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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
OK, I've been dreaming about getting a 75 gal tank for strictly Cichlids and I've gathered a list of the Cichlids that I want to put in the tank. It will probably grow, so bare with me.

The List:
Aulonocara baenschi (Sunshine Peacock)
Hemichromis lifalili (Red Jewel Cichlid)
Iodotropheus sprengerae (Rusty Cichlid)

Are they all compatible together? Are they all freshwater fish? If there is any thing wrong with compatibility, PLEASE TELL ME. Even if its THE smallest thing that could have a small chance of going wrong, TELL ME. I don't want to spend 600 dollars on setting up the 75 and buying fish, then just have it explode in my face. If you know something that could go wrong SAY IT. Don't just sit in the background and be silent.

Thank you in advanced.
 

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Might be wrg but I think you only keep Peacocks with other peacocks.

I think Tang tanks are the best...there are a variety of smaller fish (shellDwellers) and larger fish that can all be kept together.

I will look up some info.
 

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Here was what I was going to setup a 30gal with

Neolamprologus similis (6) multies
julidochromis transcriptus (6)
Altolamprologus calvus (2)







Those are a few of my favs but I think Lake Tang fish allow you a lot more choices and quantity. Maybe not as vibrant as some of the others But I would love to have a tang tank one day.
 

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you basically have two different biotopes in your tank, and to different types of cichlids behavioral wise,

The peacocks and rustles are from lake Malawi. Mixing the peacock types is not a great Idea as one will surely pick on the other, often fatally. These gues can be kept as single males or in harems of one male with multiple females - females are very drab so often a nice male specimen will be used as a centerpiece. the rustles are a nice, mellow tempered mbuna that does best in groups of it's own kind, like most mbuna. All these Malawi fish derive from somewhat hard and basic type waters, where there are lots of rocks, tons of algae, and very few plants.

The Jewels and apistogramma types on the other hand, are monogomous type breeders from the rivers of west Africa, where the water is softer and more acid, and there is lots of plant life.

Certainly choosing between a rift lake setup and a riverine setup is important, since the fish have such different needs and behaviours that can prove very incompatible. if a planted tank is what you are after, the riverine biotope is probably your best option, though there are plants which will work well in rift lake setups too.

I don't know how fellows here like people recommending outside sources, but you ought to check out www.cichlid-forum.com - they have a ton of great cichlid information and articles focusing on them. For dwarf cichlids like apistos, apistogramma.com is worth a peek.
 

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peacocks can be kept with any number of milder type Haps and - mbuna. When they are kept with other peacocks it will be a crowd of them to help disperse aggression. In the wild peacocks are much like betta - males being solitary and females living in groups. I don't mix them because though it can 'work', it's far from their natural element. there is an exception - Jacob peacocks can be very aggressive and should never be kept with other types.
 

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Are they all compatible together? Are they all freshwater fish?....
I hope you will do specific research on the species your are considering. To answer the question, yes they are all freshwater fish.

As for the mixture, Apsitso and larger African fish DO NOT MIX. Apistos require a much different habitat then the African fish listed. Apsitos like softer water (though they can tolerate harder water) they also appreciate bog wood, leaves, and tanks with lots of hiding places, like planted tanks. The African fish will grow much larger and boisterous. they will prefer harder water with larger rocks to claim territory as well as a few large caves for retreats, they will uproot and eat most plants.

Peacocks are not as aggressive as other Mbunas, but with small fish like Apistos, you might see some expensive fish become food.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So no American Cichlids with African Cichlids or a only African Cichlid tank?
 

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That would be pretty awesome!
The large numbers help disperse the aggression as well as if its a species tank their is no fish of another color or species to single out and beat up on. 20+ will show some awesome behavior, without any injuries :)

Agreed...with LIMITED males, which goes back to KNOWING WHAT YOU'RE DOING.
Yes usuualy limited males helps with the aggression problems, but in a larger tank with a large number, the males back off significantly! But yes I stillrecomend less males then females. like 1:3.

sorry to derail, back to your thread.

can you tell us more about how you plan on spacing that tank? Africans generally like a rock scape with sand to dig around in. If we know what you would like the tank to look like, we can recommend fish that will fit into your plans and help narrow your search.
 

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we can recommend fish that will fit into your plans and help narrow your search.
Totally agree, would love to help.

BTW what's your pH out of the tap. Granted nothing wrg with throwing in massive amounts of THR to bump it up, and add to the appearance. Just dont go crazy with the lighting since it really isnt needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I plan on using a lot of rocks in the aquascapes, there will be a good amount of plants too, though. Probably low light ones that grow fairly quick. Are there some African Cichlids that wont eat plants or do they all eat plants. None of the species that I have on my list are convicts, right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A riverine biotope would be the easiest way to explain it.
 

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I plan on using a lot of rocks
Are there some African Cichlids that wont eat plants

It's not so much eating them, they do nip but its more on the lines of uprooting them. Now there are just a FEW plants that they tend to not mess with.
Anubias, Java Fern (many varieties) Onion plant (Crinum thaianum &crinum calamistratum) I have even seen Java moss used, tied to wood.
 
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