How much surface movement will gas off CO2? - The Planted Tank Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-06-2015, 11:42 PM Thread Starter
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How much surface movement will gas off CO2?

I have 2 530 GPH circulation pumps facing the front of my aquarium, the water discharge hits the glass and circulates around the tank, the problem is is that it produces some decent sized ripples where it hits the glass, will that gas off my injected co2?
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 02:19 AM
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CO2 outgases from water very easily, just as it dissolves from the air into the water very easily. So, nothing we can do will eliminate the outgassing. What we can do is increase the CO2 bubble rate enough to compensate for whatever rate the CO2 is leaving the water at the water surface.

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 05:19 AM
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Good sized ripples are OK, but if the fish are getting out their surfboards, this is a bit much.
Too little surface movement can allow scum to build up and this inhibits gas exchange, but this includes reducing the oxygen movement into the water, and this is bad for the fish.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 12:45 PM
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CO2 in the Tank

Hello sohank...

Overfiltering your tank will mix more oxygen into the tank water. This is fine for the fish, but not for the plants. O2 is a byproduct for the plants. They try to remove it from the water. So, a high O2 environment isn't good for the plants.

I suggest you remove one of the filters and simply change out more tank water and do it more often. Large, frequent water changes do much more for the tank than another filter. Do this and you'll keep the tank water cleaner for the fish and reduce the surface movement and increase the CO2 in the water for the plants.

Pretty easy.

B

"Fear not my child, just change the tank water."
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post
Hello sohank...

Overfiltering your tank will mix more oxygen into the tank water. This is fine for the fish, but not for the plants. O2 is a byproduct for the plants. They try to remove it from the water. So, a high O2 environment isn't good for the plants.

I suggest you remove one of the filters and simply change out more tank water and do it more often. Large, frequent water changes do much more for the tank than another filter. Do this and you'll keep the tank water cleaner for the fish and reduce the surface movement and increase the CO2 in the water for the plants.

Pretty easy.

B
I use 2 powerheads, I have one 264 GPH filter, which is a little underpowered, but I am very lightly stocked.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post
Hello sohank...

Overfiltering your tank will mix more oxygen into the tank water. This is fine for the fish, but not for the plants. O2 is a byproduct for the plants. They try to remove it from the water. So, a high O2 environment isn't good for the plants.

B
Interesting, I've never heard this perspective before. Although the plants let off O2, I don't think the plants, nor surface agitation, can increase O2 to the point that it would be harmful. Surface agitation can only push O2 levels to equilibrium with the outside air. If you have to much O2 you merely get pearling. I'm definitely an advocate for a healthy amount of surface ripple (as others have noted, not enough to break the surface).


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Last edited by c9bug; 09-07-2015 at 05:25 PM. Reason: edited typo
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by sohankpatel View Post
I use 2 powerheads, I have one 264 GPH filter, which is a little underpowered, but I am very lightly stocked.
Hello so...

Filtration doesn't do much to keep the tank water clean. The filter simply takes in toxic water and returns the water to the tank a little less toxic. A tank with a few fish in it, still needs large, weekly water changes to maintain a healthy environment. The longer the same, old water stays in the tank and is filtered over and over loses its ability support the fish and plants in a few days. By flushing a lot of pure, treated tap water through the tank, you replenish everything that keeps the fish and plants healthy.

Do the fish and plants a big favor. Change a lot of water and do it every week!

B

"Fear not my child, just change the tank water."
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 04:40 PM Thread Starter
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Hello so...

Filtration doesn't do much to keep the tank water clean. The filter simply takes in toxic water and returns the water to the tank a little less toxic. A tank with a few fish in it, still needs large, weekly water changes to maintain a healthy environment. The longer the same, old water stays in the tank and is filtered over and over loses its ability support the fish and plants in a few days. By flushing a lot of pure, treated tap water through the tank, you replenish everything that keeps the fish and plants healthy.

Do the fish and plants a big favor. Change a lot of water and do it every week!

B
I do weekly 20 gallon water changes, almost 50 percent
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 04:47 PM
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Moderation in all things is the way I go. Too much of anything is too much?
The same can be said of almost any part of tank work. Too much water changing can be just as bad for your enjoyment of your tank as too much algae so if you are doing 50% weekly, it is for you to decide if that much work really gets you more or less enjoyment.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 05:46 PM Thread Starter
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Moderation in all things is the way I go. Too much of anything is too much?
The same can be said of almost any part of tank work. Too much water changing can be just as bad for your enjoyment of your tank as too much algae so if you are doing 50% weekly, it is for you to decide if that much work really gets you more or less enjoyment.
i dont really mind changing that amount of water, it only takes 30 min and i am using a siphon and a bucket.
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post #11 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 06:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBradbury View Post
Hello so...

Filtration doesn't do much to keep the tank water clean. The filter simply takes in toxic water and returns the water to the tank a little less toxic. A tank with a few fish in it, still needs large, weekly water changes to maintain a healthy environment. The longer the same, old water stays in the tank and is filtered over and over loses its ability support the fish and plants in a few days. By flushing a lot of pure, treated tap water through the tank, you replenish everything that keeps the fish and plants healthy.

Do the fish and plants a big favor. Change a lot of water and do it every week!

B
Filters, of course, can't remove anything dissolved in the water. So, if you are referring to the slow build-up of organics in the water, it is true that filtering doesn't correct that. But, filters do remove floating debris in the water down to as small a particle as the pores in the filter. Much of the faint cloudiness we can get in our water is floating particles. More filtering, with better filter media, does greatly reduce that cloudiness.

Filtering and water changes are two different things. You shouldn't select one and ignore the other. Many people are successful with both big, often water changes, and lots of filtration, just as many are successful with few water changes and moderate filtration.

I think most of us have observed the effect of a big water change on our fish - they get more lively, full of energy, and hungrier. So, I don't dispute at all the good effect of big water changes on the fish.

Hoppy
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post #12 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 09:02 PM
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Just aim the powerheads down a little more so they do not create as big a wave. You can also aim them at an angle so they swirl the water around the tank more than straight down the front. The circular movement mixes co2 as well as pushes debris towards the filter intake.

You may also get better results with just one powerhead. I have noticed in your posts that you like to go for the maximum every time. Nothing wrong with that usually but in aquariums it can be better to take it slower at first. It is a bit like driving a car that you just built before you know how good the brakes work. You don't want to go any faster than you are willing to crash. You can always go faster later.
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post #13 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-07-2015, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
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Just aim the powerheads down a little more so they do not create as big a wave. You can also aim them at an angle so they swirl the water around the tank more than straight down the front. The circular movement mixes co2 as well as pushes debris towards the filter intake.

You may also get better results with just one powerhead. I have noticed in your posts that you like to go for the maximum every time. Nothing wrong with that usually but in aquariums it can be better to take it slower at first. It is a bit like driving a car that you just built before you know how good the brakes work. You don't want to go any faster than you are willing to crash. You can always go faster later.
I kind of do like to go for the max every time XD, i do have my powerheads facing the front, angled down and outwards, i was just wondering how much co2 a smallish ripple would gas off. My pristella and neon tetras seem to enjoy the flow, the gourami doesnt enjoy it, but he tolerates it.
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post #14 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-08-2015, 12:45 AM
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A small ripple will off gas some CO2.
A small ripple will mix surface scum with the water for removal via the filter.
A small ripple will help keep the O2 balanced with the level in the air.

Water movement in general throughout the tank will make sure the CO2, O2 and fertilizers get circulated to benefit the plants and fish. Some fish prefer more water movement than others. The fish from slower moving water in nature (Gouramis, in this case) will usually find a place in the tank that suits them.
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post #15 of 15 (permalink) Old 09-08-2015, 01:59 PM
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My rule of thumb is if you can see the water ripple, its OK,
If you can HEAR the water rippling, too much.

It's not scientifically quantifiable, but it works for me.

Last edited by MJB13; 09-08-2015 at 02:00 PM. Reason: editing for reason
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