New to Cherry shrimp - The Planted Tank Forum
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-30-2019, 03:28 AM Thread Starter
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New to Cherry shrimp

I just ordered 10 bright yellow cherry shrimp, and today I realized I may have just jumped into something too quickly.

I have had Amano shrimp for several years(the same shrimp during the entire time), and wanted to try something new but I kinda impulse ordered after my chicken died on Christmas.

They will be placed in my 5g with a baby betta, the tank has been stable for 2 years. How important is a TDS meter thing, and which one would you recommend? (I've been browsing the sticky threads)

Oh, and just how much more fragile are the bright colors that aren't cherry?

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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-30-2019, 03:42 AM
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I wouldn't worry about too much in all honesty, neo's are referred to as cockroaches in that they breed like mad and don't die.

There is one thing that does concern me about your situation though, the betta. It will eat the shrimp most likely at some point. There's very few fish that people recommend with shrimp, with fish if it fits in the mouth it is food.

Other than that the shrine they will send will be small, and the younger they are the less sensitive they are and can handle the stress better. Acclimate them as you would any normal stock and you should be okay unless you have really soft water. You don't have to have a tds meter just need to know if your hardness is hard enough basically from tap.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-30-2019, 12:33 PM Thread Starter
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I wouldn't worry about too much in all honesty, neo's are referred to as cockroaches in that they breed like mad and don't die.

There is one thing that does concern me about your situation though, the betta. It will eat the shrimp most likely at some point. There's very few fish that people recommend with shrimp, with fish if it fits in the mouth it is food.

Other than that the shrine they will send will be small, and the younger they are the less sensitive they are and can handle the stress better. Acclimate them as you would any normal stock and you should be okay unless you have really soft water. You don't have to have a tds meter just need to know if your hardness is hard enough basically from tap.


My water hardness is hard, typically the hardest reading possible. My tap is basically leaking stalactites.
I have a 40g that I can always transfer the shrimp to if the betta eats them once he grows up. Iím renovating it soon, to be a high light tank.


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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-30-2019, 07:16 PM
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I wish I could say the same as Tankard... I started out with Neos... purchased them from different sources... they never thrived. (at least, never long term!) Never really gave or sold any away... at one point, I probably had around 70-ish shrimp. This was after attempting for a few years. Most people have *hundreds* within 3-6 months... I don't know that I ever made it over 100 in the nearly 4 years I'd tried keeping Neos... and now I might have one left.

A TDS meter is not required, but I do find that it helps for a lot of things! I can't use strait tap water because my shrimp die! There's just not enough minerals... so I have to remineralize the water anyway. I use a TDS meter to remineralize the water to the parameters that I want. (after figuring out what I want the parameters to be at, I use that TDS) I use a TDS meter to figure out how big of a water change I should do (from removing water and adding in new water at potentially a different TDS to equalize things out again)... I use a TDS meter to acclimate shrimp into the tank. I use a TDS meter to make sure that the water I get is as close as possible to RO water as can be.


When you say your water is hard, the hardest reading, what is it at? 10 GH? 15 GH? 25 GH?
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 02:53 AM Thread Starter
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180 GH and typically 180 KH, though my KH will go up a bit after water changes sometimes.
The 180 GH is the hardest on my scale, so I assume that my water could be harder. The stalactite was only kinda a joke, the water that drips in the facet turns into a calcium deposit(mini stalactite), and the calcium on the rimless fish tank will creep over the sides forming a shelfstone looking deposit.
On the plus side, my PH is super stable, same as my GH and KH. My tap and tank is the same, so little fluctuates when I change water.

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:41 PM
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That's pretty hard water, especially on the KH side. My biggest advice is to drip acclimate your new shrimp very slowly. Might be a good idea to test the water that the shrimp arrive in to see how big of a change in pH and hardness they're going to have to go through. If you can get them to acclimate to your water, any babies they have should be perfectly suited to it. Though you won't likely have many babies grow up with a betta in such a small tank.

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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 03:55 PM
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@Blue Ridge Reef

Do you know of any difference between breeding at different GH levels. Reason I ask is in my main tank the GH is 8 and I'm getting more offspring even with fish in the tank. I have another tank where the GH is 5 and I only have the shrimp in it and don't see many babies.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 04:32 PM
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Not really. My Neos seem to breed in tap or Caridina parameters. If there's a difference in production or survival, it's not enough to notice. Of course there are probably many variables from food to temperature to things we may not even yet understand that impact things more than we know.
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 04:42 PM
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@trahana You should get a liquid GH and KH test kit... I would not say your GH/KH is very hard... without that kit. Your GH might even be twice what you're seeing, but you wont know without a liquid test kit.



@Asteroid if the GH is too low, then offspring may not be able to survive as they need the added minerals in the water for molting purposes. Granted, I would expect that at 5 GH, you might see more than I did at 3 GH... so the next question is.... are the shrimp in the 5 GH tank breeding? Do you have berried females?
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 04:57 PM
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if the GH is too low, then offspring may not be able to survive as they need the added minerals in the water for molting purposes. Granted, I would expect that at 5 GH, you might see more than I did at 3 GH... so the next question is.... are the shrimp in the 5 GH tank breeding? Do you have berried females?
Yes, they have bred and I've seen some offspring. They went into the 5 GH tank the same time as the 8 GH tank. The GH is different due to the amount of Seriyu Stone.

edit: So I guess it's more about offspring survival
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 05:32 PM
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@Asteroid I would recommend getting a remineralizer and just dialing in the parameters to what you need them to be at rather than relying on rocks and other things... Remineralize all new water going into the tank to be at desired parameters. This way, there's less chance of parameter swings each time you do a water change.
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 06:04 PM
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@Asteroid I would recommend getting a remineralizer and just dialing in the parameters to what you need them to be at rather than relying on rocks and other things... Remineralize all new water going into the tank to be at desired parameters. This way, there's less chance of parameter swings each time you do a water change.
Thanks I'll give that a try and see how it goes.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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@trahana You should get a liquid GH and KH test kit... I would not say your GH/KH is very hard... without that kit. Your GH might even be twice what you're seeing, but you wont know without a liquid test kit.






@Asteroid if the GH is too low, then offspring may not be able to survive as they need the added minerals in the water for molting purposes. Granted, I would expect that at 5 GH, you might see more than I did at 3 GH... so the next question is.... are the shrimp in the 5 GH tank breeding? Do you have berried females?


I have a liquid test that I use occasionally, last I checked it was maxed out hard. My tap is from well water, the gh hasnít changed in the 15 years Iíve been fish keeping.
I only use the strips for testing mid week so I know if I need to change the water between my usual schedule. I know the strips expire, but with 7 fish tanks I use them up fast enough.


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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 07:22 PM Thread Starter
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That's pretty hard water, especially on the KH side. My biggest advice is to drip acclimate your new shrimp very slowly. Might be a good idea to test the water that the shrimp arrive in to see how big of a change in pH and hardness they're going to have to go through. If you can get them to acclimate to your water, any babies they have should be perfectly suited to it. Though you won't likely have many babies grow up with a betta in such a small tank.

Thatís exactly what I plan to do. Iíve been told to always drip acclimate shrimp. The betta has a month or two of growing before I worry about him hunting(heís small). Iíve had good luck raising betta babies along side other fish and having them as a community fish. Last time I raised a baby betta with three baby mollies and it was two of the mollies that started biting the other fish once they where adults.


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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 07:44 PM
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I don't know that you can "max out" a liquid test kit, per-say... you just keep adding drops until you get the color change... be it 1 drop or 25 drops...
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