Risk mitigation strategies for tank animals when using CO2 - Page 2 - The Planted Tank Forum
 55Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #16 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 06:36 AM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by ipkiss View Post
Just wanted to bump the value of gas exchange as a couple posters mentioned before me. This is like your airstone mitigation idea but at even a higher level. It is one of the best "risk mitigation" steps by off gassing any excess co2 via surface agitation and loading up your tank with good oxygen levels to allow for even higher levels of co2 injection. I can't say that I've measured mine by any real scientific co2 meters nor most people on here, but I highly suspect some to be pushing beyond 30ppm easily without drama. Mechanical methods to limit co2 disasters are all good, but there's some solid value in simply "encouraging" nature to do its thing.


You may want to spend some time here:

https://www.advancedplantedtank.com/...-of-co2-safely

He used to have this video linked in there too, but I guess he reorganized some stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alTRKo8-jeM


and also the main co2 page and ... well. that entire site, really
I've been all over that site for a couple weeks, it is such a good site! That video was new to me. It is excellent and gave a lot of information. I feel much better having seen it. I have two 200GPH Aqueon canisters on this 50G (I have Endlers - great at overstocking themselves). Almost all of my plants sway gently in the current so I know there is good flow from top to bottom. My surface agitation looks almost as vigorous as his in the video.

I could not figure out why people are using skimmers on their freshwater tanks but the vid cleared that up. I love the idea. It cleans the surface, which solves air exchange and water chemistry issues, AND does a bonus super O2 injection while doing it. Buying one tonight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanna View Post
Absolutely possible and many of us do it. As @ipkiss mentioned, the key is excellent gas exchange. I use a skimmer to reach O2 saturation and it provides plenty of elasticity for fauna stress from CO2 movement, but there is no CO2 movement. The excellent gas exchange also works to maintain a stable CO2 level and that stability is important to minimize algae and enhance plant health. My CO2 levels, as measured by pH, are rock solid day and night, due to the gas exchange. You actually don't get a CO2 build-up at night. That means no variability, which reduces stress on the flora and fauna. The "oops" factor is actually lowered. Remember that pH is logarithmic. If a controller is set to pH of 6.5 and varies by just 2/10 point (which a drop in KH will force upon it), and your dKH is 3, your CO2 can jump from 28ppm to 45ppm. You better have good gas exchange to handle that.

Contrary to what seems intuitive, you actually use less gas by running 24/7. I suspect that it is due to not having to drive so hard to reach saturation every morning, which also can cause higher than desired levels toward the end of the photoperiod. There are also other benefits.
I'm almost sold on this concept of 24/7 CO2. The stability it brings is very appealing and I feel better about it now that I did a mini education in gas exchange. One fly in the ointment, I used a hearty portion of Seiryu rock and it appears that it will create a KH drift between water changes. Do you have to continuously alter bubble count to chase a KH drift? One idea I had for this is to buffer up the water at water change. The Seiryu dissolves in a weak acid so if I can push the starting pH higher, maybe it won't dissolve or as much.
ipkiss likes this.
ahem is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #17 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 12:48 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: PA
Posts: 2,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post
I'm almost sold on this concept of 24/7 CO2. The stability it brings is very appealing and I feel better about it now that I did a mini education in gas exchange. One fly in the ointment, I used a hearty portion of Seiryu rock and it appears that it will create a KH drift between water changes. Do you have to continuously alter bubble count to chase a KH drift? One idea I had for this is to buffer up the water at water change. The Seiryu dissolves in a weak acid so if I can push the starting pH higher, maybe it won't dissolve or as much.
No: CO2 does not significantly affect KH (it's negligible). If running 24/7, the amount of CO2 you establish in your tank remains fixed as a function of your delivery system, gas exchange and plant consumption, the former two having the most impact, by far. Using pH controllers (with varying KH levels) and/or timing solenoids to inject at certain times of the day create much more variability in CO2.

Incidentally, I'm not trying to convince you to go 24/7. It is simply another legitimate option, particularly if you are concerned about stable gas levels. I would guess that far more people use the CO2 timing approach than run 24/7 and they have no problems. However, I have often wondered how many "How do I get rid of this algae?" postings would disappear if CO2 were run 24/7 with good gas exchange.
ahem likes this.
Deanna is offline  
post #18 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 01:51 PM
Planted Member
 
Preeths's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bangalore, India
Posts: 164
There is only one thing controlling the CO2 that enters the tank. Its the needle valve. Get a good quality one. This will prevent 99% of the problems. keep the Co2 setup in a cabinet and lock it up once it is set. If you can do this, it will stop any one accidentally messing up with the controls. I lock mine up.

When you use 2 or 3 bps you will not suffocate the fish, whether the lights are on or off.

I differ with the general opinion that surface agitation is bad and most of the gas will escape. All my planted tanks have ample surface agitation that happens normally from the filter output. There is still sufficient CO2 remaining that the plants grow well.

-Preeths
Preeths is offline  
 
post #19 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 02:22 PM
snails are your friend
 
Blue Ridge Reef's Avatar
 
PTrader: (13/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,811
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post
That's an interesting idea. Does it expel all the CO2 gas in that 10 minutes and create a pH swing every hour?
Not all by any means, but over half. But these swings don't seem to impact livestock, I keep some pretty fragile Caridina shrimp in one of mine that would wipe out if such a swing were done via water change. But the osmotic pressure is stable when pH drops from carbonic acid from CO2 and this has been explained to me as to how full point pH swings can be done without stressing your fauna. My source water is +/- 1.5dKH out of the tap, and creeps downwards over time. I try to do 50% water changes weekly, but even if I skip a week the KH is still 1 dKH (according to a cheap API kit anyway). It's not the pH change that causes problems when too much CO2 is delivered, it's too much CO2/too little O2.
Greggz and ahem like this.

Nothing good happens fast in an ecosystem.
Blue Ridge Reef is offline  
post #20 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 02:41 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Greggz's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Novi, MI
Posts: 5,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanna View Post
Contrary to what seems intuitive, you actually use less gas by running 24/7. I suspect that it is due to not having to drive so hard to reach saturation every morning, which also can cause higher than desired levels toward the end of the photoperiod. There are also other benefits.
Can you elaborate on this? Maybe I am missing something.

For a few months I was not using my controller, just dialing CO2 in via flowmeter.

After much trial and error I had my flow rate set to 40 cc/min. At that rate, takes about two hours for pH to hit peak, then pretty much stays right there for the entire lighting period. So I had CO2 coming on two hours before light, then going off one hour before lights go off. The total CO2 injection time was 9 hours. I should note that I also have constant pretty vigorous surface agitation 24/7.

Running constant injection rate of 40 cc/min for 9 hours = 21,600 cc of CO2.

Running constant injection rate of 40 cc/min for 24 hours = 57,600 cc of CO2.

I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just don't understand what you are getting at or how that can be? Again, maybe I am missing something?
Blue Ridge Reef, ahem and Deanna like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Greggz is offline  
post #21 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanna View Post
No: CO2 does not significantly affect KH (it's negligible). If running 24/7, the amount of CO2 you establish in your tank remains fixed as a function of your delivery system, gas exchange and plant consumption, the former two having the most impact, by far. Using pH controllers (with varying KH levels) and/or timing solenoids to inject at certain times of the day create much more variability in CO2.

Incidentally, I'm not trying to convince you to go 24/7. It is simply another legitimate option, particularly if you are concerned about stable gas levels. I would guess that far more people use the CO2 timing approach than run 24/7 and they have no problems. However, I have often wondered how many "How do I get rid of this algae?" postings would disappear if CO2 were run 24/7 with good gas exchange.
24/7 is an interesting concept, I'm glad you brought it up. To me it mimics more of a natural environment where they would not experience a daily major shift in pH and CO2 levels. It's also simpler as you just set a bubble count and then I guess just keep an eye on the drop checker to make sure its green.
ahem is offline  
post #22 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 03:24 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Hendy8888's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greggz View Post
Can you elaborate on this? Maybe I am missing something.



For a few months I was not using my controller, just dialing CO2 in via flowmeter.



After much trial and error I had my flow rate set to 40 cc/min. At that rate, takes about two hours for pH to hit peak, then pretty much stays right there for the entire lighting period. So I had CO2 coming on two hours before light, then going off one hour before lights go off. The total CO2 injection time was 9 hours. I should note that I also have constant pretty vigorous surface agitation 24/7.



Running constant injection rate of 40 cc/min for 9 hours = 21,600 cc of CO2.



Running constant injection rate of 40 cc/min for 24 hours = 57,600 cc of CO2.



I'm not trying to be argumentative, I just don't understand what you are getting at or how that can be? Again, maybe I am missing something?
I would expect using it 24/7 your co2 input would be much lower than 40 cc/min, all you would need is to match the off-gassing rate of your particular aquarium. At the very beginning of the 24/7 schedule you would need to inject something greater in order to overcome that off-gas balance. Once the target is achieved you would have to decrease the rate just to maintain it.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Hendy8888 is offline  
post #23 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 332
Are there any issue with introducing animals straight into a 15-30PPM tank? I've seen articles, I think including on the 2HR aquarist to introduce them in the no CO2 part of the cycle to allow them to "adapt". But I have to question how that would be too different than the "trickle" method where you put them in a separate container and over the course of 2-3 hours you gradually mix their water with tank water.

Bump: Are there any issue with introducing animals straight into a 15-30PPM tank? I've seen articles, I think including on the 2HR aquarist to introduce them in the no CO2 part of the cycle to allow them to "adapt". But I have to question how that would be too different than the "trickle" method where you put them in a separate container and over the course of 2-3 hours you gradually mix their water with tank water.
Greggz likes this.
ahem is offline  
post #24 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 05:03 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Greggz's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Novi, MI
Posts: 5,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendy8888 View Post
I would expect using it 24/7 your co2 input would be much lower than 40 cc/min, all you would need is to match the off-gassing rate of your particular aquarium. At the very beginning of the 24/7 schedule you would need to inject something greater in order to overcome that off-gas balance. Once the target is achieved you would have to decrease the rate just to maintain it.
When I was manually dialing in CO2, I never changed the rate. Just a constant 40 cc/min.

My degassed pH was 6.40. Reading right before CO2 comes on was about 5.95 (does not fully degas overnight).

After two hours, pH was about 5.2 right when lights come on.

Slowly got lower then peaked at about 4.95 and stayed right there until CO2 is turned off. So in my 120G, it takes a steady flow of about 40 cc/min to maintain peak pH drop. I remember when Burr was running his 120G, his was even higher, more like 60 cc/min.

If I would dial back the flow during CO2 period, pH would predictably rise.

Now I do have a lot of surface agitation at all times. And I do run heavy aeration for 10 minutes an hour. This is really to make sure O2 is optimal for the Bows, and the heavier flow moves waste/detritus to the back edge of the tank.

Now the reason I know all this in such detail is I was dialing this in during the peak of the Pandemic. So was home a lot and carefully observed and noted everything that was going on. After carefully watching this cycle, I determined it was easier just to go back to the controller.

With the controller, I set the peak drop to 4.95. I run the flow meter at 50 cc/min, and the tank is almost at peak drop right when the lights come on. From there the pH bounces around from 4.95 to 5.05 all day long.

Still not seeing how one can possibly use less CO2 running 24/7.......but my ears are still open!

@Hendy8888 are you running CO2 24/7? Because if you are, based on your results lately might be worth a try!

Bump:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post
Are there any issue with introducing animals straight into a 15-30PPM tank?
Yes.

It's better to add livestock during a non CO2 portion of the day. If I am adding fish, I stop CO2 injection the day before and let the tank fully degas.

When you introduce a fish into a tank where pH is dropped by CO2, they can start gasping immediately. The smaller and younger the fish the worse it seems to be. I don't claim to know why, but I have seen it enough times to know that it should be avoided.

Funny thing is after being in the tank overnight, CO2 comes on next day and never seen a problem.

Again, don't know exactly why, but smart thing is to err on side of caution and get the tank fully degassed before introducing them.
Blue Ridge Reef and ahem like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Greggz is offline  
post #25 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 05:24 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greggz View Post

It's better to add livestock during a non CO2 portion of the day. If I am adding fish, I stop CO2 injection the day before and let the tank fully degas.

When you introduce a fish into a tank where pH is dropped by CO2, they can start gasping immediately. The smaller and younger the fish the worse it seems to be. I don't claim to know why, but I have seen it enough times to know that it should be avoided.

Funny thing is after being in the tank overnight, CO2 comes on next day and never seen a problem.

Again, don't know exactly why, but smart thing is to err on side of caution and get the tank fully degassed before introducing them.
That is interesting. I've got shrimp gradually acclimating in a separate container right now and going to start adding fish a little at a time tonight or tomorrow. It sounds like I need to keep the CO2 on a timer for now and let it degas in the evening to put them in. Thanks for the heads up, I don't want to see any tank critters suffering.
Greggz likes this.
ahem is offline  
post #26 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 05:38 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Hendy8888's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greggz View Post
When I was manually dialing in CO2, I never changed the rate. Just a constant 40 cc/min.



My degassed pH was 6.40. Reading right before CO2 comes on was about 5.95 (does not fully degas overnight).



After two hours, pH was about 5.2 right when lights come on.



Slowly got lower then peaked at about 4.95 and stayed right there until CO2 is turned off. So in my 120G, it takes a steady flow of about 40 cc/min to maintain peak pH drop. I remember when Burr was running his 120G, his was even higher, more like 60 cc/min.



If I would dial back the flow during CO2 period, pH would predictably rise.



Now I do have a lot of surface agitation at all times. And I do run heavy aeration for 10 minutes an hour. This is really to make sure O2 is optimal for the Bows, and the heavier flow moves waste/detritus to the back edge of the tank.



Now the reason I know all this in such detail is I was dialing this in during the peak of the Pandemic. So was home a lot and carefully observed and noted everything that was going on. After carefully watching this cycle, I determined it was easier just to go back to the controller.



With the controller, I set the peak drop to 4.95. I run the flow meter at 50 cc/min, and the tank is almost at peak drop right when the lights come on. From there the pH bounces around from 4.95 to 5.05 all day long.



Still not seeing how one can possibly use less CO2 running 24/7.......but my ears are still open!


@Hendy8888 are you running CO2 24/7? Because if you are, based on your results lately might be worth a try!
That's interesting, so do you think that co2 usage by the plants makes the 40cc/min be able to build up co2 as well keep the plateau? Did you ever test keeping the co2 on after lights out a bit to see if the ph dropped when the plants stopped photosynthesis? My suspicion is that if you ran it 24/7 it would build up a bit more and eventually you would need to turn it down.

All this is speculation on my part, I haven't done any tests at all and in fact have never run co2 24/7. I do the exact thing many say not to do...run co2 off of a controller with an active substrate.

Co2 injection methods vary with efficiency as well. It might take hours for some tanks to reach the desired ph drop and others including my tank can reach it in 10-15 minutes even using a wet/dry. After this 10-15 minutes of full tilt co2 the controller just maintains the level throughout the photo period. When co2 is on it currently injects at 700cc/min which definitely requires some safeguards incase of equipment failure. It seems I do the exact opposite of 24/7 co2.

I basically just accept the active substrate changes KH rule, every time I test the KH it is where I feel it should be, never seen it bounce around (not saying it doesn't). I don't add much KH so it limits this as well.
Greggz and ahem like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Hendy8888 is offline  
post #27 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 05:51 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Greggz's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Novi, MI
Posts: 5,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendy8888 View Post
That's interesting, so do you think that co2 usage by the plants makes the 40cc/min be able to build up co2 as well keep the plateau? Did you ever test keeping the co2 on after lights out a bit to see if the ph dropped when the plants stopped photosynthesis? My suspicion is that if you ran it 24/7 it would build up a bit more and eventually you would need to turn it down.

All this is speculation on my part, I haven't done any tests at all and in fact have never run co2 24/7. I do the exact thing many say not to do...run co2 off of a controller with an active substrate.

Co2 injection methods vary with efficiency as well. It might take hours for some tanks to reach the desired ph drop and others including my tank can reach it in 10-15 minutes even using a wet/dry. After this 10-15 minutes of full tilt co2 the controller just maintains the level throughout the photo period. When co2 is on it currently injects at 700cc/min which definitely requires some safeguards incase of equipment failure. It seems I do the exact opposite of 24/7 co2.

I basically just accept the active substrate changes KH rule, every time I test the KH it is where I feel it should be, never seen it bounce around (not saying it doesn't). I don't add much KH so it limits this as well.
You know I never let it run overnight. You bring up a good point about plants stopping photosynthesis. While my peak drop stayed steady with lights on, might be different if I let it run all night. And if that were the case, even more reason not to run 24/7, as you would have to constantly be monitoring it.

And I am right with you with the controller and active substrate. Exactly what I am doing. So maybe we are both wrong.

Now as to running CO2 24/7, I follow many of the best tanks in the world, and don't know of one who does so. I thought you might be the first. But maybe there are some out there, I have just never seen them.

P.S. Did you mean to say 700 cc/min? Or is that 70 cc/min? If it's 700 cc/min that is like turbo injection!
ahem likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Greggz is offline  
post #28 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 06:21 PM
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
Hendy8888's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greggz View Post
You know I never let it run overnight. You bring up a good point about plants stopping photosynthesis. While my peak drop stayed steady with lights on, might be different if I let it run all night. And if that were the case, even more reason not to run 24/7, as you would have to constantly be monitoring it.

And I am right with you with the controller and active substrate. Exactly what I am doing. So maybe we are both wrong.

Now as to running CO2 24/7, I follow many of the best tanks in the world, and don't know of one who does so. I thought you might be the first. But maybe there are some out there, I have just never seen them.

P.S. Did you mean to say 700 cc/min? Or is that 70 cc/min? If it's 700 cc/min that is like turbo injection!
Hopefully others like @Deanna and @Edward can comment as from what I remember both use high light with 24/7 co2.

I get the basic theory how it works and find it interesting but just never tried it. One factor that I don't see considered too much is change of water movements. Even with 24/7 co2 I would guess co2 ppm is not stable unless your evaporation/filter outflow/skimmer is constantly maintained for it's output. Having a ph probe along with a sump I have noticed immediate ph changes when tuning the tanks overflow (skimming). I can't help but think the co2 off-gassing will change with filter cleanings and tank evaporation. This would cause a variable in co2 ppm if co2 is kept constant. I guess this is true for any tank no matter how the co2 is set without a controller, just an observation I wanted to share.

And no, you read it correct 1.5 SCFH for my co2 flow. Needle wheel keeps up quite easily and a 20lb tank lasts 3-5 months depending on the light schedule. The old Burkert solenoid gets a workout though. lol
Greggz and ahem like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Hendy8888 is offline  
post #29 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greggz View Post
Now as to running CO2 24/7, I follow many of the best tanks in the world, and don't know of one who does so. I thought you might be the first. But maybe there are some out there, I have just never seen them.
It is definitely not mentioned. Like the video link @ipkiss posted, the guy on there does not mention 24/7 at all and the video is all about the ways to reach equilibrium of CO2 in the tank. However, most of the sites with the "best tanks" seem aquascape focused where fish are fewer and less important. So in that context, running CO2 at night might just be considered waste, which it may well be. I hypothesize that fish and inverts living in a stable pH and CO2 PPM is healthier than living in an environment that oscillates significantly (+/-1 pH and 3PPM <--> 30PPM). I have nothing to back that up at this point. If 30PPM is unnatural in the wild, it may not be good.
ahem is offline  
post #30 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-17-2020, 06:44 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
Greggz's Avatar
 
PTrader: (2/100%)
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Novi, MI
Posts: 5,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendy8888 View Post
Hopefully others like @Deanna and @Edward can comment as from what I remember both use high light with 24/7 co2.
LOL I said there may be tanks out there but I have never SEEN them. I'll stick by that statement!

Bump:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahem View Post
I hypothesize that fish and inverts living in a stable pH and CO2 PPM is healthier than living in an environment that oscillates significantly (+/-1 pH and 3PPM <--> 30PPM). I have nothing to back that up at this point. If 30PPM is unnatural in the wild, it may not be good.
Well if it's bad, I guess the fish in all of the planted tanks I follow didn't get the memo.

Folks have been keeping tanks like that for decades.

Just saying I also have never heard anything that would back up that line of thinking. In my experience, there are lots of things to worry about, but pH swings from CO2 injection is not one of them.

Bump:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hendy8888 View Post
Hopefully others like @Deanna and
And no, you read it correct 1.5 SCFH for my co2 flow. Needle wheel keeps up quite easily and a 20lb tank lasts 3-5 months depending on the light schedule. The old Burkert solenoid gets a workout though. lol
Wow that is a lot of CO2 flow.

Is that being dissolved in a reactor?

And your controller must go on and off constantly.

Very, very interesting.
ahem likes this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
---
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Greggz is offline  
Reply

Tags
co2 animal safety, co2 asphyxiation, ph controller, photocell relay

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome