I can't seem to find the thread if it has.
Basically, I want to know how one goes about adding fish that like to be in schools to a smaller aquarium (10-20g) that can't handle such a sudden jump in bioload. For example, it seems to be recommended that most tetras and other small fish be kept in schools of at least 6. But adding 6 tetras all at once to a 10g seems like a bad idea. Do you just add 2 or 3 every couple of weeks until you get your desired number, even though this means having your first couple in there alone for a month or so?
Also, will adding them at different times affect how they interact with each other and keep them from schooling together?
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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I generally just add them at once, and do a few water changes if needed. If you're running any other tanks, you might bring over some additional biomedia from the established tank.

If you're adding "nano" fish (ie, dwarf rasboras) then the bioload addition truly is quite light.

If the tank is heavily planted that should help absorb any additional ammonia, as well.
 

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I think that is kind of over rated. I added 25 fish to my 20 gallon 6 days after start up. 14 cardinals, 7 brown pencils, 3 cory cats, and a small blue diamond discus. Only one cardinal has died and that was weeks later from a natural issue. I have since added 16 more fish(3 more browns, 10 pygmy cory's, 3 danio chaprae) and many shrimp (2 month old tank). If your water is fine, add fish. If you have heavy plants and good bio-load on filter(canister), your tank can handle more fish. You would never guess I had 41 fish in my tank if you looked at it. You would guess around 20 at most. The cardinals stay together in the middle, the browns stay together at the top, and cories all over the bottom. So it's not crowded at all. Even though it sounds like it.
 

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If the tank is established, it should not be an issue. The good bacteria can reporduce about every 8 hours if I remember correctly. So, if you doubled the bioload in a healthy tank, the bacteria should be able to increase their population to meet the added load in less than a day (all other things being equal). Again, this assumes a healthy, established tank. If the tank is new, all bets are off.
 

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lol....i add 20 cardinals into my 185US gallon at once...l=.=
 
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