Pest snails.... - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 07:33 AM Thread Starter
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Pest snails....

So my tank has never had a snail issue. I havnt planted any new plants or added anything. All of a sudden I have this huge snail outburst. Tank has been running for about almost 4 months now. My question is if anyone can identify the snail species. I've been manually removing them and placing them in an jar aquarium for now. But it doesnt stop haha! I put these 2 on my kitchen counter to get a better view. Trumpets? Bladders?
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 02:19 PM
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Yep, bladder snails, Physella sp.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 02:35 PM
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Probably a bulid-up of something is increasing their food supplies. i always think of snails as a good tool to see how "clean? the tank is. Excess organics from fish waste, dead/dying leaves, food, algae will increase their numbers. Reduce those and you will see a reduction in the snails as well.


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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 02:42 PM
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I had a tank where I all but eradicated them by feeding less. If you still have plant adjusting they feed on dead plants but after that it is basically mostly food you put in. There will always be some, but if you decrease food sources and remove them manually you can be rid of them in time. I got rid of bladder snails by doing this but still have mini ramshorn. But I introduced regular ramshorn because I like them.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:13 PM
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I'm going with pond snails due to the dextral shell (right turned), unless the photo is tricking my eyes. If they are bladders, the antennae will be very fine as opposed to the thicker antennae of a pond snail. Either way, they are generally considered a net positive in your planted tank.

Nothing good happens fast in an ecosystem.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Newbie Tankard View Post
... I got rid of bladder snails by doing this but still have mini ramshorn. But I introduced regular ramshorn because I like them.
I have found mini ramshorn to be tough as well, but should still clear up eventually be limiting food supply.

Does anyone know how to tell the difference between a mini ramshorn and a baby ramshorn? Is is the angle of the shell?


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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:27 PM
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Mini ramshorn are very small and their shell is horizontal, like laying flat against the glass or surface. While ramshorn snails has the same spiral they get larger and their shell is oriented more like sitting on their back vertically. Also mini's shells are quite thin in relation to ramshorn have a fatter appearance. This is all relative to each other and makes it harder if you only have one. Do a google image search of mini ramshorn and another of ramshorn and you should see a difference like what I am trying to describe.

Cordially,

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie Tankard View Post
Mini ramshorn are very small and their shell is horizontal, like laying flat against the glass or surface. While ramshorn snails has the same spiral they get larger and their shell is oriented more like sitting on their back vertically. Also mini's shells are quite thin in relation to ramshorn have a fatter appearance. This is all relative to each other and makes it harder if you only have one. Do a google image search of mini ramshorn and another of ramshorn and you should see a difference like what I am trying to describe.
Thanks for the confirmation, i thought it was something like that. I wasn't sure if the regular ramshorn start off with their shell horizontal and then it shifts to being more on their back.


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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 05:31 PM
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A snail outbreak is like algae--a rite of passage for most new tanks. I wouldn't worry too much about it--as others have said once their food source (excess fish food, algae, dead plants) is limited, their numbers will be too. Lots of loaches and some other fish will eat them. Saw a post recently where someone's corydoras had learned to tagteam on snails & eat them. I had a huge explosion when I was cycling through several algae outbreaks after starting my tank. A couple of pea puffers eliminated them--except the MTS which quickly learned to stay buried in the substrate and only come out at night. Once the pea puffers were banished for fin nipping, the MTS started reappearing during the day. Can snails be smart?

An assassin snail or two will help keep their numbers down. And they're pretty with brown & yellow striped shells. Or there are lots of attractive species you can get to outcompete the ones you don't want. Some like nerites can't reproduce in the aquarium, so overpopulating won't be a problem. They do serve a valuable purpose in keeping down algae, eating leftover food, and aerating the substrate. If they really bother you, you can trap them with pieces of zucchini or something and keep removing them. But I wouldn't bother--just like with algae their numbers will normalize & reach a balance.
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