The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I So my main question is suggestions for fish, but one of my main road blocks is that the reason that I have always owned goldfish and koi is because they have personalities and interact with people, a trait that from my understanding is lacking in many of the schooling fish who are more plant friendly. So what sort of fish would be interactive with their owners without also completely trashing my tank.

I'am finally re-homing my Sarsasa, Shubunkin and reg Comet to a friend of mine who has a large indoor pond at the greenhouse they own. I love those fish they all had their own personalities, but they are just too large for my tank and can't go back out in my pond because of raccoons, and birds. I probably wait a month or so before getting any new fish so I allow the plants time to recover.
So any suggestions anyone has would be great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
If you're ok with a species only tank, Tiger Barbs have very interactive personalities. They're entertaining and not shy at all, and they come in several different colors. The only problem is that they are aggressive, so they do best with their own kind only. People have mixed experiences with these fish. I personally liked them, even though I ultimately decided to stop keeping them. When I purchased a school of about 10 babies and raised them together, I didn't have many problems other than the usual chasing and stealing food (they will steal food right out of another Tiger Barb's mouth). However I had a disease wipe out all but one and when I tried to restock the tank, I ended up with serious aggression problems. So if you do go with Tiger Barbs, I would say your best bet is to raise them together as babies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you're ok with a species only tank, Tiger Barbs have very interactive personalities. They're entertaining and not shy at all, and they come in several different colors. The only problem is that they are aggressive, so they do best with their own kind only. People have mixed experiences with these fish. I personally liked them, even though I ultimately decided to stop keeping them. When I purchased a school of about 10 babies and raised them together, I didn't have many problems other than the usual chasing and stealing food (they will steal food right out of another Tiger Barb's mouth). However I had a disease wipe out all but one and when I tried to restock the tank, I ended up with serious aggression problems. So if you do go with Tiger Barbs, I would say your best bet is to raise them together as babies.
Thanks for the suggestions. Can the different colors of barbs be mixed... well i guess i'm acting if the diff colors are subspecies with in the tiger barb family and would you then have to have several say (i'm not sure what colors they come in) but like 4 of one color and 4 of another as opposed to 1 of one color and 5 of another. I'm just wondering if they are like goldfish, same family but its usually not smart to mix comets and fancy goldfish together.
I'll keep them in mind and research them, because right now I have really no idea where I'm heading with this tank and haven't given a whole lot of thought to species tank verses a community tank.
Thanks a lot for the suggestion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Yeah, they can be mixed. They're not different subspecies, just different colors and they will all school together. This may be anecdotal, but I've kept every color and the natural Tigers were always much more aggressive than all of the other colors. Perhaps the selective breeding to get the different colors also bred out some of the aggression trait. As pretty as the natural Tigers are, if I did it over again, I would probably go without them.

I uploaded some pictures of the color variations. A large school of several different colors, or even the same color, is really beautiful because they have such bright, striking colors. And on a side note, if you want to add a bottom-dweller, bristlenose plecos seem to be able to hold their own with tiger barbs.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, they can be mixed. They're not different subspecies, just different colors and they will all school together. This may be anecdotal, but I've kept every color and the natural Tigers were always much more aggressive than all of the other colors. Perhaps the selective breeding to get the different colors also bred out some of the aggression trait. As pretty as the natural Tigers are, if I did it over again, I would probably go without them.

I uploaded some pictures of the color variations. A large school of several different colors, or even the same color, is really beautiful because they have such bright, striking colors. And on a side note, if you want to add a bottom-dweller, bristlenose plecos seem to be able to hold their own with tiger barbs.
Thanks for the photos!
What is the rule for number or fish of this size for my tank? I've know that usually for schooling fish the smallest amount is 4-6 especially for ones like barbs, but I in know way want to over stock my tank again.
Thanks for the pic and the help I'll read up on them and keep them in mind.

And is the cite Aqua Adviser accurate in its suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Also purely anecdotal, but my flame tetra school is super interactive and peaceful with my other fish. I would guess that looking at fish that have been captive bred for generations takes some of the fear out of them. I'm currently clicker training them using a flashlight, and they seem responsive to it. It's hard to train a whole school at once, but some of them have already learned the "swim through the hand tunnel to get a treat" trick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I would go with a minimum of 8 tiger barbs, but preferably more. At one point I had a school of 17 in my 36-gallon, but I also had two filters and my tank was very heavily planted. Generally, a bigger school will help aggression to be more evenly distributed among the school with no one barb being constantly picked on. I think AqAdvisor is good as a general guide, but the most important thing is to keep an eye on ammonia levels as you're stocking. Tiger barbs are extremely active, so it doesn't take many to make your tank look like it is buzzing with activity.

Also, I'm not sure specifically what you're looking for in terms of interaction, but tiger barbs are probably one of the most interactive of the schooling fish. They seem to be able to identify the person who feeds them and will follow you when you are around the tank. They are curious by nature and not shy. While cleaning the tank, they would frequently swim up to inspect me and the bravest of them would nip my arm (doesn't hurt btw).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
I would go with a minimum of 8 tiger barbs, but preferably more. At one point I had a school of 17 in my 36-gallon, but I also had two filters and my tank was very heavily planted. Generally, a bigger school will help aggression to be more evenly distributed among the school with no one barb being constantly picked on. I think AqAdvisor is good as a general guide, but the most important thing is to keep an eye on ammonia levels as you're stocking. Tiger barbs are extremely active, so it doesn't take many to make your tank look like it is buzzing with activity.

Also, I'm not sure specifically what you're looking for in terms of interaction, but tiger barbs are probably one of the most interactive of the schooling fish. They seem to be able to identify the person who feeds them and will follow you when you are around the tank. They are curious by nature and not shy. While cleaning the tank, they would frequently swim up to inspect me and the bravest of them would nip my arm (doesn't hurt btw).
Good to know thank for all your advice. My filtration system is pretty hefty in an attempt to accommodate the goldies. I have 2 50 gal marineland hanging filters, and have been considering getting the Eheim 2213 up to 65 gal. Maybe I'll still upgrade even without the goldies, I know canisters have better filtration, but shelling out 80 some bucks is a bit hard right now.
Thanks again for all the help.

Also purely anecdotal, but my flame tetra school is super interactive and peaceful with my other fish. I would guess that looking at fish that have been captive bred for generations takes some of the fear out of them. I'm currently clicker training them using a flashlight, and they seem responsive to it. It's hard to train a whole school at once, but some of them have already learned the "swim through the hand tunnel to get a treat" trick.
Cool. I was able to do that with one of my koi. He would grab pebbles and bring them up to you for a treat. Almost all fish could be personalbe just depends on how much you yourself interacts with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have a 36 gallon bowfront community. It holds 2 angels, 8 peppered corydoras, and 5 candy cane Tetras. It's a nice little community.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a 36 gallon bowfront community. It holds 2 angels, 8 peppered corydoras, and 5 candy cane Tetras. It's a nice little community.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Sounds like a nice set up. I've always like angels, but was told by several people that the 36 gal was too small/not tall enough.
The angels don't bother the other fish?

I've been looking things up and have been considering some the less agressive barbs, and was wondering if a angle or gourami dwarf or pearl could fit in, or perhaps a combination of all three.
Thanks for the info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Sounds like a nice set up. I've always like angels, but was told by several people that the 36 gal was too small/not tall enough.

The angels don't bother the other fish?



I've been looking things up and have been considering some the less agressive barbs, and was wondering if a angle or gourami dwarf or pearl could fit in, or perhaps a combination of all three.

Thanks for the info


Nope. Angels don't mess with any or vice versa. The bowfront is tall so it's plenty big for two angels.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nope. Angels don't mess with any or vice versa. The bowfront is tall so it's plenty big for two angels.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
So you have a heater? I've read that both the gouramis and the angles want warmer water. I keep my house fairly warm consistent temps so I don't know if I would have alot of drastic changes in temp I also should probably check to see what the temp in my tank is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I do have a heater. I keep it at 78* year round. My house is older so temps fluctuate from time to time. Plus I live in Missouri where one day it's 32 and snowing and the next it's 75 with the windows open


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Good to know. Is there a particular brand that is good? I might have to look into getting especially if I'm considering angles or gourami.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've been researching and wondered if I could in some way do a community tank with barbs and gourmai, or can I not mix groumai and barbs because of the temp difference? I'ed like and angelfish but I think they would get too big. If anyone has any suggestions or info on these fish it would be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
I've been researching and wondered if I could in some way do a community tank with barbs and gourmai, or can I not mix groumai and barbs because of the temp difference? I'ed like and angelfish but I think they would get too big. If anyone has any suggestions or info on these fish it would be helpful.
I have once barbs and angels 55 gal tank. I kept temperature around 75F, all fish were pretty happy with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,365 Posts
They are very cheap but for personality, the darters that come in with ghost shrimp are absolutely awesome! Mine will swim right up to me and rest in my hand if i make a cup,they eat out of my hand.

They are auper friendly and active, they love to swim up to glass and look at you.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I guess I'm going to be slightly evolving this thread. I've been doing a lot reading on line from other peoples experiences, and from what people have been telling me on here and am now trying to narrow down how much of what will go into the tank.
Interactive Fish Considered for the tank,
1 Anglefish
1 Honey or Pearl Gourami
2-3 types of barb (Odessa, Checker, Rosy or Gold (might be too big) in some combination)
The above post about the darter also sounds interesting.
So from peoples experience what combiantions of these fish could I make for a community tank that would fit in the tank and I know that you want 4-6 barbs of each color.
Thanks again for all the suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I think a gourami and barbs could work, depending on the type you go with. I would go with only one gourami though. They can be aggressive with their own kind and are in general territorial. I have a blue gourami and when I purchased him (or her), he was in the process of killing his tank mate (a fellow blue gourami). They are territorial toward other tank mates, but they usually just chase them out of their "territory" rather than nip. From what I've read about them, Pearl Gouramis tend to be the most "mellow" of the gouramis and dwarf gouramis are more sensitive to fluctuations in water quality than the others. Barbs are known to be fin-nippers, so I would go with a decent-sized school of a type that is less nippy because gouramis are slow-moving fish and their tentacle-like feelers (ventral fins I think) are attractive targets. I think the Gold Barb is one type that doesn't nip as much, but there might be more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
They are very cheap but for personality, the darters that come in with ghost shrimp are absolutely awesome! Mine will swim right up to me and rest in my hand if i make a cup,they eat out of my hand.

They are auper friendly and active, they love to swim up to glass and look at you.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Sounds interesting, especially since its a native fish, I'll have to see if I can work it in in some way.
Thanks for the suggestion.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top