180 gallon low tech project - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-05-2015, 10:32 PM Thread Starter
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180 gallon low tech project

Hi all,

I have a 180 gallon tank that I want to convert to a low tech planted tank. The dimension of the tank is 6'x2'x2'. I will be using one of those big eheim canister filters for filtration. I was planning on stocking the tank with some rainbows and cories. My inspiration or muse for the aquascaping is Ha Long Bay

I do have a few questions for the experts here:

1. Is there a low tech moss like plant that would attach well to rocks to simulate the trees and grass in Ha Long Bay?

2. Would I be able to get away with a low tech setup with these plants?

3. how much co2 would these plants require?

4. If i only want the plant growth on the rocks would I need a special substrate on the rest of the tank?

Thanks in advance!!
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 02:34 AM
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I couldn't find what the bottom of ha long bay looks like, but I will try to answer your questions. I would add that in a tank that size, I would plan on 2 canister filters.

1. All mosses are low tech. It's a matter of what you are looking for. Moss can be messy and end up in places you never intended. I have weeping moss in my tank that I never even put in there...haha. With a tank that size, you could use dwarf baby tears, or maybe something like anubias nana petite. I do not know what kind of grass you are referring to, but most grasses only do well in high tech setups.

2. I would need a better idea of what you are looking for. A plant list would be helpful.

3. CO2 is used on high tech setups. It is still undetermined if it's even necessary. There is also know way of knowing consumption of CO2.

4. Any plant on a rock will spread to the substrate. You will need to do regular trimmings to keep your plants where you and them.

I hope I helped at least a little. Best of luck.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 05:38 AM
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Where did you get a 180 gallon tank? Is that Acrylic?
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 02:06 PM
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Java moss will almost grow with out light. I have harvest and kept in bucket on the floor with just the light from the tank for months. Once it get started in your tank it grows like a weed. To much light and algae will grow in it. Any pieces that break off will fall to the bottom of the tank and start to grow. It can be more of a weed than a plant. On pieces of drift wood it looks very nice but I have to harvest it every month are it will take over. A little will be a lot in a short time.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Here is another pic of my muse.

Thanks for the info.

It is an old oceanic glass tank.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 09:52 PM
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Wouldn't Fissidens be a good choice? I don't know if it will grow in a low tech tank or not though.

I'd be starting the tank dry. Set up the hardscape. Chop the moss of your choice up small and paint on the rocks where you want it to grow, keep damp by covering tank and spraying planted areas as needed and well lit until you start to see new growth then flood the tank. That's how it is done, of course there are lots of details needed to actually do that.

You definitely don't need a special substrate for the bottom of the tank, you never do. A smooth sheet of pale sand is likely the best way to showcase the rocks and moss.

Even though you have a big tank I'd choose small fish for your particular scape. A while back a talented scaper made a terrific mountain scape and put discus in. It was shocking, looked like flying saucers in the tank as the scale was so off. Beautiful fish, beautiful scape but together it was awful.


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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-06-2015, 10:12 PM Thread Starter
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Kathy,

Thanks for the tip, I will look up fissidens and see if it can be done. Smaller fish is a great idea but i will avoid discus. Been there done that already and they are high maintence.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-07-2015, 02:22 AM
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You could use white sand, cover all but the island are with grey slate to mimic the water. Or a better idea that I saw on a Takashi Amano tank. You could use a mirror on the bottom that would reflect the water's surface movement on the bottom. I imagine it would be difficult to keep clean. Maybe if it had a protective cover on it like a phone's screen protector. I'm not sure fissidens would be the right look on seiryu stone. Probably dwarf baby tears would look best, but then that would mean that the tank would most likely need to be high tech. I hope this gives you some ideas.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-07-2015, 02:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mv1175 View Post
Hi all,

I have a 180 gallon tank that I want to convert to a low tech planted tank. The dimension of the tank is 6'x2'x2'. I will be using one of those big eheim canister filters for filtration. I was planning on stocking the tank with some rainbows and cories. My inspiration or muse for the aquascaping is Ha Long Bay

I do have a few questions for the experts here:

1. Is there a low tech moss like plant that would attach well to rocks to simulate the trees and grass in Ha Long Bay?

2. Would I be able to get away with a low tech setup with these plants?

3. how much co2 would these plants require?

4. If i only want the plant growth on the rocks would I need a special substrate on the rest of the tank?

Thanks in advance!!
I would read up on the Diana Walstad method of low tech tanks. From what I've casually read, you don't need a filter, or co2, though adding pressurized co2 won't hurt. Plant fast growing plants. Anyway look over that method before you proceed.
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