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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.plantedtank.net/tankprofiles/416/

I am proud to announce the next phase of my 15 gal paludarium setup.I must say its starting to really look like something. First major addition was the purchase of this nice piece of driftwood on ebay. It forms the divider for the spaghnum ground section along with some slate and silicone rubber. Here are the general stats for the tank so far.

Tank 15 gal.
Land area : Live spaghnum moss
Water area: Distilled water
Filtration: Duetto 50
Lighting: 15 watt strip gro-lite+ 23 watt cool white CF spot fill
Substrate:1 in gravel, I in. Mixed sphaghnum moss and Scotts african violet potting soil
Plants:Red Myriphyllium,E. Tennelus\

Next Step:
Carnivorous and other bog plants for the land section.
More plants for the water section.
I haven't tested the water yet but it stands to reason to be damn soft and acid. What kind of animal inhabitants? Neon tetras and maybe a betta. Possibly dwarf clawed frogs. But I want something that will use the land section. The temp is rarely less that 75 deg. so its a bit too warm for temperate newts...so what? a cealian? some small reptile?
 

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newts,firebelly toads, really anything that uses more water than land.
 

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i wouldn't put any land animals in then, because the sundew is a very deadly plant to small animals, even if they can't be digested by it, they will be stuck to it and die. Also, carnivourus plants steal all the land critter's food. i put a pitcher plant in my terrarium for 2 hours after i put 30 crikets in. 2 hrs later- 23 crickets in the plant.
 

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On the matter of the carnivorous plants, I wouldn't worry too much about having your animals trapped by them. All of the species that you chose are either quite small or have small areas for catching bugs. As a result, you would only have issues if your inhabitants were smaller than, say, a poison dart frog. I've kept larger sundews in with my firebelly newt before, and the only issue was making certain that I fed enough, as dufus was right that they easily attract your would-be food items.

I do, however, have one concern with your water section: unfortunately, distilled water will actually kill animals because of its purity. In addition, aquatic plants rely on many chemicals absent in DH2O to maintain long term health. Without certain trace elements, this tends to be an issue. I understand that this would make it more difficult for your carnivorous plants if you used tap water, but if you change it out often, as I did with my cps, you shouldn't have issues. Just a thought.
 

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newts, though, are nearly completely aquatic. with a FBtoad or anything similar, even anoles, a sundew is the most deadly plant commonly available. flytraps are less deadly because the frog can muscle out, but sundews have an acidic, sticky covering that is a very effective tool at catching and holding potential food. my first sundew had leaves about the size of a dime at most, and yet it could hold and eat a large grasshopper, and it once caught an adult water roach(big critter) and ate it.

so if you do get land animals, be very carefull about it. don't get too small of creatures, and go for the strongest ones.
also, avoid the "pacman" or"fantasy" frog, as it is rather hard to care for because it will attemp to ingest anything, including the sundew, which is toxic to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On the matter of the carnivorous plants, I wouldn't worry too much about having your animals trapped by them. All of the species that you chose are either quite small or have small areas for catching bugs. ....

......I do, however, have one concern with your water section: unfortunately, distilled water will actually kill animals because of its purity. In addition, aquatic plants rely on many chemicals absent in DH2O to maintain long term health. Without certain trace elements, this tends to be an issue.
Thew distiled water was killing the plants too! The water tested out too low in ph t be properly measured by a test kit that goes down to 4.5ph. I can hardly say whether the hardness test wast getting any reading at all. The plantswere showing the usually chlorosis and ph stress symptoms you would expect.

I have begun adding Calcium Carbonate in the form of a dietary supplement pill to both the water and the substrate. I have also been adding Sodium Bicarb and Epsom Salts and Potassium choride, all to raise the harness and PH. I am shooting for a GH of 8 and a ph of 5.5 . I am adding nothing to the land side, I am curious to see how carnivorous plants will reacti to this. The spaghnum mooss is already greening up faster, indeed all the plants seem to be improving and I can't help but wonder if they don't need at least some hardness, to thrive. Even 'acid pool' water plants seem to need at least a little, enought to bring the hardness into the merely 'soft' range.


The carnivorous plants or at least the first 2 arrived and frankly I find it hard to believe they would poe a hazard for anything but the tiniest of amphibians, as far as food competition I'm thinking of doing most of the feeding in the water section anyway. Thanx for the comments.
 
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