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Hey everybody,

I'm not entirely new here, I've been lurking around and I finally decided to join. I had a few planted tanks in the past and I finally decided to start a new one about a week ago, a pico in a glass cube vase. By my calculations it should contain about 3/4 of a gallon of water. Here's the setup:

Tank: 6 inch glass cube vase.
Lighting: 14W CFL spiral in a clip-on desk lamp, nine hour photoperiod
Filtration: Red Sea Nano HOB Filter, turned all the way down with lots of filter floss stuffed in the intake tube to reduce flow.
Substrate: Inert "Mojave Desert" sand, purchased from local garden center
Flora: Java Moss, Riccia
Fauna: Starhead Topminnow (Fundulus dispar) fry
Dosing: Excel, NPK as necessary

I would have liked to have an HC carpet with some rocks but since I don't have any appropriate substrate for that and I don't feel like dropping $30 for a bag of Eco Complete at the LFS when I only need $2 worth, I stuck to "rootless" plants. The java moss and riccia are both being held to the top of the sand by some aluminum mesh I found in my basement. I've read some horror stories about riccia on here, but I figured that I'd give it a try and if I don't like it I should have enough java moss to replace it eventually.

The fish are northern starhead topminnows, a common native killifish here in New Jersey. They don't get very big but they will still outgrow this tiny tank eventually (as any other fish I could think of would), at which point I will find them another home. Right now the two of them in the tank are a bit less than a centimeter long, tip of nose to tail. I might catch a couple more to keep them company.

Here's some pictures (water's still a bit cloudy from the sand):


View of the whole tank, front


Closeup of driftwood


Fishy


Another shot of whole tank
 
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