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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help finding species that live in the Acandí river basin. The only fish I get when I search for species in and around Acandí is hyphessobrycon columbianus, which is a great centerpiece schooling fish, but I'm looking for more than just Colombian tetras for my tank. This is for my upcoming Colombian Biotope, and I'm asking in the hope of narrowing it down to the rivers and tributaries found around the town of Acandí. Any help would be appreciated, as google searches have reached a dead for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Have you checked mongabay?

What major river does the Acandi feed? You might be able to figure it out from there.
The Rio Acandi doesn't feed a larger river, it flows directly into the ocean

Here is a 95 page PDF listing of all the fish in rivers in Columbia. Did you read this one? (The link does not "open" it automatically down loads to your down-load folder)
very interesting, but the PDF doesn't include the Acandi (probably because the river in question is fairly small). as for Mongabay, all I get when I search Acandi, Rio Acandi, or river Acandi, is pictures of cattle crossings and deforestation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the geography lesson.

Maybe you can try here. Home | Biotope Aquarium Forum

Kind if a dead forum, but maybe.
Definitely a dead forum, the latest posts are from the middle of last year.

The Rio Acandi is one of the northernmost rivers in Colombia, almost being a part of Central America. with that in mind, what sort of species could be expected to be found there?
 

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No idea. Can you find information on lakes that are close to it? Might give you a better idea of the fauna is more central vs South in nature. I tend to think that a typical northern Colombian river would give you a good idea, as the likelihood of them being connected somehow in the relatively recent past would give them a similar fauna. That's only a guess though.

And why this river? Just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No idea. Can you find information on lakes that are close to it? Might give you a better idea of the fauna is more central vs South in nature. I tend to think that a typical northern Colombian river would give you a good idea, as the likelihood of them being connected somehow in the relatively recent past would give them a similar fauna. That's only a guess though.

And why this river? Just curious.
I want to do this river because I already have the Colombian tetras (I'll buy more for the big tank) and I want to create the most realistic environment for them. If I can't get enough info on the area, then I'll just go for a generic Colombian biotope. As for lakes, there are none nearby. It's worth checking out the area on google earth, you'll see just how far north it is (it's almost the farthest north you can go in Colombia, with only the town of Capurgana being farther north). Fishbase shows that a few livebearers are native to Colombia, and I can only assume that they are in the northernmost parts of it, so including mollies in the biotope might be a good idea.
 

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Ya, I saw it, I guess I'll have to make an account, but I don't know if I'll be able to translate it (I speak a bit of Spanish, but not THAT much)
A journal like that should have the Latin names. You might be able to skim through and just look for them. They should jump out, especially the more common ones. Plus the abstract was translated into English, perhaps the whole book is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A journal like that should have the Latin names. You might be able to skim through and just look for them. They should jump out, especially the more common ones. Plus the abstract was translated into English, perhaps the whole book is.
I've created an account, and have access to the book, but it's a series of pictures uploaded to the site, not a string of copy-pasteable text. With that in mind, I can probably post the pages here, see if there is another way of dechipering them
 

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I love that you've decided to go so specific! I know it's gonna take a bunch of research to do but stick with it! Maybe see if you can find any accounts from private collection trips? You might be able to find them from people looking for a variety of fish.


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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I love that you've decided to go so specific! I know it's gonna take a bunch of research to do but stick with it! Maybe see if you can find any accounts from private collection trips? You might be able to find them from people looking for a variety of fish.


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Thanks! I'd love to stick with it, but if I can't find any information about the area, then I'll have to switch to a general Colombian biotope. as far as private collection trips go, I haven't found any accounts online, and I don't know many hobbyists IRL, so I'm kind of at an impass
 

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I've created an account, and have access to the book, but it's a series of pictures uploaded to the site, not a string of copy-pasteable text. With that in mind, I can probably post the pages here, see if there is another way of dechipering them
That stinks.

As you skim them, look for the obvious ones, at least what seem like they would be--- Corydoras, hypancistrus, hemigrammus, hyphessobrycon, poecilia, micropoecilia, acara. With the exception of the acara, most of those should jump right out from the Spanish. And species names, e.g. schwartzi or axelrodi certainly will.

And with your basic knowledge of Spanish, don't be surprised if you can put things together contextually, or with a minimum of google translate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
That stinks.

As you skim them, look for the obvious ones, at least what seem like they would be--- Corydoras, hypancistrus, hemigrammus, hyphessobrycon, poecilia, micropoecilia, acara. With the exception of the acara, most of those should jump right out from the Spanish. And species names, e.g. schwartzi or axelrodi certainly will.

And with your basic knowledge of Spanish, don't be surprised if you can put things together contextually, or with a minimum of google translate.
I've tried doing that, and it sort of works, but there aren't many species named in it. The few names that there were though:

LORICARIIDAE
Chaetostoma fisheri

SYGTHIDAE
Microphis brachyurus lineatus

GOBIDAE
Awaous tajasica

BOTHIDAE
Citharicthys spiloterus

SOLEIDAE
Achirus lineatus

TETRAODONTIDAE
Sphoeroides testudineus

Bump: Here are the pages:
 

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