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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was hoping someone with lots of nature aquarium experience could give me some guidance as to what I should be shooting for in trimming my plants and what I could do to improve the general layout of my tank.

The tank has only been up and running for a month now and I've seen some pretty crazy growth. Initially I planted a ton of stem plants to help suck up as much of the ammonia as possible and it seems to have definitely benefited the plants as they grew super fast.


Here's a link to a larger view: http://i.imgur.com/r5pN7.jpg

more photos info in my tank journal thread:
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/t...um/147417-ada-60p-oregon-updated-10-10-a.html

I'm wondering if I shouldn't be planning on removing some of these stem plants to thin things out a little bit soon. Along the back wall from left to right I have Red Ludwigia, Rotala, more Ludwigia, and then a Wisteria which has sunk some deep roots. and grown pretty full. In the middle and foreground I have baby tears which are getting pretty tall as I want to wait for them to establish before I trim them back too aggressively.

I'd like to thin out the background a bit I think while still maintaining a good sense of depth, I feel guilty throwing plants away but I think I need to start trimming these back considerably, just don't know what I should be targetting... Thinking I need to add something in the back left corner to bring the height along the back wall to move of a V shape, taller plants on the outside corners, shorter plants in the center. I'd also like to add a blyxa japonica or two to the midground to bring some more green in, the tank is getting really red. I was thinking at the base of the driftwood on the right-hand side would be a good spot for it.

Any advice? thanks in advance.
 

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one thing to remember, most stems LOVE to be trimmed. If you trim them back 4-5 nodes out of the substrate, replant the tops leave the bottoms, the bottoms will sprout several side shoots, after a bit of growth, trim again just above the first trim, so on and so on, very soon you will have very thick bushes of stems.

here is a good link on how to achieve this.
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/aquascaping/57960-pruning-timeline.html

when you reach the thickness you want, then sell or give away the trimmins
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
one thing to remember, most stems LOVE to be trimmed. If you trim them back 4-5 nodes out of the substrate, replant the tops leave the bottoms, the bottoms will sprout several side shoots, after a bit of growth, trim again just above the first trim, so on and so on, very soon you will have very thick bushes of stems.

here is a good link on how to achieve this.
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/aquascaping/57960-pruning-timeline.html

when you reach the thickness you want, then sell or give away the trimmins
I've already done that once, and the trimmings from the top from the rotala are nearly to the top of the tank again in like two weeks time. These suckers grow fast...

guess I was concerned that it would get TOO dense at some point. I want to add some more green back into the background so I'm thinking maybe I'll pull out a few of the rotala clumps at some point. not sure if any of the shops around here will buy them or allow me to trade them in but I guess it's worth trying.
 

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I've already done that once, and the trimmings from the top from the rotala are nearly to the top of the tank again in like two weeks time. These suckers grow fast...

guess I was concerned that it would get TOO dense at some point. I want to add some more green back into the background so I'm thinking maybe I'll pull out a few of the rotala clumps at some point. not sure if any of the shops around here will buy them or allow me to trade them in but I guess it's worth trying.
lol yea, there is a point where it does get too dense, and your stems will loose lower leaves, when that happens, you uproot, and start again with the upper portions. stems are a high maintenance plant. There are some great green plants you can get, take a look for Rotala Rotundifolia 'green', it is tough as nails, grows thick in no time, and tends to hold onto its leaves if given enough co2. it has a lighter green color to the leaves to, and would fit in nicely in your tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
lol yea, there is a point where it does get too dense, and your stems will loose lower leaves, when that happens, you uproot, and start again with the upper portions. stems are a high maintenance plant. There are some great green plants you can get, take a look for Rotala Rotundifolia 'green', it is tough as nails, grows thick in no time, and tends to hold onto its leaves if given enough co2. it has a lighter green color to the leaves to, and would fit in nicely in your tank.
is it just sort of an accepted fact then that you'll be throwing away a lot of plants if you grow stems? I'm thinking I could trim these things every week or every other week and they'd still be hitting the top of the water regularly.
 

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Don't feel guilty...If it's a plant that is really common, I just toss it. If it's something you would have to look a little bit more for, I throw it in my "junk drawer".

I have a 10 Gallon high with a power head, that has a 10 watt spiral on it. Comes in handy when I want to keep some cutting, but don't know what to do with them right away.
 

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Love the scape!!:eek:

Wow what amazing growth you have. Are you injecting Co2? What is your light and size of tank?

Now is a good time to offer up some for ROAK or sell, for weather is perfect for shipping in most places.
 
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