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I would say with the two finnex your at high light. Diatoms are fairly common in new setups, I wouldn't worry about eliminating phosphates, you need them especially in high light.

I wouldn't run both lights full power for a full light cycle. Not sure what you doing, but for example if one light is 7 hrs full run the 2nd one 2-4 hrs full. This gives the high light the carpet needs and helps you in the algae department. You could probably even run the other light less in 7 on full

Keep dosing and changing water on a regular basis. Keeping it organically clean is very important with good light.
 

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I think the 7hr, 3hr cycle sounds good. You'll get a feel for it, but that is plenty of time for the plants to grow. I've done full thick carpets with 5 hrs and 2 hr peaks. The diatoms are pretty harmless since they don't really stick hard to anything and will cycle out once the tank matures. You know otos and amano shrimp will clear it out pretty quickly. Yes, vacuum out what you can and try not to disturb the substrate and release anything into the water.
 

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UPDATE:

I waited until Sunday to do my weekly water change. By then a lot of the diatoms had disappeared from rocks and larger plants. I gave the whole thing a thorough clean and I have three otocinclus fish that are eating what remains in the smaller leaves of the DHG and marsilea. Because I saw improvement, I decided to hold off on adding the Phosguard. I just recently received a Phosphate test kit and currently, the value lies at 1.0 PPM.


With all that being said I am going to try a different approach. I have been reading a lot and I believe my main issue is that the tank has not been balanced properly. I have 2 Finnex Planted Plus 24/7 but I was dosing dry fertilizers using the guidelines for low and medium light setups. I have also added some high-light and fast-growing plants to my tank (R. indica, A. reineckii, and Ammania sp. Bonsai). I believe that should help with utilizing the nutrients (I will start dosing using high-light guidelines) so that they do not accumulate in excess and create more algae. That leaves the CO2 which I am trying to increase as far as I can without harming the fish. That way, the CO2 becomes the limiting factor and will be prevented more effectively.

Any thoughts?
Sounds good, in most cases, your better off dosing more. It's really more about light/co2/organic control then it is absolute fert levels. Don't cheat on water changes. Do them consistently and keep peak light period short if you have algae issues.
 
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