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Hi there,
I've been doing some research on this forum but haven't really found what I wanted.
I'm rescaping my tank (ADA 90p) and this time I'm going for a big slope on the right with a big piece of driftwood that's gonna be partly poking out of the water. I would like to put plants on that part of the wood.
I have read many different things when it comes to plants that would be able to be grow emersed on that setup. It's not clear if their roots have to be in the water or not, if having no substrate is gonna be a problem as they would be attached to the wood... and if any plants would work or if should only do pond or terrestrial plants. I don't know what would work or not. Last time I tried a piece of anubia mini emersed just over the water, it died.
What advice can you give me? What plants can I safely use? Show me pictures of your tanks!
Thank you
Elsa.
 

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Hi there,
I've been doing some research on this forum but haven't really found what I wanted.
I'm rescaping my tank (ADA 90p) and this time I'm going for a big slope on the right with a big piece of driftwood that's gonna be partly poking out of the water. I would like to put plants on that part of the wood.
I have read many different things when it comes to plants that would be able to be grow emersed on that setup. It's not clear if their roots have to be in the water or not, if having no substrate is gonna be a problem as they would be attached to the wood... and if any plants would work or if should only do pond or terrestrial plants. I don't know what would work or not. Last time I tried a piece of anubia mini emersed just over the water, it died.
What advice can you give me? What plants can I safely use? Show me pictures of your tanks!
Thank you
Elsa.
Well out of my field but could start w/ bromes I believe.

Water isn't a real issue as long as there is enough oxygen (think hydroponics)
Plant roots generally don't drowned but can run out of oxygen/gas exchange
The nutrients and "attachments" are important.
Also mosses grow well on wet wood..

Maintaining sufficient humidity might be an issue. Adding like sphagnum moss or coconut fiber to the "stump" might help.
You would expand the possibilities..

Then there is mangroves but believe one needs pretty good lighting
 

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Tough to say without seeing your setup. Mosses that are touching the water help wick water upwards, and then you can plant aquatic plants in the moss. That only works if the plants are gonna be about an inch above the water line, otherwise a very small pump with airline tubing could keep the moss moist. Some very vigorous growers in that kind of setup are hydrocotyle tripartita and micranthemum Monte carlo.

Bromeliads and air plants are probably the best if you want something above the water line, and don't want to have to mist constantly. Rabbit ferns (davallia genus) can also be grown epiphytically.

Any number of common houseplants can be grown with roots in the water, such as peace lilies, pothos, and philodendrons. Most pond plants I've found do not like to be bare-root in water.

Finally, many ferns do very well with their rhizomes just shoved in to cracks in wood near the water line. They can even have their rhizome submerged. Boston fern and maidenhair ferns both come to mind.



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