A few RO unit questions - The Planted Tank Forum
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-05-2019, 06:48 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 308
A few RO unit questions

I am considering gettin an RO unit, thus I have some questions.

Per some searches I am thinking of this unit from BRS.
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/brs-4...m-75gpd-2.html

My water does get treated by the town with Chloramines.

Do I need to go to a DI filter as well? Can't I just use Prime as I have been?

My tap water has a high CA and MG level. Instead of adding GH booster is there a way to run the water through the RO unit (like a dial) so it doesn't strip everything, thus alleviates me having to remineralize with GH booster or alleviates the need for me to manually mix a % of tap water into the tank during water changes?

We are going to use the RO system for drinking water as well.

Instead of purchasing one of those 4 gallon storage pressurized tanks or dealing with setting up a trash can, auto float switch and a pump, wouldn't it be better to simply purchase one of these?

https://www.amazon.com/30-Gallon-RO-...83&s=hi&sr=1-1

I realize there is the cost factor. But I would need to buy a storage tank anyway for drinking water. They cost about $50 for the small 4 gallons. That plus the trash can, pump, and float, I might as well get the 30 gallon pressurized tank for $220 +/-. My current tank is 17 gallons. The next size tank I was considering was a 30-40 breeder, but no larger. So the 30 holding tank should work for all needs.

Am I thinking about this the wrong way?

This is my first time delving into the premise of using an RO system and how I need to set it up, storage, remineralization etc etc.

Thanks for any help.

iso
isonychia is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 06:18 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,273
Quote:
My water does get treated by the town with Chloramines.

Do I need to go to a DI filter as well? Can't I just use Prime as I have been?
Chloramines will be removed by the RO filter. So if your tank is filled with 100% RO water you probably don't need Prime. However if you are mixing tap and RO water you should use a water conditioner. Also I don't think a DI filter is necessary. Most RO system produce very soft water without DI filters.

Quote:
My tap water has a high CA and MG level. Instead of adding GH booster is there a way to run the water through the RO unit (like a dial) so it doesn't strip everything, thus alleviates me having to remineralize with GH booster or alleviates the need for me to manually mix a % of tap water into the tank during water changes?
Generallyit is difficult to build a system that will mix two different water sources and give you a consistent TDS. Tap water is going to be at a different pressure and the RO output and the pressure in the tank will effect the mixing ratio. It is possible to do but it is probably not easy ore cheep to get consistent results. You will get best results by manually mixing the tap and RO water.

Quote:
Instead of purchasing one of those 4 gallon storage pressurized tanks or dealing with setting up a trash can, auto float switch and a pump, wouldn't it be better to simply purchase one of these?

https://www.amazon.com/30-Gallon-RO-...83&s=hi&sr=1-1
If you can get a larger tank that would be helpful. But Keep in mind a larger tank will take up more space. 1 to 4 gallon tanks are popular because they generally fit under the kitchen sink, cost less, and can generally large enough drinking or cooking. A larger tank won't fit under most sinks and might have to be placed in a closet or the garage. And the RO unit and tank may have to be located in different places. And you might have tor ought a hose through a wall to connect the tank to the RO filter.

Quote:
Per some searches I am thinking of this unit from BRS.
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/brs-4...m-75gpd-2.html
Keep in mind the daily production rating of the RO unit. A RO system producing 75 gallons per day would easily fill a 30 gallon tank in about half a day. Do you need it to fill that fast? It might be worth considering a smaller system that would take a day or so to fill the tank. After all if you are mixing with tap water.
Surf is online now  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 07:23 AM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 40
Since the r.o. unit will be building the pressure on the bladder of the pressure tank, once you deplete that pressure you'll have to wait until the r.o. unit fills the tank up again before you have drinking water, or more water for your fishtank. Also the bladder pressure will deplete before you get a full 30 gallons out of the tank so you will be limiting yourself on how much water you get out of it at a time.

The gpd numbers they put on the r.o. unit's are in good conditions. I don't get near what they claim because I have a lot of TDS in my well water and it comes out of the ground around 55 degrees.
Nautilus29 is offline  
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surf View Post
Chloramines will be removed by the RO filter. So if your tank is filled with 100% RO water you probably don't need Prime. However if you are mixing tap and RO water you should use a water conditioner. Also I don't think a DI filter is necessary. Most RO system produce very soft water without DI filters.



Generallyit is difficult to build a system that will mix two different water sources and give you a consistent TDS. Tap water is going to be at a different pressure and the RO output and the pressure in the tank will effect the mixing ratio. It is possible to do but it is probably not easy ore cheep to get consistent results. You will get best results by manually mixing the tap and RO water.



If you can get a larger tank that would be helpful. But Keep in mind a larger tank will take up more space. 1 to 4 gallon tanks are popular because they generally fit under the kitchen sink, cost less, and can generally large enough drinking or cooking. A larger tank won't fit under most sinks and might have to be placed in a closet or the garage. And the RO unit and tank may have to be located in different places. And you might have tor ought a hose through a wall to connect the tank to the RO filter.



Keep in mind the daily production rating of the RO unit. A RO system producing 75 gallons per day would easily fill a 30 gallon tank in about half a day. Do you need it to fill that fast? It might be worth considering a smaller system that would take a day or so to fill the tank. After all if you are mixing with tap water.
Surf, thanks for the info. I will respond soon running a bit short on time.

Bump:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nautilus29 View Post
Since the r.o. unit will be building the pressure on the bladder of the pressure tank, once you deplete that pressure you'll have to wait until the r.o. unit fills the tank up again before you have drinking water, or more water for your fishtank. Also the bladder pressure will deplete before you get a full 30 gallons out of the tank so you will be limiting yourself on how much water you get out of it at a time.

The gpd numbers they put on the r.o. unit's are in good conditions. I don't get near what they claim because I have a lot of TDS in my well water and it comes out of the ground around 55 degrees.
I think you lost me on this a bit.

So if I have a 30 gallon tank filled, and I use 1 gallon, then come back 5 minutes later and try and get another gallon I have to wait until it fills completely for enough pressure to build? That doesn't make sense. I'm probably just reading your response incorrectly.
isonychia is offline  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 11:00 PM
Planted Member
 
stevewb's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Milan, Mi
Posts: 155
I prefer having my RO stored externally (empty aquarium) as it can be heated and things added to it easily. And the little tank under my sink for drinking. But when I’m filling for fish it pulls from the tank so unusable for several hours.
DiscusStu likes this.
stevewb is online now  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-06-2019, 11:35 PM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Northwest Ohio
Posts: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by isonychia View Post
[

I think you lost me on this a bit.

So if I have a 30 gallon tank filled, and I use 1 gallon, then come back 5 minutes later and try and get another gallon I have to wait until it fills completely for enough pressure to build? That doesn't make sense. I'm probably just reading your response incorrectly.
Sorry about that! No, I was assuming that you plan on using the 30g storage tank for water changes also. If you used most of your storage tank for a water change, then you may have a time period when you don't have any drinking water.
Nautilus29 is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 01:07 AM
Algae Grower
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Michigan
Posts: 33
I've had a BRS 6 stage RO unit for 4 years now and am very happy with it and highly recommend....some things to consider

1. The 75 GPD unit you're eyeing has an approximate 4:1 waste to product water ratio....for every 100 gallons of RO water that's 400 gallons of waste water. You can cut that in half with a 150 GPD water saver upgrade....there's other upgrade sizes, too

2. Water pressure into to the RO membrane should be between 70-80 psi to work effectively - you may need a pressure booster if your household water pressure is lower

https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/1-4-a...ster-pump.html

3. Consider a DI unit if the TDS of your RO water is still too high for your liking; in my case I'm on a water softener and the RO TDS is 5 ppm....the DI unit takes it down to 0 when the DI resin is new
rzn7z7 is online now  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 07:26 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,273
Quote:
The gpd numbers they put on the r.o. unit's are in good conditions. I don't get near what they claim because I have a lot of TDS in my well water and it comes out of the ground around 55 degrees.
This sounds like a pressure problem rather than a TDS issue. If you are operating the unit at the recommended pressure you should get the production rate specified. TDS shouldn't have much effect on the production rate until the filter is almost full of solids. At least that has been my experience. Another issue is that if your water has a lot of iron and manganese in it the filter can clog really fast. If you have high iFe Mn levels you might have to prefilter the water with a water softener before it is sent to the RO filter.

One note on pressurized storage tanks is that periodically you have to pump air in to the internal bladder. If you don't do this the pressure in the bladder many not be enough to push the water out. So most of the RO water stays in the tank instead of common out like it should. So to insure a 30 gallon tank will dispense 30 gallon you need to make sur the bladder is pressurize to the PSI level recommended by the manufacture. Generally you should check the bladder pressure at a minimum of once per your. Once every 6 months would be better.
Surf is online now  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-07-2019, 08:07 AM
Wannabe Guru
 
Triport's Avatar
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Central Coast of California
Posts: 1,179
If you want to use it as drinking water I would think no on the DI unit. If money isn't an issue you may also consider a small RO system for under your kitchen sink and a separate system for fish.

I have two pressurized tanks to store my RO water and my issue with them is my water pressure in the house isn't high enough for them to work effectively. They are two 40 gallon tanks and I only get 45 gallons of water out of them. Not the end of the world but a pain especially as I add more aquariums. Also my water flow out of them is very slow. About a gallon a minute. I am waiting to hear back on a price on a new system that will store more water with a float valve and use a pump for faster use but the place I got it from has been short staffed so a bit slow to get back to me.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Triport is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-10-2019, 10:14 PM
Planted Tank Guru
 
PTrader: (7/100%)
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 2,372
Never use a pressure tank with an aquarium unless you are using DI to make sure it's 0 TDS all the time because of TDS creep with pressure tanks.

Also, not using a chloramines carbon block will kill your RO membrane much faster. If you have high TDS city water along with chloramines use the following:

1 micron sediment -> 1 micron carbon -> 1 micron chloramine carbon -> RO membrane

Also tune your rejection rate to match your city water TDS. I always see people buying RO/DI filters and complaining that their DI resin dies quickly and when they check their TDS out of the RO it's sky high. If the water coming out of your RO is not 2 TDS or less then your rejection rate is off. This can be done even with sky high TDS water. There's more to having an RO filter than just buying it and connecting it.

Also, if your city water pressure is not at least 60psi get a booster pump. RO membrane efficiency goes way up with higher pressure. You want around 90 psi for best efficiency. When you hit a 10 psi drop in pressure change out the sediment filter.
mgeorges likes this.
gus6464 is online now  
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-16-2019, 08:21 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by rzn7z7 View Post
I've had a BRS 6 stage RO unit for 4 years now and am very happy with it and highly recommend....some things to consider

1. The 75 GPD unit you're eyeing has an approximate 4:1 waste to product water ratio....for every 100 gallons of RO water that's 400 gallons of waste water. You can cut that in half with a 150 GPD water saver upgrade....there's other upgrade sizes, too

2. Water pressure into to the RO membrane should be between 70-80 psi to work effectively - you may need a pressure booster if your household water pressure is lower

https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/1-4-a...ster-pump.html

3. Consider a DI unit if the TDS of your RO water is still too high for your liking; in my case I'm on a water softener and the RO TDS is 5 ppm....the DI unit takes it down to 0 when the DI resin is new


I did some tests and here is the info.

TDS out of my tap: 500ppm

Water pressure: 74psi

Based on these results any thoughts as to what I should look at purchasing?

Also I am going to be using this system for both drinking water and my current 17gallon tank. If I change tanks down the road the largest I would get would be a 30 gallon.

I'm not sure I am understanding why everyone is suggesting to not get a large pressure tank for a holding tank. If I don't get 1 pressure tank to hold my water I'm looking at getting a single smaller pressure tank for my drinking water and then a separate garbage can with float switch for my tank water. It just seems like a lot of extra components.

iso
isonychia is offline  
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-16-2019, 08:59 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
mgeorges's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 1,330
Quote:
Originally Posted by isonychia View Post
I am considering gettin an RO unit, thus I have some questions.

Per some searches I am thinking of this unit from BRS.
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/brs-4...m-75gpd-2.html

My water does get treated by the town with Chloramines.

Do I need to go to a DI filter as well? Can't I just use Prime as I have been?

My tap water has a high CA and MG level. Instead of adding GH booster is there a way to run the water through the RO unit (like a dial) so it doesn't strip everything, thus alleviates me having to remineralize with GH booster or alleviates the need for me to manually mix a % of tap water into the tank during water changes?

We are going to use the RO system for drinking water as well.

Instead of purchasing one of those 4 gallon storage pressurized tanks or dealing with setting up a trash can, auto float switch and a pump, wouldn't it be better to simply purchase one of these?

https://www.amazon.com/30-Gallon-RO-...83&s=hi&sr=1-1

I realize there is the cost factor. But I would need to buy a storage tank anyway for drinking water. They cost about $50 for the small 4 gallons. That plus the trash can, pump, and float, I might as well get the 30 gallon pressurized tank for $220 +/-. My current tank is 17 gallons. The next size tank I was considering was a 30-40 breeder, but no larger. So the 30 holding tank should work for all needs.

Am I thinking about this the wrong way?

This is my first time delving into the premise of using an RO system and how I need to set it up, storage, remineralization etc etc.

Thanks for any help.

iso
Hello! I've been running several BRS and Spectrapure RODI systems for a while, and I too deal with chloramines. My water co. adds up to the legal limit, <4 ppm if I recall correctly, water report states 3.5+ ppm. I have added on an extra canister to a couple of my units to try to maximize my efficiency in removing chloramine.
My setup is as follows for my tank water units -
1 micron sediment filter -> 1 micron BRS Universal Carbon Block -> 1 micron BRS Universal Carbon Block -> RO -> DI.

I still add just a dash of Prime before putting remineralized water in my tank. Better safe than sorry.

For drinking water purposes, setup a bypass for DI. It's not technically recommended to drink RODI water, but RO is fine.

This has provided me with excellent filter life, including the DI, and undetectable levels of chlorine for many months. Test strips test total chlorine, which is what chloramine would be detected in, and free chlorine. I do not bother using standard granulated activated carbon blocks in my units because chloramine exhausts them VERY rapidly in my experience. You have to have catalytic carbon.

Two things will occur if you do not have catalytic carbon (Universal Carbon Block) to break the chlorine+ammonia bond. 1. You're adding unnecessary wear and tear on your RO membrane, as there will be chloramine breakthrough, and 2. You'll rapidly degrade your DI stage as it tries to deal with the bypass chloramine. The RO membrane is not at all effective at chloramine removal.

As to allowing Ca and Mg through, there's no way to do that. You'll have to get a GH booster. I use MgSO4.7H2O and CaSO4.2H2O for remineralizing, plus a dash of CaCl. I'd be happy to share my chart with you, might make life a little easier.

For drinking setup, I have two of these, one at my office and one at home and they're great -
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/6-sta...ystem-brs.html
This would be my recommendation, and then have a separate storage for your tank water. This already has an auto shutoff and a flow switch, so you would just need a float valve and a storage tank for fish water. 55 gallon blue storage tanks can typically be found pretty cheap on Craigslist! The pressure tank is designed to fit under your sink, help keep out contaminants, and give you a nice flow rate to fill your glass. If I were trying to fill buckets, however, at the flow rate my faucets have...I'd lose my mind. That 30 gallon says it has an 18 gallon water capacity, seems small, and you won't be able to adjust the flow rate of water - your stuck with however fast it wants to give you water.

If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.
mgeorges is offline  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-06-2020, 08:37 PM Thread Starter
Planted Tank Obsessed
 
PTrader: (3/100%)
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgeorges View Post
Hello! I've been running several BRS and Spectrapure RODI systems for a while, and I too deal with chloramines. My water co. adds up to the legal limit, <4 ppm if I recall correctly, water report states 3.5+ ppm. I have added on an extra canister to a couple of my units to try to maximize my efficiency in removing chloramine.
My setup is as follows for my tank water units -
1 micron sediment filter -> 1 micron BRS Universal Carbon Block -> 1 micron BRS Universal Carbon Block -> RO -> DI.

I still add just a dash of Prime before putting remineralized water in my tank. Better safe than sorry.

For drinking water purposes, setup a bypass for DI. It's not technically recommended to drink RODI water, but RO is fine.

This has provided me with excellent filter life, including the DI, and undetectable levels of chlorine for many months. Test strips test total chlorine, which is what chloramine would be detected in, and free chlorine. I do not bother using standard granulated activated carbon blocks in my units because chloramine exhausts them VERY rapidly in my experience. You have to have catalytic carbon.

Two things will occur if you do not have catalytic carbon (Universal Carbon Block) to break the chlorine+ammonia bond. 1. You're adding unnecessary wear and tear on your RO membrane, as there will be chloramine breakthrough, and 2. You'll rapidly degrade your DI stage as it tries to deal with the bypass chloramine. The RO membrane is not at all effective at chloramine removal.

As to allowing Ca and Mg through, there's no way to do that. You'll have to get a GH booster. I use MgSO4.7H2O and CaSO4.2H2O for remineralizing, plus a dash of CaCl. I'd be happy to share my chart with you, might make life a little easier.

For drinking setup, I have two of these, one at my office and one at home and they're great -
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/6-sta...ystem-brs.html
This would be my recommendation, and then have a separate storage for your tank water. This already has an auto shutoff and a flow switch, so you would just need a float valve and a storage tank for fish water. 55 gallon blue storage tanks can typically be found pretty cheap on Craigslist! The pressure tank is designed to fit under your sink, help keep out contaminants, and give you a nice flow rate to fill your glass. If I were trying to fill buckets, however, at the flow rate my faucets have...I'd lose my mind. That 30 gallon says it has an 18 gallon water capacity, seems small, and you won't be able to adjust the flow rate of water - your stuck with however fast it wants to give you water.

If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.
mgeorges, thanks for all the info.

So here are a few questions.

As a reminder here are the tests I did.

Tank size: 17 gallon with plans to move to a 30/40 gallon breeder down the road set up as a paludarium 75% filled) So max water change weekly would be about 8 gallons currently possibly moving to say maximum of 15 gallons if I get a larger tank. Amount of RO water used will also be based on answer to question #3 below.

• TDS out of my tap: 500ppm

• Water pressure: 74psi

1.) Do I need the DI portion?

2.) Do I need a booster pump?

3.) Should I remineralize my tank water or simply use a percentage of tap with RO water in my tank?

Due to the space I have under my sink I was hoping to keep the RO unit under there for ease of cartridge changes and keeping the drinking water storage tank in the crawlspace (about 4feet tall) under my sink/kitchen.
Since it seems I NEED to keep a separate storage container for tank water, this would also have to go in my crawlspace. My questions on this are:


4.) Will I run into problems concerning the distance from the RO system (under my sink) to and from either my drinking water storage tank and my sink?

5.) Since it seems I need a separate bin for my tank water storage, what kind of a system would be easy to pump water from that storage tank to my aquarium?
I plan to have the tank near the access doors to my crawlspace. I envisioned some sort of flexible tubing hanging inside the access door area, that I can simply pull out and turn a valve on to dispense RO water right into my tank. But since the storage tank is not pressurized, I guess I have to also have some sort of an electric pump that I will have to turn on to get water into my aquarium. This is why I was hoping to have a pressurized holding tank for my aquarium water. Any ideas on this?

6.) Do I need a water saver feature to reduce the amount of waste water as suggested by another member in this thread?

7.) Do I need a TDS meter on the unit?

8.) Do I need any pressure gauges on the system to monitor cartridge performance/replacement?

Thanks,
iso

Last edited by isonychia; 01-06-2020 at 08:49 PM. Reason: edit
isonychia is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-06-2020, 08:56 PM
Planted Member
 
PTrader: (0/0%)
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
Posts: 287
Picking a slight nit: It's not the reverse osmosis itself that removes chloramine. It's the carbon prefilter that is invariably part of a reverse osmosis system.

Which means you need to change the filter according to schedule.
deeda likes this.
kgbudge is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 01-06-2020, 10:24 PM
Wannabe Guru
 
mgeorges's Avatar
 
PTrader: (4/100%)
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 1,330
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by isonychia View Post
mgeorges, thanks for all the info.

So here are a few questions.

As a reminder here are the tests I did.

Tank size: 17 gallon with plans to move to a 30/40 gallon breeder down the road set up as a paludarium 75% filled) So max water change weekly would be about 8 gallons currently possibly moving to say maximum of 15 gallons if I get a larger tank. Amount of RO water used will also be based on answer to question #3 below.

• TDS out of my tap: 500ppm

• Water pressure: 74psi

1.) Do I need the DI portion?
I would advise it. Helps remove everything that was missed by everything else and will bring your water down to 0 TDS. It's also kind of a "fail safe" if you start to get breakthrough from your carbon blocks. I don't test religiously by any means, so if I start noticing my DI resin is going quicker, I know it's time to check the carbon blocks. Not the best way to do anything, and I'd advise setting up a bypass where you can test your water for chlorine/free chlorine after it hits the carbon blocks, but before it hits the RO.

2.) Do I need a booster pump?
75 PSI is very adequate, no booster pump needed.

3.) Should I remineralize my tank water or simply use a percentage of tap with RO water in my tank?
Up to you. Personally, I prefer the remineralization route, that way I know exactly what's going into my tanks and can adjust if I see an issue.

Due to the space I have under my sink I was hoping to keep the RO unit under there for ease of cartridge changes and keeping the drinking water storage tank in the crawlspace (about 4feet tall) under my sink/kitchen.
Since it seems I NEED to keep a separate storage container for tank water, this would also have to go in my crawlspace. My questions on this are:


4.) Will I run into problems concerning the distance from the RO system (under my sink) to and from either my drinking water storage tank and my sink?
Can't say for sure. You might experience some pressure drop, depending on how far we're talking. If we're talking a few feet, you won't notice anything.

5.) Since it seems I need a separate bin for my tank water storage, what kind of a system would be easy to pump water from that storage tank to my aquarium?
I plan to have the tank near the access doors to my crawlspace. I envisioned some sort of flexible tubing hanging inside the access door area, that I can simply pull out and turn a valve on to dispense RO water right into my tank. But since the storage tank is not pressurized, I guess I have to also have some sort of an electric pump that I will have to turn on to get water into my aquarium. This is why I was hoping to have a pressurized holding tank for my aquarium water. Any ideas on this?
First, I wouldn't advise pumping RO directly into your tank, I'd remineralize first. If you're doing a 50% water change and add RO and then add the salts to remineralize after, there's going to be a big parameter swing and you'll stress the hell out of your fish, could be lethal too. You could remineralize your GH and KH right in your RO storage container, and keep track of what you're removing volume wise, and add more GH and KH accordingly to account for the fresh RO water that will be getting added to replace what you've taken. Plenty of people here go the route of a pump in their RO storage tank, I'm currently making myself fill and haul buckets from my 55 gallon storage barrels, however. So advice on best pump setup would be better left to someone else.

6.) Do I need a water saver feature to reduce the amount of waste water as suggested by another member in this thread?
I do not personally use one, but it has the benefit of drastically reducing waste water. Reducing waste water means more product water, which means you can go longer without replacing filters. It's also more environmentally friendly, if that's a concern for you. You would need a booster though to run a water saver, it requires 90 PSI I believe. It's simply an additional RO membrane if I'm not mistaken.


7.) Do I need a TDS meter on the unit?
It's definitely a nice add-on, and I think you can get them rather cheaply. I've never added on to mine, but again, this can save filter/membrane life if used correctly.

8.) Do I need any pressure gauges on the system to monitor cartridge performance/replacement?
It's beneficial. It ensures you're getting proper pressure to your RO membrane, and if you see a drop, you know it's time to replace your sediment filter. I never let my sed filters get to that point, but it's another one of those "nice to have"s.

Thanks,
iso
Answers in bold!
mgeorges is offline  
Reply

Tags
None

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Planted Tank Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome