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Does anyone have information of any tanks that are built on to, not into, a wall?

I have carpet on my lower floor of my home and do not want to make a permanent structure for the tank to rest on. It would ideally be great hung on a wall like a picture frame. It would be just below a wall mounted air conditioning unit, so I could build a hood to help cover the ac also.
 

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Its certainly not impossible if you have some basic carpentry skills and a basic understanding of how a home is built and how to build a support structure. I dont think a master carpenter or structural engineer is really necessary if we're talking about a 30 gallon tank though. Just someone comfortable with tools lol. I will point out though that "hanging" on a wall is a lot more permanent than a stand resting on your carpet. Its also going to protrude into the room quite a bit and wont really be like a picture frame (unless you get a lot more serious with your construction and place the tank "in" the wall instead of "hanging it on the wall"). If you go down this route; I'd suggest a combination of the two. Use cleats to span across multiple studs to support your shelf/platform along the wall. Then build some legs down off that platform to the floor at the front edge (furthest from the wall).
 

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Something to consider is hammocks. The idea of hanging heavy weight on a wall is demonstrated with those of us swinging in hammocks. With proper reinforcement, it can hold 100's of pounds easily. The problem is the failure rate of the hardware. I've had carabiners, eye hooks, etc., rated for 500 lbs break in half from shear force (weight}. Triple connections would be necessary for back up.
 

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What kind of house are we talking about here? Is it wood framed or is it a cinder block house? I'd be a lot more likely to trust something like this if I was able to sink some Tapcons into some cement.
 

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One thing to consider is this.
You go to depot and see all types of wall anchors capable of hold 100lbs in just drywall. The reason they can claim that is the load is mostly a shear load. Pulling downwards on the drywall not outwards. They usually state in fine print a ceiling application yields a significantly lower weight rating.
If you took that same anchor and grabbed it and started leaning backwards it would fail pretty quickly by way of tearing a massive hole in the drywall.
Same thing applies to lag screws or other fasteners in studs, albeit a lot more stronger.
So for example say you have a huge mirror weighing 200lbs hanging off 3 studs, that's 200lbs of weight applying force downwards evenly across lets say 3 fasteners(one per stud) since the mirror is 3 ft wide.
Now take a 200lb fish tank, 20 gallons. 30 inches wide(not wide enough to span more than 2 studs at once, 3 studs are 0"-16"-32" spacing on center, standard 20,29,37 are 30" wide). NOW it's also sticking out 12"! Now we are fighting a downward load and an outward load since the tank wants to fall away from the wall. You will start to bow the studs, causing fractures in your drywall over time. Next, is this a load bearing wall or just resting on the subfloor? Load bearing walls in modern houses are the wall which the top of stairs ends at, look at your top step from basement or second floor and left to right of the top of that step is the load bearing beam, every stud under that is load bearing. This also applies to the exterior walls running parallel with that beam. The wall between your bathroom and closet, not so much.
So an idea would be maybe build 2 legs that support the tank from the front and go at an angle towards the bottom of the wall. this would drastically reduce the pull the tank wants to apply to the wall.


Cinder block? Go ahead, just don't use tapcons, they're [censored][censored][censored][censored]. Use lag shields and lags, or other acnhors that state 400+lbs load. These anchors are made for any direction of load. Tapcons snap easily. Be sure to anchor into the solid part of the block, located directly center of the block and about 1-2" from the mortar joint(all measured from left and right of block, not top and bottom). The open parts are still strong but you can drop an anchor in the void if you're not careful.

Brick? NO.
Plaster? HELL NO
 
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