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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
It was too cold to work in the shop on Sunday, so no progress on the doors

I did finish getting the skin mounted on the frame today.

It gets a little tight in the corners.



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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Doors and plumbing design today.

Spent a few hours at home depot and Lowe's trying to come up with the plumbing for the equipment. I'm going to try to keep everything under the tank.

Not sure if the canister filter will keep up, so I'm prepared to run a booster pump if needed.

Missmeasured two of the parts on the first door, but luckily I caught it before I'd have to start over.



The plumbing will look something like this :

Starting at bottom left and going counter clockwise :
Outlet to tank
Ball valve to force water through equipment
Inlet from filter
Ball valve to shut off equipment
1/2" drain to drain equipment
Union
Temp probe
Ph probe
Co2 injection
Co2 reactor
Inline heater
Ball valve to shut off equipment



The pH probe will need to be calibrated from time to time. The idea is that I can shut the two equipment ball valves and use the drain to drain the plumbing far enough to remove the pH probe. I'll be able to turn off the co2 and heater while calibrating to keep it from causing issues.

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I’m guessing that you will use the red button on the CO2 reactor to purge the air from the loop?


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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I’m guessing that you will use the red button on the CO2 reactor to purge the air from the loop?


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Either that, or I can loosen the compression fitting on the heater and let air escape there too... I think.

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
After sleeping on this quite a bit, I think I've changed my mind on putting all the probes in the plumbing. It makes for a pretty big loop that starts to get a little long for the stand. It'd fit, but it'd be tight.

If I take the probes out, it shortens the loop quite a bit. I do still want to keep the heater in the loop.

I can easily 3d print some mounts for the temperature and pH probe to hide them in the corner of the tank.

I also finished the build on the stand. All the hardware is installed, so I'm ready to tear it all down and start sanding, painting, and finishing.

Flowerpot Houseplant Plant Wood Gas


White Font Gas Cylinder Machine
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I got to spend this afternoon in the shop working on the plumbing. I built the entire loop and it's now up and running on a 5 gallon bucket.

I'll let it run this way while I finish the stand to give it plenty of time to show me where any leaks are. The water in the little container on the floor is from purging the air out of the top of the heater loop. The cheap hose I'm using on the return kept kinking. I found if I put a zip tie where the kink shows up, it forces the tubing round. I need to go buy some more of the thicker tubing for the final return line.

There's quite a bit of flow coming out of the end of all of this, so I think the 307 will be plenty big for the 40b tank. The water started off at 53F (got it out of my swimming pool) and the setup is in my shop that was at 70F. It took it about an hour to get to the current temperature, which I think is about right for a 200w heater.

I 3d printed a test bracket to hold the plumbing. I miss-measured and it ended up a bit oversized. I fixed the design and have new brackets currently printing.

The thicker tubing was really tight getting it on the fittings. I found if I heated it slightly with a heat gun I could get it on there easier and then clamp down with the hose clamps. I have some braided sleeving coming that I want to try sleeving the hoses with. More just out of curiosity of seeing what it'd look like than anything else.

I moved the other power cable up off of the floor since taking this picture just in case something leaks. The shop has a natural slope towards the garage door to the right of this picture, so if it leaks, it will just run towards the door. Also both of the cords are plugged into GFCI outlets.

Automotive tire Electrical wiring Engineering Gas Motor vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
With all the plumbing you ended up with a canister filter rather than a sump ?
My tank isn't drilled and I absolutely despise siphon overflows. I had one clog up and overflow a saltwater tank one time and cause a lot of damage.

With the co2 canister and other stuff in the stand, I'd only have room for a 10 gallon sump.

The inline plumbing seems to have pretty good flow during testing.



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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Spent the weekend painting. The metal frame is done. I even took the time to mask off and paint the PVC tubing. I'm trying a different paint than the last time I did this. Last time I tried to use Krylon Fusion paint. It worked OK, but scratched off easily. This time I'm trying Rustoleum Ultra. I tested it on a small piece and it took a lot more effort to get it to scratch off. The only thing I don't like is either the spray nozzle leaks, or it can only be sprayed when the can is vertical. I got paint all over my hand using it.

The lighting makes the stand look more blue than it is.

Wood Automotive exterior Gas Electrical wiring Bumper


The plumbing:

Water Automotive tire Wood Asphalt Road surface


The plywood back wall and floor. I used Glossy white spray paint for these pieces. It holds up well to water drops. The water tends to bead up on the surface so you can wipe it off.

Hood Wood Table Rectangle Automotive exterior
 
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