The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been working on this thing for two months now, and I can't seem to get it off the ground. My goal's been to grow a carpet before filling the tank, but after trying HC and Lilaeopsis brasiliensis and failing, I'm a bit disheartened. At this point, my last ditch is to try Echinorodus tenellus. The original plan was to run DIY CO2, but I'm having second thoughts on that as well. Its a 20 long with 5 6500k 13w CFLs. Substrate is just standard flourite with white sand over it. Does anyone have any suggestions for a next step? if i can't get the chain swords to take off, I'll most likely just give up on the tank.

Also, sorry for the crap photos
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
90 Posts
I've been working on this thing for two months now, and I can't seem to get it off the ground. My goal's been to grow a carpet before filling the tank, but after trying HC and Lilaeopsis brasiliensis and failing, I'm a bit disheartened. At this point, my last ditch is to try Echinorodus tenellus. The original plan was to run DIY CO2, but I'm having second thoughts on that as well. Its a 20 long with 5 6500k 13w CFLs. Substrate is just standard flourite with white sand over it. Does anyone have any suggestions for a next step? if i can't get the chain swords to take off, I'll most likely just give up on the tank.

Also, sorry for the crap photos
hey man dont give up on it! my plants where doing nothing for 5 weeks but then all of a suden they took off like horses i dont run co2 just use the tank as a natural place for the co2 to make at night/light off time i make sure i have little surface exchange and try to make the bubbles from the filter get rmoved buy a peice of plastic that the water can rool over my suggestion is stick with what you have untill you see good growth it will happen plants just are like pets they will learn they are in a good place soon enouth :fish:

edit: i think that your lighting is well enouth for that tank and you should be set when they plants take off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Put more water in it and try adding some fertilizer. How were the plants when you bought them? If they were grown underwater it takes them awhile to adapt

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,934 Posts
You didn't say if you had any shrimp. If so, start/w one ml per day and weekly move to 4 ml per day of Excel if you want some form of CO2 and that won't be very expensive but you need to be consistent with dosing. Once flooded it will help.
But here is what may be causing all your problems if you have no CO2 in there. By closing the top you can add DIY CO2.
You have 2.5 x the normal light for it if the fixtures hold the bulbs virtical.
Two of the clamp on light fixtures/w only two bulbs is normal for that sized tank.
Second, fish food/waste will supply almost enough ferts for a small amount of plants when you don't have much light but it's still incomplete and also depends on which plants. That Wisteria, for example will develope pin holes(at the least) without adding real ferts. This will develope once you add the water to it.
So what kind of fixture do you have for the light ?
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=184368
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=107303
I do like the scape. How abot a full tank shot of it ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
That's a lot of light for no co2 especially considering you have a 20 long. Check the PAR chart for those bulbs and your depth to substrate but I think just 1 fixture puts you in the medium light range. You will need 2 fixtures to get an adequate spread over the tank because of the length, but 5 is excessive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
I don't have any experience with the dry start method so I'm not sure what you should expect to see from your plants, using it. Maybe someone else can comment on that.

I would add water before I came to any conclusions about whether the plants were happy or not, and even then only after several weeks of observing them.

I do notice that piece of wood dosen't look clean. It looks like it still has bark on it, some dirt, and possibly something that looks like old algae or seaweed. You may want to clean it up or replace it with something better.

In this hobby you can normally expect to run into some set backs before getting success, and even then things sometimes go south even when you thought it was all working well. Learning is a big part of it, and having patience, and being willing to start again when necessary. If you are truly ready to throw in the towel already then maybe plastic plants are the way to go. They can be very realistic and successful growing is not a factor anymore. I'm not being facetious, just pointing out a viable alternative. I ran many tanks for many years with mainly plastic plants before wanting to devote the tank more to the plants than the fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I also don't have experience with the dry start method but I would assume it would be similar to growing normal houseplants. From the description it seems like the substrate is inert. Fluorite and sand contain no nutrients without fish waste or root tabs. I would try the root tabs and see if that can't get things going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
I would expect the bark will start to rot much faster than the wood itself. Also if there were any problems with parasites etc they would most likely be hiding under the bark. The hardscape added to a tank should be as inert as possible so as not to effect the water quality.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top