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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm going to have a 75 gallon available relatively soon. I was wondering about some fauna possible combinations. I will plant it heavily.

I have so far:

2 WC A. agassizii (1M/1F)
7 T. heteromorpha
3 C. chuna (dwarf gouramis)

They are in a 14 gallon at the moment, so I'm wondering what other larger fish I can put with them. I would like to increase the number of rasboras to 20 or so, some cories, a geophagus species and either p. scalare or discus. Would these work, and how many? Is it possible to keep angels, a smaller geophagus species [which?(1M/2F,3F?)] and discus together? Thanks a lot.

Adam
 

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Plant Lover
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I am no Discus dude, never had 'em, but I think you are right to research this with care. Seems to me somewhere I heard angels and discus are not a great combo. Also think I would double check about the aggies being with the discus. Again I am no discus dude, but seems like the aggies behaviour could sometimes freak out the discus.

I am partial to South American biotopes, and had I room (and a wife who would tolerate) a tank that size, I would go for it. And I would start my stocking with major schools of Cardinal Tetras and Rummy Nose. I would quarantine the CT's because often there is an initial die off, but the survivors are hardy. I have small schools in my 29, along with cories (adolphoi) and A. agassisii and they are striking.

Also had I room I would look into gettting a barb I saw here recently (maculatus?) saw it at a local LFS and never anywhere else. Got the name from them but need to find the scrap of paper. Beautiful! Green bodybut with other colors, with a black spot in the middle of the body and green iridescence, and I think a yellow tail. There were about 6 inches long and very mellow. Had I space that would be a first choice.
 

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I am no Discus dude, never had 'em, but I think you are right to research this with care. Seems to me somewhere I heard angels and discus are not a great combo. Also think I would double check about the aggies being with the discus. Again I am no discus dude, but seems like the aggies behaviour could sometimes freak out the discus.
Why do you think angels and discus are not often compatible?
1. Angels are voracious eaters whereas discus simply are grazers and will take their time to eat.
2. Angels are more immune to most diseases whereas discus easily succumb in most cases.
3. Angels are quite aggressive. Let alone the discus being shy and most often will not defend themselves.
Also had I room I would look into gettting a barb I saw here recently (maculatus?) saw it at a local LFS and never anywhere else. Got the name from them but need to find the scrap of paper. Beautiful! Green bodybut with other colors, with a black spot in the middle of the body and green iridescence, and I think a yellow tail. There were about 6 inches long and very mellow. Had I space that would be a first choice.
Pics pls? :icon_mrgr

IMO, I would stick with discus/angels, rams, apistogrammas, tetras, hatchets, plecs and cories. The choice is yours. Be careful with what you are picking. Most tetras get consumed by discus and angels particularly the cardinals and neons. Tetras are the natural prey of angelfish and discus in the wild.

As for plecs, some will consume plants but if given veggies as part of their diet, they may ignore the plants. As for cories, make sure your substrate does not have sharp edges which can cut their barbels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the replies.

I'm still not sure about which to get between either angels or discus. Which of the two would be more compatible with the smaller fish/dwarf gouramis that I have? Based on looks, I would probably get the discus, but they are quite delicate. Still undecided.

What about the geophagus. Are they compatible with any of the fish I already have plus the angels or discus? I don't want any monster geophagus, maybe ones that get up to 4", or perhaps a little larger, more peaceful ones (if there is such a beast).

Adam
 

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Now that I think about it, Geophagus means "earth eater" so they won't be good fish for most planted takes. They dig a lot.
 

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I'd get discus. They are far more peaceful than angels but at the expense of their delicate state. Angels can get aggressive and any new fish will be considered as intruders so it is advisable to get the angels last but be forewarned that any new fish as a replacement after getting angels may not be safe. Not unless the tank is heavily-planted anyway.
 

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Bluebell, thanks for confirming/ detailing my suspicions about angel/discus compatibility for Adam.

As for the pic of the barb, I will have to call the LFS and get the name again, then I will post a link to a picture.
 

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Thanks for all the replies.

I'm still not sure about which to get between either angels or discus. Which of the two would be more compatible with the smaller fish/dwarf gouramis that I have? Based on looks, I would probably get the discus, but they are quite delicate. Still undecided.

What about the geophagus. Are they compatible with any of the fish I already have plus the angels or discus? I don't want any monster geophagus, maybe ones that get up to 4", or perhaps a little larger, more peaceful ones (if there is such a beast).

Adam
What water parameters (gh, kh, ph) will you be able to maintain?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To be honest, I've kept fish for 15 years and I've never known the pH, kH or gH of any of my water. I've kept angels, other softwater fish, african cichlids, amphibians, gouramis, a slew of tetras...a little of everything. I've almost never had a water quality problem that I couldn't account for.

But I can tell you is that I will have pressurized CO2. This will create a drop in the pH. My water is about neutral, slightly alkaline (from what I hear). The aquarium will be heavily planted.

I think I will go with the angels. I don't want to have to worry about the fragile discus, and my fish are already voracious eaters. I wouldn't want them to be unable to eat. An LFS I frequent got a shipment of wild angels, and I may go with them. But I will take it slowly and add the dithers first/set the tank up first. I need to move some africans to a new 150 first.

As for the geophagus, the who phagocytosis of the earth is not a good idea...I agree. Any other interesting cichlids or otherwise I could keep with the angels, apistos, gouramis, cories, and rasboras? Thanks.

Adam
 

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The number of years you have kept fish is really immaterial and my question was only asked so I would have enough information to provide some good insight base on my experience with South American fish.

I don't find discus to be nearly as fragile as many suggest. In fact, I find them to be a very hardy fish but, I'll admit that most of my fish are wild-caught and not line bred for color traits. I don't keep angelfish with my discus anymore since everytime I've tried it the discus beat the crap out of my angelfish. A few months ago my discus killed full grown wild geophagus steindachneri so those that think discus are fragile have either made them that way or maybe never kept them in a community tank.

I would recommend that you find out what your water parameters are and what you can comfortably maintain for a period of time before you consider keeping any wild-caught species from the Amazon. There is a world of difference between tank-raised fish and wilds as far as what conditions they will tolerate. Some species adjust sooner or better than others and often times the location where they were collected will dictate what you can get away with. I do not consider domestic angelfish to be a softwater species at all. I've kept them and spawned them in the same water as my Tanganyikan cichlids. Try that with wilds and more times than not you will end up with total grief. Low ph can help the situation some however, the hardness can still pose more problems than you may realize. Lowering the ph with co2 also reduces the oxygen levels in the tank which can provide very negative results.

As always, this is just my opinion and if you ask enough people you will eventually get the answers you want to hear.
 

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As per request, here is a link to a picture of the barb I mentioned above:

http://www.israquarium.co.il/FishPhoto/Puntius%20filamentosus%20male.jpg

Puntius filamentosis... None of the pics on the web do justice to this two specimens I saw in the display tank, but this is closest, subtle but gorgeous color, and apparently very mellow. They seem not to have a big place in the hobby these days. The folks at the LFS said they are very mellow. Perhaps not suitable for a SA tank, but on my current dream for a bigger (dream again) tank.
 

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Children Boogie
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If you're a fairly new to fish keeping, I'd leave out the discus. And If your tap water is manageable to where it's easy to make it soft then I'd go with discus... Otherwise no.
 

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its not just making the water soft to care for discus, you need multiple sets of filtration to just get the water perametres right. atleast i do
 
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